Jump to content

Why Do You Collect Mint/NOS Gear?


Jake the Collector

Recommended Posts

I like a little bit of both 'Mint and Salty"

 

for militaria collectables like firearms, I prefer the newest mint condition I can get, I prefer guns that are still fully functional, not just wall hangers

 

I prefer helmets that show use but not abuse or all rusted and dented and rotted out liners, I never buy fragile items that are about to fall apart when handled.

 

most of the stuff I collect has a very long shelf life since it's mostly steel helmets and bayonets, or canteens & field gear of some type

Link to post
Share on other sites

With named, salty field gear, even if it was used on later camping trips, at least there's a chance it achieved some of that wear in combat.

 

Mint / unissued field gear? Not so much.

Link to post
Share on other sites
everforward

If it's an ID'd piece it's just in whatever shape it shows up in...so it's just the nature of the artifact and it's history.

 

Old timers always taught me, 'Buy what you want, and buy condition...'

 

That has never failed me yet in almost 40 years of collecting....it holds true for uniforms and gear, but especially firearms.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Funny, I made the exact same comment earlier and everyone jumped on me for it...

 

 

I think that is a bit melodramatic. You made your opinion known about when and where things got their wear. Others made their opinion be known that they disagreed with your opinion. this was not exactly a pile-on occurring here but rather, a really good discussion all based on... you guessed it: opinions.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hello

 

I totally agree with you. This statement is also right overseas. I live in France. Just because you find a salty M-41 jacket at a garage sale does not mean it was left by a GI who forgot it in the farm in 1944.

 

I know a lot of famers who used US ww2 surplus until the 80's. When I see auctions on ebay entitled "combat use or field use" it makes me smile because you have more chance it was used in a corn field rather than in combat field. This is just a nice story to sell better.

When you think about it, what's the point of bringing back salty equipment for a GI ? It does not mean it did not exists but when your pants are worn out and you have plenty available it is pretty rare to keep the salty one.

 

Just my 2 cents

 

I Was thinking the same thing. I personally like unissued items because unless there is a name/story behind the salty piece of gear, chances are it was torn and worn out at Boyscout camp, so Id rather spend the extra few dollars on a nice example then a torn up rusty pouch. I may be picky, but thats how I collect.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jake the Collector

With named, salty field gear, even if it was used on later camping trips, at least there's a chance it achieved some of that wear in combat.

 

Mint / unissued field gear? Not so much.

I agree, and this is similar to what I was saying earlier. Yes, many worn out items with no concrete connection to a vet, if not most, can be attributed to postwar camping and hunting and boy scouts, but, the items being military issue items- items produced during a war- there still is a chance that the fading and scuffs and spots of dirt were received in the field hooked to the webbing of an infantryman. And no matter how slight that chance is, it's still a greater chance than any mint gear would have. Plus, as I said before, it's the wondering that's part of the fun, or at least to me it is.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will also add that I collect both mint and salty equipment. I do not mind making a battle of the bulge display with salty gear but I only want mint or very good condition dress uniforms. This is to be as close as possible of what happened during ww2. I do not imagine a soldier wearing a stained, moth hole eaten dress uniform.

 

Again, that's just my way of collecting. This is a hobby first. If you are only happy with salty uniforms, that's great too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Seems to me that people asking why a collector would want the best condition example of an item they're wanting is just looking to justify their beat up and worn out items that they didn't want to spend a little more to get something in great condition.

 

 

That statement might apply to you, but I have some mint examples, and they just don't hold my interest as much as the items that have had some use.

They seem to have more character.

And I can afford to buy, in most cases anyway, items in whatever condition I can find.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jake the Collector

I will also add that I collect both mint and salty equipment. I do not mind making a battle of the bulge display with salty gear but I only want mint or very good condition dress uniforms. This is to be as close as possible of what happened during ww2. I do not imagine a soldier wearing a stained, moth hole eaten dress uniform.

 

Again, that's just my way of collecting. This is a hobby first. If you are only happy with salty uniforms, that's great too.

Very good points. I agree.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested to know if what era someone collects has any bearing on whether they collect used or mint or both types of field gear. I know most (not all) modern collectors go after used items. Just wondering.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested to know if what era someone collects has any bearing on whether they collect used or mint or both types of field gear. I know most (not all) modern collectors go after used items. Just wondering.

 

As someone who researches "modern" equipments (I do not collect, instead I acquire for study) I always try and find unissued material, especially if the material was originally issued in some type of packaging. Helps identify when, where, and who manufactured the item, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello All, Anyone who has read my posts in the past know that my passion is collecting mint/unissued WWII militaria. I can't fully explain why I am drawn to the mint stuff, but as an Engineer, I like to collect the various patterns of an item to see how the design evolves. Instead of collecting many examples of an item and it's variations, I collect one mint, unissued example of each pattern, if possible. Having the original markings, QM Tags etc. makes this much easier and a mint NOS example guarantees that nothing was added or removed from the item variation after it left the factory. Of course my collection still has many used and named items in it, but these are the exception and normally I stumbled into them for prices I just couldn't refuse. I have an advertisement in a small local newspaper that is the main source for the veteran acquired, used and named items. The prices are always fair and many of the veterans or their families will just give me items, since they trust I will give them a good home. The advantage of being a fairly well known WWII collector/local boy here in Ohio.

 

In closing, my opinions on collecting by condition is "Judge not, lest ye be judged" and "If it floats your boat, collect it" so sayeth the Rambob.

 

Cheers,

 

 

Bob

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jumpin Jack

Bob, I agree with you totally. Our experience seems to follow a like course. It has caused me to think back when. I'll pick a year--1946. I live three blocks from Walter Reed Army Hospital, and was there every day to visit the returned wounded soldiers. It gave me an opportunity to visit the tailor shop where they sewed on new insignia. At the base of the sewing machine of each seamstress was a large cardboard box where they threw in the old insignia. They allowed me to take what I wanted. I would then move on to the attic lofts that housed the field gear, boots, etc. Bin after bin piled high, each with its particular grouping--canteens, helmets, web belts, etc. Again, I was allowed to take what I wanted. All this stimulated my desire to collect on one hand, and to become a professional soldier on the other. Back then, there was no such thing as a "mint" item. Unfortunately, there also was no way to glean the story that went with the items. This changed over the years when contact with Vets turned into an interview process. Thus, for me, mint for research, and used for the story. Jack

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, and this is similar to what I was saying earlier. Yes, many worn out items with no concrete connection to a vet, if not most, can be attributed to postwar camping and hunting and boy scouts, but, the items being military issue items- items produced during a war- there still is a chance that the fading and scuffs and spots of dirt were received in the field hooked to the webbing of an infantryman. And no matter how slight that chance is, it's still a greater chance than any mint gear would have. Plus, as I said before, it's the wondering that's part of the fun, or at least to me it is.

The problem us modern collectors are going to have eventually is with the airsoft/paintball crowd. These players go out using uniforms and gear playing their games and it gets torn up. Sometimes they use gear manufactured for the game, others they use real issue gear. Right now we have the benefit of acquiring stuff directly from vets or of the items themselves being so cheap you know they're legit. As time goes on it will get a bit more murky and experience from this time period will be invaluable.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

In closing, my opinions on collecting by condition is "Judge not, lest ye be judged" and "If it floats your boat, collect it" so sayeth the Rambob.

 

Actually, that first quote was: so sayeth Jesus. But, whatever floats your boat is fine with me. :)

 

I use to heavily collect ID'd dress uniforms but have divested myself of many of them simply because of a lack of room for display. Two of those groupings which I still own include the footlocker of a WWI doughboy and a WWII artillery corporal. Both footlockers are filled with used uniforms, socks, mittens and all kinds of other used stuff. Nothing in it is mint and much of it is field gear. In this case, I think most would agree that this is preferable to NOS.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, that first quote was: so sayeth Jesus. But, whatever floats your boat is fine with me. :)

 

I use to heavily collect ID'd dress uniforms but have divested myself of many of them simply because of a lack of room for display. Two of those groupings which I still own include the footlocker of a WWI doughboy and a WWII artillery corporal. Both footlockers are filled with used uniforms, socks, mittens and all kinds of other used stuff. Nothing in it is mint and much of it is field gear. In this case, I think most would agree that this is preferable to NOS.

 

I have yet to stumble across a time capsule like that but man it would be a good day.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
PeleliuMarine1944

Wow Jake, what you wrote gave me a different perspective on collecting entirely! You are so right in every single way!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.