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M-1967 Modernized Load-Carrying Equipment, 1968-1975


sgtmonroe
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The next few images [i will post one image per post with description] I am putting up are original U.S. Army images [albeit scanned copies] that show the development of the M-1967 MLCE as well as the ALICE system. All nylon items pictured here were developed during the Vietnam War under the LINCLOE program.

 

The first image is of a soldier wearing the prototype LINCLOE individual equipment that eventually became the M-1967 MLCE [adopted on 15 March 1967]. The items worn are the same items pictured in the 1970 Hot Weather Technical Manual. Of note are the prototype suspenders [they differ from the production ones and appear similar to the USMC version], nylon M14 small arms ammunition cases, and the nylon M-1956-type intrenching tool carrier. The far right image shows the prototype aluminum frame for the large rucksack that was not adopted with the M-1967 MLCE - but it would later serve for the basis for the large LC-1 ALICE field pack.

 

LINCLOE01.jpg

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After the M-1967 MLCE is adopted further developments continue. During 1968 several items are developed and tested including a combat vest, a plastic quick release buckle for the individual equipment belt [just a plastic version of the Davis buckle], the nylon intrenching tool carrier with snap closures and bayonet attachment [like the one Keystone owns], a large field pack and frame, and a small field pack [designed to replace the "butt pack"].

 

The following images [circa 1969] are of the combat vest with individual equipment items attached. Shown is the prototype plastic buckle, prototype rubber e-tool carrier [development began in 1969], and the "large" first aid pouch [designed to carry 2 field dressings - also developed in 1969].

 

LINCLOE02.jpg

 

LINCLOE03.jpg

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The next image [also circa 1969] shows the small and large field packs and frame for large field pack. The small field pack was eventually scrapped before the adoption of the ALICE system in 1973 but was developed to the point where it was assigned the National Stock Number 8465-00-001-6479. The resemblance of this large field pack compared to the final LC-1 ALICE large field pack can be seen.

 

LINCLOE04.jpg

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In July of 1969 the above items were tested at Ft Benning, Ft Lee, Ft Clayton, and Ft Greely. Some changes were made to the equipment prior to the testing. These are as follows:

  • the individual equipment belt's middle row of eyelets was elimated and the single hook adjustment was replaced by double hook adjustment that engaged the top and bottom rows of eyelets

  • the quick release buckles on the vest front were replaced with hook and pile and snap fastners

  • plastic slide keepers were utilized - like those pictured on the canteen cover Keystone posted earlier

  • the new molded EVA e-tool carrier was also tested

At this point all snap closures are still plastic. During the above testing which ended 19 July 1969 it was finally determined that the plastic snap closure was completely unsuitable. All future designs would incorporate metal snap fastners.

 

I will post more images and information in the next few days that include the US ARMY development of the 30-round small arms ammunition case WITH INNER FLAPS - no this was not a USMC only item as most have been led to believe.

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On 06 August 1969 Natick Labs along with U.S. Army represenatives evaluated the LINCLOE testing of July 1969. They also looked at the performance, so far, of the M-1967 MLCE in Vietnam. The meeting was to decide what characteristics were desireable for the new nylon load carrying system. Between the LINCLOE tests and M-1967 MLCE the following was determined:

 

(1) Individual Equipment Belt - should have quick-release buckle and simple adjustment system [by eliminating the middle row of adjustment eyelets].

(2) Individual Equipment Belt Suspenders - the combat vest concept was too complicated and prone to failure a simple suspender system was deceided to be more efficient.

(3) Water Canteen Cover - the M-1967 MLCE was decided as the best solution.

(4) Intrenching Tool Carrier - the EVA is still considered better than nylon - due to durability.

(5) Small Arms Ammunition Case - the M-1967 MLCE 30-round case was decided as superior but it required some way of dividing the magazines internally as well as a better way of retaining grenades on the exterior.

(6) Field Pack - the Tropical Rucksack was determined to be too small - the board decided that both a small field pack and large field pack [with removable frame] were superior.

(7) Vests - the M79 vest was still a good design. Also a M60 gunner's vest [which had been tested earlier - an image of the vest appears in Stanton's Vietnam uniform book] was also considered a good idea.

 

With these revisions proposed for the new load-carrying systems development and testing began in the early months of 1970. On 15 April 1970 the new load-carrying system was unveiled for more testing [see image below].

 

The new load-carrying system consisted of [pictured below]:

 

A Individual Equipment Belt - with Davis quick release buckle, two rows of eyelets, and new clinch-buckle adjustment system.

B Individual Equipment Belt Suspenders - new "Y" version

C Intrenching Tool Carrier - EVA version

D Water Canteen Cover - new version with no bottom - the bottom of the canteen cover was a strip of nylon webbing - this allowed for drainage - a couple of these appeared on eBay a few years ago - but I was not able to bid on them [again they were too high for my budget] - these water canteen covers were assigned the NSN 8465-00-001-6472.

E First Aid Dressing Case - enlarged version to carry two field dressings. Assigned the NSN 8465-00-001-6473.

F Small Arms Ammunition Cases - with internal divider flaps with snap closures - the so-called LINCLOE small arms ammunition cases.

 

Other items were the small field pack, large field pack, field pack frame, and the two vests.

 

LINCLOE05.jpg

 

The above individual equipment system was developed during 1970. In August of 1971 test sets were sent to Ft Benning, Ft Greely, Ft Devens, and to the USMC in Quantico for field testing. By March of 1972 shortcomings and deficiencies are determined. These were submitted for correction and testing resumed in June of 1972.

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In October 1972 testing was completed and further developments were considered. By December of 1972 all deficiencies were corrected and further modifications were made to the system. The term M-1972 Individual Load-Carrying Equipment [LLCE] was utilized and the system was officially type classified as Standard A on 17 January 1973. Of course the system would be later renamed ALICE.

 

The following final design changes were made from testing evaluations submitted on 24 November 1972:

 

(1) Individual Equipment Belt - the Davis quick-release buckle was discarded for the hook and loop buckle.

(2) Individual Equipment Belt Suspenders - the length was increased by 4 inches. It should also be noted that pairs were tested with the "quick-release" strap utilized on the field pack suspenders but it was decided that this was not neccessary.

(3) Intrenching Tool Carrier - no changes to the EVA version

(4) Field First Aid Dressing Case - the smaller M-1967 MLCE version was decided to be a better alternative to the large version.

(5) Water Canteen Cover - the closure flaps were reinforced; the open bottom was replaced with a closed bottom with drain hole [the open bottom was determined to be a security risk as the canteen cup could be seen and may reflect light]; an inner reinforcement band was added to help keep the canteen cup lip from rubbing through the fabric.

(6) Small Arms Ammunition Case - the inner flaps were eliminated as they impeded the rapid removal of magazines - small divider strips were utilized instead.

 

The small and large pack were elimated and replaced with a medium field pack and frame. The M60 vest was also eliminated. Sometime after these tests the large field pack was reintroduced as part of the system and adopted.

 

The final results of the LINCLOE program - circa December 1972:

 

LINCLOE06.jpg

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I should point out something I found in my years of research. In Rottman's Infantry Equipments book by Osprey, Volstad illustrates a "Contra Field Pack" with the ALICE systems items. Rottman comments that the pack was provided to the Contras by the US goverment. The pack illustrated is actually the experimetal LINCLOE small field pack.

 

Also the last picture posted of the final LINCLOE equipment [ALICE] appears a number of times in PS Magazine when ALICE equipment components are described.

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sgtmonroe: I dont know where but in this forum found some pictures about developing ALICE rucksack. Is this small pack same as you posted on picture?

 

Yes it is. The small field pack pictured in the images from Leatherneck magazine is the LINCLOE small field pack sent by the Army to the USMC in 1970 for their own testing.

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  • 1 month later...
Salvage Sailor
F Small Arms Ammunition Cases - with internal divider flaps with snap closures - the so-called LINCLOE small arms ammunition cases.

 

LINCLOE05.jpg

 

The above individual equipment system was developed during 1970. In August of 1971 test sets were sent to Ft Benning, Ft Greely, Ft Devens, and to the USMC in Quantico for field testing. By March of 1972 shortcomings and deficiencies are determined. These were submitted for correction and testing resumed in June of 1972.

 

Not an uncommon item & I'm certain many or all of you have seen these before. But, for the sake of illustration on this topic:

 

The final result - 1973 issue LINCLOE pouch

 

CASE, SMALL ARMS

AMMUNITION, 30-ROUND

MAGAZINE (M-16 RIFLES)

8465-464-2084

DSA 100-73-C-1461

REMAR,INC

 

I've had this set since mid 1977 when I got them during joint USN/USMC manuevers at Numazu, Japan

IMG_2707.JPG

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I wonder if this could be the Army M-1967 buttpack.

 

No button straps at the back but two sewn on tabs. I took the picks a few weeks ago and now have found this topic, for more pistures I have to dig it out again.

 

IMG_6463.jpg

IMG_6464.jpg

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I wonder if this could be the Army M-1967 buttpack.

 

No button straps at the back but two sewn on tabs. I took the picks a few weeks ago and now have found this topic, for more pistures I have to dig it out again.

 

Looks right.

 

Any markings under the flap? Could be the USMC M-1967 field pack. The USMC ones are usually marked USMC in the contract/nomenclature stamp.

 

Either way...its RARE!

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Looks right.

 

Any markings under the flap? Could be the USMC M-1967 field pack. The USMC ones are usually marked USMC in the contract/nomenclature stamp.

 

Either way...its RARE!

 

No, it is not the USMC 1970 back. I have that one also but this one is different.

Will post more pictures in the days to come...

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sgtmonroe: I dont know where but in this forum found some pictures about developing ALICE rucksack. Is this small pack same as you posted on picture?

 

 

I noticed that the large ruck has spring buckles. I have a nice 1975 medium ruck that has those type of buckles and can recall seeing a few other medium rucks with them, but I have never seen a large ruck with them. Has anyone else? Also the pic of the small ruck in the Osprey's book on US Army Equipment has Fastex buckles. I have wondered if that was a mistake the artist made. Thanks for all the great info and pics guys.

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I found this M-1967 butt pack a while ago, it has no legible markings, but for $4, who can complain?

 

IMG_0459.jpg

 

IMG_0460.jpg

 

IMG_0461.jpg

 

IMG_0462.jpg

 

It seems some ingenious serviceman fixed the torn eyelet with a couple grenade rings, a stronger repair me thinks.

 

IMG_0463.jpg

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I noticed that the large ruck has spring buckles. I have a nice 1975 medium ruck that has those type of buckles and can recall seeing a few other medium rucks with them, but I have never seen a large ruck with them. Has anyone else? Also the pic of the small ruck in the Osprey's book on US Army Equipment has Fastex buckles. I have wondered if that was a mistake the artist made. Thanks for all the great info and pics guys.

 

The "spring" buckles are used on ALICE packs [both medium and large] through the DSA100-76 contracts [FY1976]. Beginning with the DSA100-77 [FY1977] contracts the buckles are changed to the friction type. The early ALICE packs, with the "spring" buckles, are originally issued with the four pack liner bags. These are not supplied with the ALICE packs after the FY1976 contracts.

 

I have both a large and medium ALICE pack that are the earliest manufactured - both are first DSA100-74 contracts with Federal Stock Numbers [not later National Stock Numbers found on the second DSA100-74 contracts]. Both of them have the "spring" buckles.

 

I was mistaken, in a previous post, about the Volstad picture of the "small" pack in that book. I still have not figured what the heck it is supposed to be. Rottman's [who is known for not double checking his research] description states it is a "Contra Field Pack" supplied to the Contras by the U.S. That is possible, but I have found no other reference in any text to support that claim.

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craig_pickrall

I'm not at my reference material at the moment so I can't look at the Osprey book. There was a so called small ALICE pack sold through surplus stores in the 1980's. It looked good but was not an issue item. It was made in an Asian country but I can't recall which one without my references. It did not have Fastex buckles though. Some people called them Contra packs at that time too but I have no proof of that usage.

 

Most of the issue ALICE packs that you saw for sale in a surplus store had one or more bad spring buckles on it. That was probably the biggest cause of disposing of those packs. The buckles came apart in the field. I'm sure there were many field expediant methods of repair but the most common I saw was 550 cord.

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The "spring" buckles are used on ALICE packs [both medium and large] through the DSA100-76 contracts [FY1976]. Beginning with the DSA100-77 [FY1977] contracts the buckles are changed to the friction type. The early ALICE packs, with the "spring" buckles, are originally issued with the four pack liner bags. These are not supplied with the ALICE packs after the FY1976 contracts.

 

I have both a large and medium ALICE pack that are the earliest manufactured - both are first DSA100-74 contracts with Federal Stock Numbers [not later National Stock Numbers found on the second DSA100-74 contracts]. Both of them have the "spring" buckles.

 

I was mistaken, in a previous post, about the Volstad picture of the "small" pack in that book. I still have not figured what the heck it is supposed to be. Rottman's [who is known for not double checking his research] description states it is a "Contra Field Pack" supplied to the Contras by the U.S. That is possible, but I have found no other reference in any text to support that claim.

 

 

Thanks, Sgtmonroe, I will be on the lookout for a large ruck with those buckles. Any suggestions where I might find one? The only other reference to a "Contra Pack" I can think of was an article in an issue of Soldier of Fortune magazine. The issue was either late 1987 or early 1988. I think it was referred to as a "Little ALICE" pack. If memory serves, and believe me it might not, it looked more like a scaled down medium ALICE or maybe an ARVN Ranger rucksack. I will try to find those old magazines.

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I wonder if this could be the Army M-1967 buttpack.

 

No button straps at the back but two sewn on tabs. I took the picks a few weeks ago and now have found this topic, for more pistures I have to dig it out again.

 

IMG_6463.jpg

IMG_6464.jpg

that one here looks as a good M67 butt pack...how come that you'r not curious to see what's the markings under the flap???!!! pls open up the flap my son & tell as the good news its 1968 or 69... w00t.gif do you know how many arguments we'v had here in the forum for that shinola?...it was a real civil war :lol:

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that one here looks as a good M67 butt pack...how come that you'r not curious to see what's the markings under the flap???!!! pls open up the flap my son & tell as the good news its 1968 or 69... w00t.gif do you know how many arguments we'v had here in the forum for that shinola?...it was a real civil war :lol:

 

I will try to dig it out today but I´m sure there is no date but one or two faint stamps.

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