Jump to content

1902 US Army Enlisted Dress Blues


thecolonelscache
 Share

Recommended Posts

thecolonelscache

Okay, now for the period I really love, 1902. Here are the 1902 dress uniforms for several of the branches of the army. I still need Commissary, Ord, and Quartermaster if anyone can help. Thanks and enjoy.

 

First is a Field Artillery Sergeant. Inoder to make sergeant, one had to be a qualifed gunner, hence the cannon shell insignia.

post-3995-1220484237.jpg

 

Next is a Cavalry ferrier (sp), for the 8th Cavalry.

post-3995-1220484335.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thecolonelscache

Next is anEngineer Corporal.

post-3995-1220484586.jpg

 

And my favorite, Military School Detatchment Commissary sergeant (Spent some time in the cavalry before getting selected for the MSD corps.

post-3995-1220484681.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thecolonelscache

But wait! There is more.....My old branch, Signal Corps...Corporal.

post-3995-1220484928.jpg

 

Probably the hardest to find, Maching Gun Batallion, Cavalry. Post WW1 as indicated by the discs.

post-3995-1220485027.jpg

 

 

Now someone help me find the missing coats.....Please!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FANTASTIC! I only knew one fellow, now deceased, who had examples of all branches. Dunno what happened to them all.

 

G

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thecolonelscache
FANTASTIC! I only knew one fellow, now deceased, who had examples of all branches. Dunno what happened to them all.

 

G

 

Jeeez Gil,

Does that mean I am gonna die if I complete the collection?

I will be posting my 1902 officer dress uniforms in few days.

-Robb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CNY Militaria

On the first jacket, I always thought that coast artillery had #'s below the crossed cannons and FA had it above. Or is it vice versa?

 

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thecolonelscache
On the first jacket, I always thought that coast artillery had #'s below the crossed cannons and FA had it above. Or is it vice versa?

 

Thanks!

 

You are quite correct. The coat is Coast Artillery. My bad.....

-R

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Simply FANTASTIC!!!! thumbsup.gif I love the pre WWI uniforms and these are beauties for sure. These guys looked like SOLDIERS, and without row upon row of ribbons and other badges to adorn their chests. The most awsome collection of uniforms from this era that I've seen. SHOW US MORE!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome! I bought my first infantry M1902 uniform in July. I missed out on a really nice signal corps one a few weeks later (probably would have fit too...). I also have a New Jersey National Guard variant that I need to take some pictures of.

 

I'm quite jealous of your collection! Someday...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What a wonderfull collection! Can you tell me the "meaning" of this cords they wore with the uniform.

 

Thanks

 

Lars

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Several years ago Ed Burka aka "USMEDD" had up for auction a very nice Ordnance Sgt coat with what looked like a barber post on both sleeves with all of his service stripes. It sold for over $800. Burka always had nice turn of the century US militaria for sale at the shows and on eBay.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are quite correct. The coat is Coast Artillery. My bad.....

-R

Beginning in 1901, both Coast and Field Artillery were organized into seperate companies (Coast Artillery) and seperate batteries (Field Artillery). Together they formed the Artillery Corps and the company/battery numbers were below the crossed cannon for both. In 1907, the Field Artillery was reorganized back into regiments, so your uniform may be good for both a Coast Artillery Company or a Field Artillery Battery.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thecolonelscache
What a wonderfull collection! Can you tell me the "meaning" of this cords they wore with the uniform.

 

Thanks

 

Lars

 

The trim on the coat as well as the brest cords were of the color of the branch of service. Infantry was blue, Artillery was red, and on. There was also a cap band for the hat with colors to match. All-in-all, a very colorful outfit.

-R

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thecolonelscache
Several years ago Ed Burka aka "USMEDD" had up for auction a very nice Ordnance Sgt coat with what looked like a barber post on both sleeves with all of his service stripes. It sold for over $800. Burka always had nice turn of the century US militaria for sale at the shows and on eBay.

Yes, Ed does have nice stuff. I actually bought the Signal Corps uniform from him at a Show of Shows a couple of years ago.

-Robb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeeez Gil,

Does that mean I am gonna die if I complete the collection?

I will be posting my 1902 officer dress uniforms in few days.

-Robb

 

 

Take that as you will. I am reminded that Mark Twain wrote, "I was in the Confederate Army, but I deserted and they lost!"

 

Was it really cause and effect?

 

If I remember correctly, the last 2 Fred got were Subsistence Corps and Ordnance.

 

G

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to say, I find it highly intriguing how the service stripes worked on the M1902 uniform. Whatever time you served in a given branch, you earned the color of that branch. In theory, a person could have quite a colorful uniform!

 

Thanks again for posting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally explains the Army recruiting poster I have. It shows an Infantry First Sergeant with infantry, cavalry, and artillery service stripes! It's the rather well-known pre-WWI poster with the infantryman and the mounted bugler just sort of standing somewhere out in the Southwest. Title is big red block letters reading 'Men Wanted- for the Army.' Happy that I finally know why he has such a weird set of stripes.

 

A very impressive collection of M1902's! I'm really tempted to pick up a few myself (I've been looking at the M1902 Infantry Sergeant on your website, Colonel. :lol: ).

 

~TS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thecolonelscache
Finally explains the Army recruiting poster I have. It shows an Infantry First Sergeant with infantry, cavalry, and artillery service stripes! It's the rather well-known pre-WWI poster with the infantryman and the mounted bugler just sort of standing somewhere out in the Southwest. Title is big red block letters reading 'Men Wanted- for the Army.' Happy that I finally know why he has such a weird set of stripes.

 

A very impressive collection of M1902's! I'm really tempted to pick up a few myself (I've been looking at the M1902 Infantry Sergeant on your website, Colonel. :lol: ).

 

~TS

 

Yes, it is kind of neat how you could trace a man's service by the sleeve stripes. As for the one's on my website, the artillery and infantry coats have just sold. Sorry. Still have the cavalry set though.

-Robb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CNY Militaria

These uniforms are so neat looking! My oldest is posted here- http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind...pic=842&hl=

 

At the auction where I got this set, they also had his dress blue set to match, however it was BADLY moth eaten, dirty, and missing all insignia except buttons. I just checked and still have the pics from the auction site too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...