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I think the "humorous look at how we are all a little farby" has taken a decidedly un humorous turn...... It is starting to sound like another forum....... Not good......
I was thinking exactly the same thing. I guess you really can’t get too humorous with this subject as too many people take themselves and the hobby too seriously. I’m just as much for “doing it right” as the most devoted person is, but I guess in the end I finally realized you CANNOT have it perfect. No matter how hard you “act like soldiers” and do everything by the manual, in the end you have people showing up for a weekend event, knowing they can be as hard of a charger as they want for 72 hours, knowing they’ll be at home by Sunday night at the latest. That, and people normally don’t get hurt or killed at events. No matter what, you’ll never, EVER be able to re-create the utter exhaustion that men in action have, living in utter filth for weeks or months at a time. Nor can you simulate the noise, concussion or pain that comes from indirect fire. You never have to worry about being shelled or bombed, nor dealing with refugees begging for food (or going hungry when someone zaps the supply truck or walks off with your K ration). And most of all, you can’t simulate not being able to leave when your wife calls or you rip your pants and forgot to bring another pair.

So once I realized all this, I realized that if this was the case, anyone who would sneer at the way someone else was looking at the hobby was actually guilty of gross hypocrisy.

And as for that "other" forum you mention, well, the day I removed myself from it was a day when I felt like a giant weight was lifted from me. The hobby would be so much better without it's existence.

Lee Bishop Formerly known as "Ratchet 5" with the 2nd Infantry Division (yes, in REAL life)

US WW2 War Correspondent collector

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This is my point. So many non veteran in reenacting can NEVER understand what combat vets feel, think and have to deal with day to day. And the prevalent attitude among reenactors to understand the men they claim to be honoring is missing something. I have tried over and over to explain what is important to a combat veteran and I keep getting the same answers:

 

Too serious

It's a hobby

Can't replicate war (why try then?)

Hypocracy

 

I'm sorry for being a combat veteran and understanding a soldiers mind. I'm even more sorry that many reenactors refuse to find out what guys like me think is important. When they get a glimpse they just don't get it. And this my friends is why combat veterans don't talk to you very often, or think you're posers when they do.

 

I'm done with this conversation.

 

Rock

2RO2.jpg

 

2/505th (RA) 5/502nd (RA) 2/505th (REEN)

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I'm sorry for being a combat veteran and understanding a soldiers mind.
I guess then I'm sorry for also being a veteran and still realizing that in the end it's all a pale simulation no matter how hard a charger you are.

Never said not to do the best that can be done. I just said people need to get over themselves and understand re-enacting IS NOT real combat. People should do as good as they can and leave their egoes inside their skulls. Sadly, so few people in the hobby are capable of that.

I too am done with this topic.

Lee Bishop Formerly known as "Ratchet 5" with the 2nd Infantry Division (yes, in REAL life)

US WW2 War Correspondent collector

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lol, the classic reenactor-tactical situation of "how many paratroopers does it take to.."

 

-Tim

Want to buy Large reg or Large Long green dominant ("lime") ERDL jacket. Original. Thanks.

 

B/104th 26th "Yankee Division"

F/2/5 USMC

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Hey Dirt old friend,you are correct,the humour level has really dropped precipitously!!!!

I bet we could mine this thread for diamonds and get rich so we can buy some really farbtacular thing....like our own Millenium Falcon,get it?hahahahhahahaha.

There my contribution to raising the humour quotient!

 

Now, this is my point, look at the way the guy is holding his Thompson, most likely an ex serviceman...

 

 

"Never met a WWII vet that told us to just "have fun". "

 

I wouldn't even consider with that you calling me a lier...The chap who told me that wears the 39/45 Star; Italy; Fr & Gr; Defence; CVSM&C; 39/45 War Medal; QEII Coronation and Silver Jubilee; CD & Bar; OMC; Silver Star, Bronze Star (2); Canada's 125...

 

He also didn't say "just" have fun...

 

 

"They, to a man, all say that war is a waste of humanity and that we never seem to learn. They hate war and don't think it's fun."

 

Exactly what I have been writing here, they fkin hated it and thought it was a pain in the arse, they just wanted to get the whole sorry experience over with and get home...

 

 

 

"As a veteran I look through the goggles of a 20 year old Sgt when it comes to battles (not in a field but over miles of terrain). It's The art of war was, is and always will be a deadly serious game to me. The reason many reenactors hate real veterans is because we reenact too seriously. Can't help it.

 

So guys can line up like civil war soldiers and charge the enemy, laughing all the way (if they have any breath left). I'm going to use terrain, mission, troop strength and time as a factors for my maneuvers- like a real soldier would have. In the meantime, reenactors will be lost as to what that means, mostly."

 

Something about a head up where the sun doesn't shine...

 

"not my fault that I can't have the same "fun" *playing* war like civilian minded reenactors do." Then why are you doing it?

 

Now, Sam (the auld veteran I was writing about) told us to have fun, as he acknowledges it is a hobby, but he also, like us, realises there are times when one has to give and treat this hobby with respect, and we do that thank you very much, and not just in our cosy little fields near home, we have done that on the actual battlefields where it all took place...In private and in the public eye...and for one story of that sir, go to http://www.freewebs.com/fssf-uk/romereunionjune2004.htm ...Have a read at that sir, then tell me I am not serious about this hobby....Tell me attending a private function with the President of the USA is not serious...

 

Or here:

http://www.alliedforum.net/viewtopic.php?f...=a&start=50

http://www.alliedforum.net/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1429

 

Take a gander at this one: http://www.freewebs.com/fssf-uk/ladifensatrip.htm

Lying in a pool of water all nite, soaked to the skin, in the morning eating cold ham and eggs from a repro K ration I spent the time researching and reproducing myself, doesn't sound like fun does it, but that's what I done sir, and not in a field near home, but on the mountain where the real battle took place, climbing that mountain in original gear (ok, repro corocoran boots), slept in 1942 sleeping bag, carried by 1943 ruck....

 

Now, if you think running around a field blatting a toy gun is serious re-enacting, then fine, go ahead wear yer serious face and serious attitude and don't have fun, and don't remember that it's just a hobby but something deeper and meaningfull, whilst you fire your toy gun going bang bang....

 

RE-enacting, or living history is not just about, and is a little bit more than, "just playing" at battles sir....

 

Back to the fun side, Sam at the Reunion in Ottowa 2007, just before we went to Petawawa he was getting some other veterans together as they where going to carry the colours, they got a bit worried (they are getting old and worried about goofing it) he told them not to worry, to enjoy it, and "have fun"...

 

I re-enact WWII, not your time in a modern army, I take the words of the veterans of that War sir, and not yours....

 

Now, back to Fallacious Accroutrements and Reprehensible Baggage (some carry with them in this hobby)....

 

Pinched berets...Carrying weapon low port as they do in a modern army, and not WWII...

"It is better to debate a question and never resolve it, than to resolve a question without debating it"

 

 

Looking for anything to d wi WWII rations....

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willysmb44, Thank you.. Come by able company's camp to collect your free beer....

 

Someone had to say it. Why are most of us doing this anyways?

 

Did the getting shot at, being miserable and dead tired thing for real. What would posses a man to do that for "fun"??

 

Despite your outlook on this hobby, their still blanks and you still have to go back to your life on monday. We are not living in a whole you dig every night and drawing down on every odd sound that comes from your permiter.....

Dirteater101

 

Head Gun junkie

Old Trooper Gunsmiths

 

"Support your local gunsmith; Shoot something till it breaks!"

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damm, how did that happen

 

the dreaded double post.....

 

I should lay off the coffee..........

Dirteater101

 

Head Gun junkie

Old Trooper Gunsmiths

 

"Support your local gunsmith; Shoot something till it breaks!"

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Not sure which Tommy carrier you mean,but I can clarify.Dirteater is the Tommy gunner pulling the pin on a grenade(he is a combat vet).The other is our Lt.,(he is not a vet) his carry is not as surmised a modern carry,but rather a natural reaction of being tired.Prior to this "shot" he had his weapon to his shoulder and was sighting,as Dirt and I, (the only other vet in the photo) prepared to "toss our eggs",his barrel started to droop,though he is still ready to fire.Dirt's carry is rather self explanatory,as he is pulling the pin yet in control of his weapon.

Back to humour; A farmer has a problem,none of his chickens is laying eggs,he consults with a physycist,who does the calculations and says " I have a solution,but it requires a spherical chicken and a vaccum."

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Not sure which Tommy carrier you mean,but I can clarify.Dirteater is the Tommy gunner pulling the pin on a grenade(he is a combat vet).The other is our Lt.,(he is not a vet) his carry is not as surmised a modern carry,but rather a natural reaction of being tired.,as Dirt and I, (the only other vet in the photo) prepared to "toss our eggs",his barrel started to droop,though he is still ready to fire.Dirt's carry is rather self explanatory,as he is pulling the pin yet in control of his weapon.

Back to humour; A farmer has a problem,none of his chickens is laying eggs,he consults with a physycist,who does the calculations and says " I have a solution,but it requires a spherical chicken and a vaccum."

 

When re-enacting a WWII soldier on patrol, or in fighting mode, hold the weapon (rifle) thus:

179th_Caiazzo_It-1.jpg

 

Despite the info out there, all too often one sees them still holding them thus (mostly ex Army types):

untitled-2.jpg

And thus:

untitled2.jpg

 

FSSF veteran William "Sam" Magee on top of La Defensa, Italy showing us how it was done (with a K98 Angelo had found there and restored, using bullets he also found there):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEDrswTQtjg...feature=related

"It is better to debate a question and never resolve it, than to resolve a question without debating it"

 

 

Looking for anything to d wi WWII rations....

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Ok,if you say so,I'll go with it! On a lighter note........how many pictures does it take to convince a reenactor he's right?..........A. all of them.teeheeheeheehee!

Willys you are correct sir about that other,never to be named forum! Dirt? can we up him to 2 free beers?

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Ok,if you say so,I'll go with it! On a lighter note........how many pictures does it take to convince a reenactor he's right?..........A. all of them.teeheeheeheehee!

W?

Priceless..."It's how I carried ma SLR in Northern Ireland, it's good enough for me"...

 

Let's do it as we want, and not as it was done :think:

 

While we're at it, I think those Corcorans are a bit uncomfy, I think i'll get a pair of Dr Martins ye know, the brown ones, high leg Aw!!

 

And those big floppy WWII berets, nah, didn't see them when I was in the Army Cadets in the 1970s, a nice tight fitting one, just resting above my eyebrowse, straight front an centre, those baggy trousers, nah, take them in, when I was in the Cadets ours where tight fitting, and we didn't tuck them into our boots, wore them outside wi our trousey wouseys, best stick wi wot I know best "it was wot I done in the army, it's wot I'll do now"

 

A jacket wi buttons down the front, are you crazy? I want a nice wind proof velcro close up front, when closed no one will know the diference ;)

 

WWII Garrison cap worn front straight and centre (as if I am in Vietnam) I got one photo of chap wearing it like this, one in many of thousands which have them worn at the side :pinch: The irony... :lol:

"It is better to debate a question and never resolve it, than to resolve a question without debating it"

 

 

Looking for anything to d wi WWII rations....

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Not a very successful disengagement on my part I'd say.I had thought to have Dirt save a beer for you too,but indications are you need to be cut off,a non-caffeine diet soda perhaps?

 

Nice photos, the 101st chaps, clearly they are wearing their hat cocked to the right hand side, the fashion of the time....PM sent :thumbsup:

"It is better to debate a question and never resolve it, than to resolve a question without debating it"

 

 

Looking for anything to d wi WWII rations....

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Here's one we had at an event a few weeks ago. One of our guys passed up sleeping in the Squad tent on COTS at reading to go to his motel room. Mind you he's not one of the older guys who cant hack it, he didn't have to drive long distance, he's basically was just the weekend wimp we were all jealous of at night :lol: :lol:

 

Here's the nicknames we came up with.

 

Ramada Ranger

Motel 6 Marauder

Days Inn Doughboy

Comfort Inn commando

Want to buy Large reg or Large Long green dominant ("lime") ERDL jacket. Original. Thanks.

 

B/104th 26th "Yankee Division"

F/2/5 USMC

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Here's one we had at an event a few weeks ago. One of our guys passed up sleeping in the Squad tent on COTS at reading to go to his motel room. Mind you he's not one of the older guys who cant hack it, he didn't have to drive long distance, he's basically was just the weekend wimp we were all jealous of at night :lol: :lol:

 

Here's the nicknames we came up with.

 

Ramada Ranger

Motel 6 Marauder

Days Inn Doughboy

Comfort Inn commando

 

Comfort Commando..Like it...

 

At one event I put a spoon tied to my calf, forks and spoons hanging from my belt, a pot on my head, and walked around with a large spoon and was a "Ration Ranger" for a while...For which I apologise, I didn't take it seriously...

"It is better to debate a question and never resolve it, than to resolve a question without debating it"

 

 

Looking for anything to d wi WWII rations....

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I brought out the first pic,because it's me in my AFJROTC uniform in the 70's at Wright-Patterson AFB.The boots I'm wearing in that one are actually Dr, Marten jumpboots,supply did'nt have any my size for about 6 months,so I had to make do till they came in.

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My favorite

 

The cell phone dependency reenactor. I suppose this is a symptom of today's culture, but I have been seeing this a lot recently. I am guilty of this, had to have mine when I was on call. But I had the decency to put it on vibrate...

But I have seen them used a "erslatz BC-190" field radios at tactical events. Adapt and over come I suppose....

 

Still not as bad as a mans phone with the most annoying ringtone in existence going off in formation or during a night movement.......

 

 

Humor reinserted......

Dirteater101

 

Head Gun junkie

Old Trooper Gunsmiths

 

"Support your local gunsmith; Shoot something till it breaks!"

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The funny one was we were in Terra Haute Indiana last year for an airshow. Well we were all portraying ground crew and as I have been doing THAT for over 26 years I know how ground crews all act (and of course talking to all the WW2 vets that say we do it right). This very rotund airborne type calls me over to tell me "you need to act more military", I started laughing and told him I'm still in, the one fellow was on hill 55 in Nam and was blown up, and our captain was airborne, I then told him "as fat as you are you need a cargo chute to get your fat a** on the ground". Yup, made a friend that day! :devil:

Msgt. Scott Dunkirk

401st B.G (H)

615 B.S.

AZGCLHU Inc.

 

Arizona ground crew page

 

 

(IYAMYAS)

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On a nite patrol in southern France last March (they like their nite patrols down there) we stopped for a reconn...Bruno,starts into his speil about wot is ahead...

 

Someone farted (wasn't me :rolleyes: )....

 

And ye know how in the silence of the nite, things travel...

 

The giggling started, then slowly spread, as Bruno tried to get order....I started to giggle again...It was contagious...Just didn't happen....

 

I think those French re-enactors are now convinced us Scots are mental...

"It is better to debate a question and never resolve it, than to resolve a question without debating it"

 

 

Looking for anything to d wi WWII rations....

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The funny one was we were in Terra Haute Indiana last year for an airshow. Well we were all portraying ground crew and as I have been doing THAT for over 26 years I know how ground crews all act (and of course talking to all the WW2 vets that say we do it right). This very rotund airborne type calls me over to tell me "you need to act more military", I started laughing and told him I'm still in, the one fellow was on hill 55 in Nam and was blown up, and our captain was airborne, I then told him "as fat as you are you need a cargo chute to get your fat a** on the ground". Yup, made a friend that day! :devil:
I had something like that happen to me as well. We had all our gear stacked up and were playing with a baseball and period gloves. It was as close to a WW2 scene as you could get. The group he was addressing included myself and three other guys. All of us were active duty Army (all in the same Brigade at that time) and this guy looked about as military as “George” from Seinfeld. After we quit snickering, I said, “What ‘military’ do you mean, the type that really exists where soldiers are human beings when the they can be, or the one from TV and movies where everyone has a ramrod up their forth point of contact and everyone sounds like they’re reading out of a TM every moment?”

Lee Bishop Formerly known as "Ratchet 5" with the 2nd Infantry Division (yes, in REAL life)

US WW2 War Correspondent collector

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  • 1 month later...

I do 1940-1943 living history, not reenacting.

 

I do agree I do need to change some stuff... :think:

 

For instance, glasses I wear are dark-rim photo gray (change from clear to dark when exposed to sun). What does this makes me... "visofarb?" :rolleyes:

 

But I put my cell phone on vibrate so as not to ring... and do not carry them on the belt but in the pocket. :ermm:

 

For some reasons, I do not wear a wristwatch at all, I only rely on my cellphone when I need to know time. At least this agrees with my time period, when it was not common for Pvts to have wistwatches! :thumbsup:

 

I am 54 years old, and probably someone will say I'm "agfarb" but I think that may be true of my wearing military uniforms in 1943, but not for 1940. :crying:

 

I remember a story of the US Army in between WWI and WWII. A soldier writes about his service in Hawaii. He states "another soldier had a heart attack in a parade." It seems he was so old... :unsure:

 

Take care,

 

Luis Ramos

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  • 4 months later...
I've got one to add:

 

Spectafarb - Someone whose impression is spot on, except for the fact that he's wearing modern spectacles (eyeglasses)

 

I will admit that I am a spectafarb. It isn't that I cannot find period eyeglasses. I have a very nice pair that are in good enough shape to wear. The problem I have is finding someone that will put lenses in them. When I first got them, I took my prescription and went to ten different eyeglass places to see if any of them would put lenses into my glasses, and most told me that they would not, because they cannot warranty their work if the put lenses into vintage frames. Some said that they didn't work with vintage frames. Some don't take frames that don't come from their store. One place said they didn't know how to take them apart. I eventually found a place that would do it, and I had prescription lenses in them for about two years and after moving, I've not been able to find another place to put lenses in. So now I try to find regular eyeglasses that look "okay", but it's a sad substitute.

I would have to agree with this, except that there's a big issue if you're female: there isn't "too much quality repro gear" available for women. I don't know of anyone who makes women's khaki trousers or khaki shirts. The only things really available for females are wool shirts and skirts, Class A's, and HBTs. Not much in terms of footwear except dress shoes, either.

 

Of course, this isn't an issue for the average Joe reenactor discussed in this thread, but it is an issue for us female reenactors. I wear original khaki pants, original wool pants, etc. I have an original wool shirt on which the sleeves are too short for me, but it will do until one of the repro places finally stocks women's wool shirts again. I'm currently making (as in, by hand, having made my own pattern, using my original wool shirt as an example) a khaki shirt because nobody bloody makes them.

This is the first time I've heard the SCA described as "medieval reenactment". Considering the SCA is a combination of various time periods and uses fictional countries ("kingdoms"), can it even really be considered "reenactment"?

I can't answer for others, but for me it is an interest in history and in seeing how things were done. I primarily like to do living history events and other educational (display type, although not necessarily encampments) events, and at those, it's interest in passing on things I've learned through my research, showing kids some of the original items, and talking about the time period, especially when I am doing an impression that isn't that common.

 

For example, I portray a WWII WAC veterinary technician and most people don't even know that there were female vet techs, especially since that's a time period during which most veterinary colleges either did not admit women or had just started admitting them. It's also a subject matter you don't hear a whole lot about in general. I love finding subjects like this that are not that commonly represented and then delve into researching them.

The glasses are a real handful for me too, as I'm a least a half foot taller then the AVERAGE ww2 GI, so I can't find vintage frames that actually fit, let alone anyone to make the lenses. Luckily, my day to day glasses are BCDs, so I can wear 'em for Nam. I used to have a real pair, until I lit them on fire. (an accident, I swear!!)

XRAY, THIS IS MONGOOSE 16 ROMEO. WHAT THE F**K, OVER?

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holy c#$%p! you found a way to destroy the dreaded BCG's! You have found a way to do what countless basic trainees have failed to do! I am curious on how one "accidentally" lights them on fire?

 

One good thing about glasses in warfare. As a poor sighted military member, I was issued the dreaded BCG's (for those not in the know, Birth Control Glasses) in basic. Shortly after basic and in tec training when the glasses would start sliding off my head when bending over equipment, my instructor informed me that "you really need to throw those out" and where my civvy issue glasses. But than he gave me the disclaimer "If you brake yours, uncle sugar is not going to pay for them".

When I got home my great uncle (36id ww2) after seeing my glasses said that he kept his civvy classes too. The army gave him a pair but he liked his better. Most guys in his company did not have civilian glasses before they went in, so were stuck with the issue ones. But the ww2 round wire issue glasses look so much better than the "buddy holly" models issued after the war....

 

So you could get away with good civilian glasses in uniform. Just don't brake them, uncle sugar isin't going to pay for em!

Dirteater101

 

Head Gun junkie

Old Trooper Gunsmiths

 

"Support your local gunsmith; Shoot something till it breaks!"

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fetish farb- a girl who is dressed by her S.O. in his take on women of the period which is filtered through his personal fantasies. Or particular to 20th century time periods, women who come to events with the impression of a pin up girl.

 

farby girl / farb ho- a woman who comes to re-enactments to hook up and due to others low standards and the over whelming odds in her favor, she is generally sucessful

 

Farb sitter- A wife or girlfriend who comes to an event for the sole purpose of watching over their SO and making sure he does not even enjoy himself a little, their impression is generally atrocious and they are amongst the most frustrating of the female farbs

 

Farbette/ she farb- a woman who comes out in a terrible impression that she acknowledges is wrong but was deliberately chosen because she feels it is more flattering to her, (for example I encountered a large woman who would only wear 50's style full skirted clothes because she felt it made her waist look smaller and was "close enough") or more comfortable, or cheaper.

 

Farblet- a child brought to an event and dressed by farby parents as a solider, medic or other inappropriate impression. These kids are blameless.

 

fantasy farb- a person at an event with an impression that is built straight out of their personal fantasies and has very little to do with actual history. Their impressions are generally very elaborate and multi layered with lots of explanatory stories to justify everything. Listening to these farbs interpret their impression requires a chair, popcorn, and a stiff drink.

 

-Sarah

I'm always looking for WW2 and Korean War era women's services and home front items. Particularly anything USMCWR or War Correspondent related.

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