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Mel Gibsons new WWII movie- Hacksaw ridge


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" I wonder what he would think of this effort?"

 

Me too. We, in my opinion. were very fortunate that some of the major participants at Hamburger Hill were still around to comment thuswise about "We Were Soldiers..."

 

"We Were Soldiers" was about Ia Drang, not Hamburger Hill...

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We finally got out to go see it on Tuesday night when all movies are $5.

 

I would highly recommend it to everyone. Based on previous comments I would think all these historical errors were blatant which they were not. I barely noticed anything the main being how Vince Vaughn was their Sarge from basic to the front lines.

 

The message of the movie is wonderfully uplifting and the plot is engrossing. I will most likely be adding this to my Blu Ray collection as well.

 

I would recommend that it be seen on the big screen for the full effect of the battlefield scenes, which can be gruesome but what I would imagine to be realistic.

 

All in all a super movie.

-Brian

 

 

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I think the image of the drill sergeant leading men from basic to combat is a leftover from the 1940-1941 national guard call up. Members of the National Guard were placed on federal duty then completed basic training as a unit with draftees assigned as needed to fill units. NCOs from the Regular Army and Organized Reserve were used as "drill sergeants" during this time.

 

Even once "basic training" was standardized in 1941-1942 it was short; Audey Murphy had only 8 weeks of basic and infantry training when he was assigned to the 3rd Infantry Division. When he completed his training his superiors tried to send him to baker's training; I take it this meant once you were "trained" you still needed training from your unit to be considered ready for deployment. This is what Organized Reserve units like the 77th Infantry Division did during the war; training.

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I really enjoyed it. That first moment of contact in combat, my sphincter nearly chewed through the seat!

The equipment inconsistencies didn't bother me, but the historical inaccuracies did. I think, for whatever reason, they actually undersold Doss' accomplishments on Okinawa. And knowing his real story makes you wonder why they had to make any changes to it, before the war and during.

 

That being said, I don't know if his dad actually had PTSD, or even served in WWI, but the character in the movie was very sympathetic, and it was the first time I'd seen that addressed.

 

Okay, so whoever mentioned Vince Vaughn's tiny helmet - I could NOT help staring at that the entire time. Either he has an enormous head, or wore a green Dixie cup. It looks like he's wearing a toy.

 

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Okay, so whoever mentioned Vince Vaughn's tiny helmet - I could NOT help staring at that the entire time. Either he has an enormous head, or wore a green Dixie cup. It looks like he's wearing a toy.

I'm sure it's a big head. I look pretty much the same when I ever wear a GI pot as I got a big noggin, too.

I would bet that actor Andrew Garfield wears a hat size of less than a 7...

Lee Bishop Formerly known as "Ratchet 5" with the 2nd Infantry Division (yes, in REAL life)

US WW2 War Correspondent collector

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I watched this over the weekend. While it was a great movie of a great soldier one thought kept going thru my mind. Why didn't anyone at the bottom of the ridge climb the rope to help him? It was obvious wounded were left on the ridge and not one other person climbed up there to help?

 

...Kat

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I guess I'm the only one that disliked the movie. Once a character picked up a dead body to use as cover I disliked it. LOL don't crucify me.

I understand what you're saying. As Sherman said "war is hell". However this film seemed to be too much "brave heart" (gore for gore sake) and too much "passion of the Christ" (when he's lowered down the cliff with God shining down). I'm glade I saw it, but like you it felt a little too "on the nose" persay.

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I understand what you're saying. As Sherman said "war is hell". However this film seemed to be too much "brave heart" (gore for gore sake) and too much "passion of the Christ" (when he's lowered down the cliff with God shining down). I'm glade I saw it, but like you it felt a little too "on the nose" persay.

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There were parts I did like, for example during the trial when his father walks in with his WWI Uniform on etc and is respected by the higher ups.

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I EXTREMELY disliked this movie I’m sorry to say. Battle scenes were horrendous. How it could be compared to Saving Private Ryan, I have no idea.

 

 

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There were parts I did like, for example during the trial when his father walks in with his WWI Uniform on etc and is respected by the higher ups.

 

I don't think that actually happened (as the issues with his Father were doctored to be more interesting), or even would have. Sure, the WW2 vets did have respect for the "Great War" ones and some of them were also back in service as 'retreads', but I can't help but wonder how much would be accorded in such a case as this had it happened.

 

Lee Bishop Formerly known as "Ratchet 5" with the 2nd Infantry Division (yes, in REAL life)

US WW2 War Correspondent collector

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I doubt that actually happened too. The father's character in that movie made no sense to me. The father was so traumatized and bitter about the war that he drank heavily and was furious when his son joined the army. The father was incredibly angry about the war the waste and the death of his friends. Yet despite all that anger and bitterness he kept a perfectly clean and pressed full uniform and pristine medals carefully preserved. That just seemed like a totally unrealistic depiction of a combat soldier dealing with anger and bitterness.

 

I have known some bitter veterans and none of them cared to talk about their wars let alone keep their uniforms and medals. The uniforms, if they were kept were usually used as work clothes most were just thrown away and if the medals did survive they usually ended up tossed in a drawer, not lovingly preserved.

 

Some guys coped with service better than others and kept things as a reminder, but the father's bitter, angry character didn't seem like that type that wanted reminders. I can understand the father wanting to help his son and contacting his old CO but the WWI uniform part was just stupid. It was a dumb movie.

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In films, we each and all "like" and "dislike" certain parts.

 

Together though, we watch it all, so as to see those special parts.

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