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The New York Conspicuous Service Cross.


Medalman90

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As far as collecting goes, I've always felt that this is an underrated award. If anyone has any, please share them here. Here's one I just acquired. I'd like to thank all the members who assisted me on and off the forum with this one.

 

Conspicuous Service Cross #13026 to Private 1st Class Grover C. Sullivan.

 

 

Grover Sullivan was born September 21st 1892 in Norwood, New York. At the age of 18 Grover was working as head breakman on the New York Central Rail Road. On October 16th 1910, train no 95 is heading from Watertown to Norwood. As the train is passing through the Norwood Station Mr. Sullivan goes to grab a message, as he does this he loses his footing and falls off the train. He was very lucky to only receive minor injuries as the accident could have killed him.

 

The year is now 1918 and Grover is drafted into service. He was assigned to L Company, 306th Infantry Regiment, 77th Infantry Division. Private Sullivan was fortunate to not be amongst the men of the "Lost Battalion", however he would have his own trial by fire.

 

On November 5th 1918 at the crossroads in La Besace, Private Sullivan displayed rare bravery and devotion to duty by remaining on duty after being seriously wounded during a heavy artillery bombardment and giving first-aid treatment to five severely wounded comrades. For his extraordinary

gallantry and subsequent wounding, Pvt. Sullivan was awarded the Purple Heart and was also nominated for a Silver Star but this was upgraded to a Distinguished Service Cross. Grover was Discharged April 1st, 1919 as a Private 1st Class and returned to his job at the Rail Road.

 

On July 7th, 1942 Grover was working near the Messena Station. While climbing the ladder of a box car, that same one was being switched. As this was happening, he fell and fractured his hip. On November 10th 1960, Grover Sullivan is now a conductor, his assignment is the train from Massena to Syracuse. At 8:55 AM, a car tries to run the R.R. crossing at Peck Road, a mile outside the town of Richland. Unable to stop both vehicles collide, the driver was killed instantly.

 

Grover C. Sullivan passed on April 27th 1971 and is buried in the Calvary Cemetery in Norwood.

 

 

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Thanks for sharing that story Medalman ... How many more of those heroes fade into history? Its a shame.

 

Jim

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Neat medal. I've long felt that they are under appreciated. Your medal appears to be a replacement that was issued in 1965. (The design was slightly different on the WWI era medals.) Also nice that Sullivan was awarded the Croix de Guerre with gilt star in addition to the DSC.

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Thanks Guys!

 

Adam you are correct, mine is the latter. But I think he was just entitled to a second one rather than it being a replacement. I've seen the CSCs awarded multiple times to one person in the past. I could be wrong but medals that were reissued were marked "duplicate" on the award card. I actually forgot about the CDG, thank you for bringing that to my attention.

 

Yours is a fine example. You don't always see US personal with soviet awards, awesome find.

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To keep the thread going.

 

CSC #9 to Lt. Colonel John F. McDonough.

 

 

Born September 9th, 1906 in Brooklyn. John F. McDonough enlisted as a Private in October in 1923 and served in the 27th Division throughout his career in the N.Y. National Guard. When America inevitably joined the fight against the Axis powers, McDonough was a Lt. Colonel and was sent to the pacific.

 

His baptism of fire was leading the 2nd Battalion of the 165th Infantry Regiment on the attack and capture of the Makin Atoll in November 1943. The landings didn't go as planned. The Japanese made a tactical withdrawal inland from Lt. Col. McDonough's forces on Yellow Beach and completely ignored the landings on Red Beach, Forcing the 27th to combat each hard point one at a time. Communications with the tanks were also bad. McDonough left the Battalions Command Post and personally directed his tanks on foot, in the field. He also directed the attack on the Western Tank Barrier. Lt. Colonel McDonough's Silver Star Citation reads the follows;

 

"For: In the Southwest Pacific area during the period November 20-24, 1943. After completing a difficult flanking attack in the face of heavy fire, Lt. Col. McDonough lead his infantry battalion in the establishment of a beachhead. Under constant fire from well concealed enemy elements, he brought his mission to a successful conclusion."

 

The date is now June 16th 1944, D-Day plus 1 for the fighting in the Marianas. The Lt. Col. and his seasoned veterans land on Saipan, to support the 2nd and 4th Marine Divisions. The fighting was intense for the island. The capture of the Aslito Air Field and Mount Tapochau, GI's gave it many nick names like "Purple Heart Ridge" and "Death Valley". It was here where McDonough would not only receive his second Silver Star, but a wound as well. He is sent to a hospital on Staten Island to heal. After his recovery, John is reunited with his unit and sent to Okinawa for one final assault.

 

Lt. Colonel John F. McDonough was a highly distinguished warrior and a bold leader. From the Gilbert Islands to Shuri Castle, and Ryan Ridge; He conducted and composed himself in the matter that kept with high standards and tradition with the U.S. Army. John was discharged in 1946 at the rank of Colonel. Sadly, He passed away in 1956. He is buried in the Long Island National Cemetery in Farmingdale.

 

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All of the Tiffany & Co. crosses are numbered as issued but as with most medals there are exceptions to the rule. Here is one that is especially interesting because it is an unnumbered Tiffany strike. This one came from an old Tiffany salesman's sample box so the ring & suspension were never added. I have included some close-ups since this one is unique.

 

 

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The Tiffany strikes were imo the most beautifully crafted. It's funny what ends up on the market. You would think something like this would have ended up being collected and either destroyed or locked away in a company storage facility. Very unusual and interesting. Thanks for posting MilitaryWired!

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98 years ago today.

 

Engineman 1st Class Otto F. Bruckman.

 

Otto was born March 16th, 1893 in New York New York. He enlisted in the Navy in October of 1913 at age of 20. In the beginning of 1917, Bruckman served briefly on the battleships USS Michigan and Ohio until being assigned on the USS Solace for four months. After being stationed on a Hospital ship for 6 months and in receiving for one, Otto was assigned to the USS Cuyama, a refueling tanker (pictured above).

 

During the year of 1918, the Cuyama's mission was to deliver "war cargo" to England. The ship would make 6 voyages to and from the UK. It was on one of these trips that the 25 year old sailor showed great zeal and meritorious service. On September 19th, 1918, an ammonia feed pipe of the refrigerating system broke discharging a tank full of ammonia into the engine room. Engineman 1st Class Bruckman was one of a party of 5 who entered the engine room full of ammonia, rescued those overcome by the fumes, and did repair work, thus risking his life. Ottos actions awarded him the Navy Cross.

 

After the war, Otto served for another year on the U.S.S. Cuyama being a part of the supply fleet in the Caribbean until being discharged in October 1919. Mr. Bruckman then joined the WPA as a roofer and renovated Fort Totten in Bayside N.Y.

 

Otto Bruckman died July 5th, 1970 and is buried in the Long Island National Cemetery in Farmingdale.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is a rare example of a CSC awarded to a female recipient. The medals is a WWII type however Nurse Hosken earned it during WWI. The award was based on the prior award of a Meritorious Service Citation Certificate (MSCC) and Purple Heart. Unfortunately the number on the CSC is in a block of numbers for which the NY state award cards are missing.

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Daniel J. Rimoncelli, PFC, Second Infantry Division. Awarded the Purple Heart, Victory Medal, EAME, GCM and this NYS Conspicuous Service Cross.

 

 

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Adam, you have to love some of these retroactive awards. this is the first example I have ever seen issued to a woman. Super cool! Very fortunate that it's named other wise we would have never known who this one belonged to.

 

12A54, the engraving on yours is exquisite. Both of you have truly outstanding named examples. One day I will add one that's named into my collection.

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Medalman, I am glad to see the Empire State so ably represented by you. Thank you for the invitation to show some NY CSCs. Here are a few of the ones I have found.

 

Walter H. Hammer Jr. was born in 1924 in Brooklyn. CSC #1837 awarded in 1946 on the basis of a Silver Star he earned 19 February 1945 on Iwo Jima as a 20 year old heavy machine gun operator in the 4th Marine Division. Mr. Hammer passed away in 2008.

 

 

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Always looking for Purple Hearts issued to New York men or any WWI Purple Hearts for 27th Division and 77th Division men.

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Richard Fagan served in combat in Nicaragua and China and in WWII was Battalion Commander of the 1st Marine Parachute Regiment at Bougainville. On Iwo Jima he served as Commanding Officer of 3/26 Marines. His CSC #3616 was awarded in 1947 on the basis of earning the Navy Cross 24 February 1945 on Iwo Jima. He is the Marine on the left in the photo.

 

 

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Always looking for Purple Hearts issued to New York men or any WWI Purple Hearts for 27th Division and 77th Division men.

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Fred Rulfs was a member of the “Fighting 69th” Regiment (less colorfully known as the 165th Infantry in the Regular Army). He was born in 1899 in NYC and passed away in 1971. His first issue CSC #8255 was awarded in 1949 on the basis of severe wounds he received on the first day of the St. Mihiel Offensive 12 September 1918.

 

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Always looking for Purple Hearts issued to New York men or any WWI Purple Hearts for 27th Division and 77th Division men.

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Royal Cowan was born in 1898, a native of NYC. He enlisted in the Air Corp in WWI and served as a pilot in the 24th Aero Squadron. His Tiffany CSC #1592 was issued in 1922 on the basis of a Silver Star Citation (later converted to Silver Star #16821). The Silver Star citation was awarded for gallantry while on photo recon 30 October 1918. He flew a Salmson 2-seater and is credited with on aerial “kill” of a “Fokker”. Cowan relocated to Dallas after the war and died there in 1989.

 

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Always looking for Purple Hearts issued to New York men or any WWI Purple Hearts for 27th Division and 77th Division men.

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Sidney F. Cheviot was a pre-war member of the 22nd Engineers in the New York National Guard. His unit was Federalized as the 102nd Engineers of the 27th “New York” Division. He was wounded in action 17 October 1918 and was awarded the Purple Heart (location of the medal unknown). Cheviot was born in 1894 and died in 1954 and was a lifelong New Yorker. He was also my grandfather. Pvt. Cheviot’s first issue CSC #8735 is the current version of the CSC medal of New York, pictured with its official but understated case of issue. After months of pestering by his grandson, it was issued by the State of New York in May of 2011, along with the CSC Certificate signed by Governor Cuomo.

 

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Always looking for Purple Hearts issued to New York men or any WWI Purple Hearts for 27th Division and 77th Division men.

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