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Baseball in the Armed Forces


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1912 US Army Baseball Team - 4th Cavalry Regiment, L Troop - Fort Huachuca - Sierra Vista Arizona

 

 

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1910 US Army Baseball Team - 7th Cavalry Regiment, G Troop - Fort Riley - Fort Riley Kansas

 

 

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On 10/3/2016 at 9:47 PM, patches said:

After posting that foto of Japanese troops playing ball got me thinking. Does anybody know the doings in the Occupation Period in Japan Vis a Vis Baseball between U.S. Divisional Teams and Japanese Teams, even in the Korean War 50s?

 

The 1949 US Goodwill Baseball Tour of Japan was one of the first post WWII peacetime cultural exchanges between the US and Japan.  Upon the personal request of General Douglas MacArthur, the Tour was organized by Lefty O’Doul, who was already known by Japanese baseball fans through pre-war professional baseball team tours.  Lefty was manager of the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League, so he chose the Seals to play the Tour.  They played 11 games and drew more than half a million spectators to the games played at Tokyo, Nagoya and Osaka.  At the end of the tour, General MacArthur proclaimed that the Tour was “the greatest piece of diplomacy ever”. (This summary was created from a story posted by Tim Evans, Exhibitions and Education Coordinator, The Society of California Pioneers https://www.californiapioneers.org/museum/exh2/2009-2010-the-san-francisco-seals-goodwill-baseball-tour-of-japan-1949/).

 

The Japanese produced baseball menko cards of all the players on the tour.  I've posted an example ... Gene Brocker, who was a catcher on the Tour.  I’m also sharing a ticket stub for the first game of the Tour, October 15, 1949, which featured the San Francisco Seals playing the Yomiuri Giants from Korakuen Stadium in Tokyo. The Seals defeated the Giants 13-4.

 

 

 

Gene Brocker Uncataloged.jpg

Game 1 Ticket Seals vs Yomiuri Giants.jpg

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patches
4 hours ago, TLHSS said:

 

The 1949 US Goodwill Baseball Tour of Japan was one of the first post WWII peacetime cultural exchanges between the US and Japan.  Upon the personal request of General Douglas MacArthur, the Tour was organized by Lefty O’Doul, who was already known by Japanese baseball fans through pre-war professional baseball team tours.  Lefty was manager of the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League, so he chose the Seals to play the Tour.  They played 11 games and drew more than half a million spectators to the games played at Tokyo, Nagoya and Osaka.  At the end of the tour, General MacArthur proclaimed that the Tour was “the greatest piece of diplomacy ever”. (This summary was created from a story posted by Tim Evans, Exhibitions and Education Coordinator, The Society of California Pioneers https://www.californiapioneers.org/museum/exh2/2009-2010-the-san-francisco-seals-goodwill-baseball-tour-of-japan-1949/).

 

The Japanese produced baseball menko cards of all the players on the tour.  I've posted an example ... Gene Brocker, who was a catcher on the Tour.  I’m also sharing a ticket stub for the first game of the Tour, October 15, 1949, which featured the San Francisco Seals playing the Yomiuri Giants from Korakuen Stadium in Tokyo. The Seals defeated the Giants 13-4.

 

 

 

Gene Brocker Uncataloged.jpg

Game 1 Ticket Seals vs Yomiuri Giants.jpg

Great addition.

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MinorInHistory

These are kind of hard to see photos, I’ll see if I have any better ones later, but I think these are of some airmen playing Baseball in India. The photos come from a roll taken by a transport pilot during his time in the CBI during WWII.

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E06C12C8-788E-42FE-96C3-BB5C38FA30F3.jpeg

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  • 2 months later...

This is from my dad, 3ID Germany 1963-66. Not sure if it’s a baseball shirt but that’s what he told me it was. I used to play running bases in it as a kid. 
 

A side note regarding sports in units, I played rugby for Ft. Carson in the early 90s and for Ft. Bragg in the mid 90s. 

CC784A54-BAAF-4C0F-94B6-4C1F5DC23EB4.jpeg

5CD0F111-7C71-45EF-AC84-B6682E303F14.jpeg

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17 minutes ago, jmpmstr said:

This is from my dad, 3ID Germany 1963-66. Not sure if it’s a baseball shirt but that’s what he told me it was. I used to play running bases in it as a kid. 
 

A side note regarding sports in units, I played rugby for Ft. Carson in the early 90s and for Ft. Bragg in the mid 90s. 

CC784A54-BAAF-4C0F-94B6-4C1F5DC23EB4.jpeg

5CD0F111-7C71-45EF-AC84-B6682E303F14.jpeg

That is a fantastic piece to say the least. It appears to be a short-sleeve warmup sweater. I love the Rock of the Marne reference for their team name.

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This is a pretty interesting piece of memorabilia... it is a ticket to the "Navy World Series" during World War II. Sailors of the Norfolk Naval Station played and defeated the Washington Senators 4-3 in front of a crowd of 29,000 fans. A lot of the navy players were professional players who had enlisted in the Navy in support of the war effort. The most interesting aspect of the ticket to me is that the price of the ticket was the purchase of a $50 war bond! At this point in the war, that would have constituted about a month's pay for a naval recruit. The good news was that they got to keep the bond and could cash it in at some point in the future. Here is a link to an account of the game- https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2019/05/25/team-sailors-played-washington-senators-during-world-war-ii-won/

 

The game raised over $2 Million for the war effort.

 

Allan

 

Ticket.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Allan H. said:

This is a pretty interesting piece of memorabilia... it is a ticket to the "Navy World Series" during World War II. Sailors of the Norfolk Naval Station played and defeated the Washington Senators 4-3 in front of a crowd of 29,000 fans. A lot of the navy players were professional players who had enlisted in the Navy in support of the war effort. The most interesting aspect of the ticket to me is that the price of the ticket was the purchase of a $50 war bond! At this point in the war, that would have constituted about a month's pay for a naval recruit. The good news was that they got to keep the bond and could cash it in at some point in the future. Here is a link to an account of the game- https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2019/05/25/team-sailors-played-washington-senators-during-world-war-ii-won/

 

The game raised over $2 Million for the war effort.

 

Allan

 

Ticket.jpg

Do you own this stub?


Remember, the $50 war bonds were purchased at 50% of face and always, uniformed service personnel were always admitted free of charge. Depending upon the game, everyone who entered (players, umpires, team execs., concessionaires, ticket takers, grounds crew) paid to enter the ballpark.

I have several fund-raising ballgame scorecards including the first War Bond game. This was played on May 8, 1942 at Ebbets Field as the Dodgers hosted their crosstown National League rivals, the Giants. https://chevronsanddiamonds.wordpress.com/2020/12/30/diamond-score-major-league-baseballs-first-service-relief-game/ 

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40 minutes ago, 67Rally said:

Do you own this stub?


Remember, the $50 war bonds were purchased at 50% of face and always, uniformed service personnel were always admitted free of charge. Depending upon the game, everyone who entered (players, umpires, team execs., concessionaires, ticket takers, grounds crew) paid to enter the ballpark.

I have several fund-raising ballgame scorecards including the first War Bond game. This was played on May 8, 1942 at Ebbets Field as the Dodgers hosted their crosstown National League rivals, the Giants. https://chevronsanddiamonds.wordpress.com/2020/12/30/diamond-score-major-league-baseballs-first-service-relief-game/ 

Yes, it is my stub. I was aware that the price of the bond was half of face value, but recall that a navy enlistee made $22 a month in 1942, so figured $25 was about a month's pay. I wasn't aware that the servicemen were admitted for free. 

The box seats for this game cost the purchase of a $1,000 savings bond. Quite an expense for anyone in 1943.

 

Allan

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55 minutes ago, Allan H. said:

Yes, it is my stub. I was aware that the price of the bond was half of face value, but recall that a navy enlistee made $22 a month in 1942, so figured $25 was about a month's pay. I wasn't aware that the servicemen were admitted for free. 

The box seats for this game cost the purchase of a $1,000 savings bond. Quite an expense for anyone in 1943.

 

Allan


It was expensive, to be sure. When the Treasury capped the E-series bonds in the 1980s, a $50 bond was worth upwards of $1k. When we cashed in my grandparents' bonds (they had north of 50 $50 bonds and about a dozen $100 and two $500) that were all stalled for almost a decade when we found them under the attic stairs floorboard in 1994.  While it was a nice find, it wasn't the motherlode by any stretch. 

Citizens saw their role in the war effort and paid these prices. My grandfather was a train repairman (welder/riveter) for the NPRR and didn't earn much during the war so purchasing bonds was a stretch for him. My grandmother was an RN and they didn't make much money either. Just two blue-collar stiffs trying to make their way and did their patriotic duty. My grandfather was half-deaf and was missing toes from a childhood accident so he felt bad that he was rejected for service especially with his older brothers both in uniform.


The ticket stub is certainly a nice piece. Thank you for sharing!

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