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Mel Gibsons new WWII movie- Hacksaw ridge


Mr.Jerry
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The purpose of the movie, is to strengthen our values. We are loosing so much, with these Millenniums. Principals In God, this country was based on.

Yeah the reloading and helmet liner issue was notice. But I really like the movie, because it was based on a true story.

We need more of this.

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Just because someone makes a WW2 movie, it doesn't mean we collectively need to get our knickers in a twist every time someone says anything other than it was the best thing since sliced bread.

 

 

This is not what I believe others are saying. It is fine to discuss a movie but why is it that EVERY time a new war movie comes out, the rivet counters start complaining about the gear?

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Geeze, I sure didn't mean to start this.

 

I commented that I found a few trivial things to be distracting. I found them distracting because, being a little bit of a collector / military history person they caught my attention right away. This being a militaria forum, I thought others might find the humor in my griping.

 

I think I'll go crawl back into my foxhole now.... (Haha)

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Geeze, I sure didn't mean to start this.

 

I commented that I found a few trivial things to be distracting. I found them distracting because, being a little bit of a collector / military history person they caught my attention right away. This being a militaria forum, I thought others might find the humor in my griping.

 

I think I'll go crawl back into my foxhole now.... (Haha)

 

You didn't start it. No one is pointing fingers at you. Don't crawl back into your foxhole. :) I think you were just the straw that broke the camel's back. ;)

 

...Kat

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I know a few people that worked on this,wardrobe,hardware and so on.

 

Anything wrong was pointed out to the "higher ups" before the cameras rolled and ignored.

 

I used to work in the film industry and I can vouch for this mindset. It's almost always the producers/directors who don't care if something is wrong, because a) there isn't time to fix it, and/or b ) it's not in the budget to get the right thing, and/or c) "I don't give a **** if it's wrong. Roll camera."

 

I mean, it does make some degree of sense... not everything has to be absolutely perfect, especially if you know that 99.9% of your audience isn't die hard militaria enthusiasts and won't give a rat's patootie that a certain type of helmet liner wouldn't exist for another 20 years.

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I used to work in the film industry and I can vouch for this mindset. It's almost always the producers/directors who don't care if something is wrong, because a) there isn't time to fix it, and/or b ) it's not in the budget to get the right thing, and/or c) "I don't give a **** if it's wrong. Roll camera."

 

I mean, it does make some degree of sense... not everything has to be absolutely perfect, especially if you know that 99.9% of your audience isn't die hard militaria enthusiasts and won't give a rat's patootie that a certain type of helmet liner wouldn't exist for another 20 years.

 

Agreed. After dealing with a low-budget military film once, I decided never again to be involved in a mess like that. the big budget stuff doesn't fare much better. Yeah, there are exceptions where all the detail stuff looks great ("generation Kill," "Fury" and "Red Tails" pop into mind, even though the latter had a laughable script), but they are indeed exceptions.

Frankly, the liners didn't bug me nearly as much as the hand grenade pins being pulled by teeth (geez, I thought that went out when John Wayne passed away), or the basic training cadre being the exact same people who led the very same soldiers into combat.

As I walked out, I heard a woman ask the man with her, "Hey, did that look strange to you that they were pulling hand grenade pins with their teeth? Wouldn't that be really tough to do?" Now, if SHE noticed that, the rest of us for sure did.

 

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Okay, one more time... Why didn't the Japanese simply cut the rope ladder loose? Of all the film's glaring inconsistencies with what might have actually happened, this seems to be the biggest one for me. They knew it was there, why didn't they cut it?

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Okay, one more time... Why didn't the Japanese simply cut the rope ladder loose? Of all the film's glaring inconsistencies with what might have actually happened, this seems to be the biggest one for me. They knew it was there, why didn't they cut it?

 

That's a fair question. I'm not entirely sure that a rope ladder ever truly existed in this battle, but for the sake of the movie, let's just say that Navy artillery kept them at bay. I don't know. :)

 

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I saw it yesterday and was overall happy with the movie. Yes, the pulling of grenade pins with the teeth did not go unnoticed, nor did some of the uniform flaws. The battle scenes were hectic and hard to keep up with but I'm guessing that was true in real life too. Hollywood will always add Hollywood to a movie...it's just their thing. That being said, go see the movie or wait for it to come out on DVD. I don't think you'll feel cheated. I will add the DVD to my WWII collection when it comes out. It is most definitely not another Windtalkers. :( Let's hope no one ever makes another one of those!

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For the Cargo net question, I saw this recently:

 

(Although this doesn't address why it wasn't cut down by the Japanese, it does show they did use a cargo net).

 

http://www.historyvshollywood.com/reelfaces/hacksaw-ridge/

 

Did they really use cargo nets to ascend the ridge?

Yes, and medic Desmond Doss was one of the three men who volunteered to go up the ridge and hang

the cargo nets (something not shown in the movie).

They were the same cargo nets that the men had used to climb down from the army personnel carriers

into the landing crafts that took them ashore.

In the photo below, Desmond is seen standing on top of the ridge. The photo doesn't convey the sheer danger he was in up there.

The photographer refused to get any closer for fear he would be hit by Japanese fire.

-The Conscientious Objector Documentary

 

Desmond Doss on top of Maeda Escarpment

The real Desmond Doss stands on the edge of a cliff at the top of the Maeda Escarpment

as his comrades ascend a cargo net (left).

The height of the cliff in question was exaggerated for the Hacksaw Ridge movie (right).

 

post-13304-0-08524600-1478569847_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Art, and yes that explains it... I figured as much on the exaggeration part myself. So roughly, 1/3 or 1/2 at best of what is shown in the film. That makes sense.

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Art,

I also thank you for the info. I was also wondering about the net thing and how easy it'd been for the Japanese to just find cover about 20 yards from the edge of pick off everyone as they came up.

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We're not going to like it? Uh oh... time for a new thread!

I jumped the gun but I like most all War movies...I don't regret watching it.
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Okay, maybe a dumb question since I haven't seen the movie and don't know all the details of the real story.... but, did the Japanese even know there was a cargo net there?

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I heard that one was really bad.. I want to see it but don't want to be disappointed, and I have high hopes since it's Indy related.

 

-Brian

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Saw "Hacksaw Ridge" yesterday with a buddy. Crowded theater for a Monday afternoon matinee. I believe we were the only 2 folks at the show that recognized the non-WWII M-1 helmets. Did notice the absence of a single samurai sword attacker and didn't hear one "BANZAI" yell! Thought it a real good film and outstanding tribute to a true American hero and man of principles. I give the film a strong B+ in the technical recreation of the era for both U.S. and Japanese. If you're into military history, go see it. My 2-cents. Bobgee

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Screamingeagles101

I saw it last night, and if I can say one thing about this movie: Gruesome.

It is absolutely the most gruesome movie I've ever seen & I'm a 19 year old who sees a lot of movies. Unlike other war movies, it really depicts the horrors of war.

 

I don't know what else I can say about it with the exception that it was one of the best war films I've seen. In fact, I would rank it number 1. The trailer makes it look a little cheesy but it really isn't. It was so gruesome, there were some parts I had to turn away. I couldn't bare to watch.

 

Unbeleivable movie. You won't know what I mean until you see this movie. Go!!!!!!!!!!

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Saw it last night with my wife.

 

Suspension of disbelief can be an intense experience, full of lessons, as this film is.

 

Question for helmet experts:

Painted or stenciled on left side of the fighting units' helmets there was often a sort of elongated tenge geometric shape, formed of what looked like red dashes. I saw these especially clearly before the first assault on the escarpment... naturally after that as the battle raged, not so much.

 

What was that shape, what did it signify?

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