Jump to content

Vietnam Reproductions: Southwest Series


gwb123
 Share

Recommended Posts

L/75th attached to 101st patches.

 

Keep in mind, this vendor made enough "variations" to make his customer think they were getting something new and different each time.

L 75 A3.JPG

L 75 A6.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CAV death card patches. I have yet to find an example where these were ever worn by a unit in theater. There are dozens of variations of these.

7 1 CAV RECON HHT A1.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another large patch, this one being a novelty patch for a short timer.

 

I am going to stop here for now, with the intention of adding more material as it comes up on the Forum.

 

Hopefully, by looking at these you can recognize the lettering, border stitching and some of the materials used in this prolific series of Vietnam era reproductions.

 

I guarantee, if you collect patches from this era, you will run into one of these eventually.

NOVELTY HOOCH GUARD T25.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

firefighter

Here is an example that continues to show the same techniques, but also the games played to heighten the sale.

 

One thing this repro artist understood was that patch collectors wanted the exotic. He tended to have a lot of patches with

attached tabs, and the more outlandish, the better.

 

Note the distinctive zig zag stitch around the border. Also the lettering for the "23" with the thin edges.

 

While the attached tab is not rendered too badly for shape, look at the unevenness of the 23rd ID portion of the patch.

 

Another offering on eBay.

 

 

It's interesting to see that a decorated Vietnam vet would add to stereotype of fellow war vets by adding a "BABY KILLER" tab. Especially since the 23rd 'Americal' was Lt. William Calley Jr's unit.

Very interesting thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

vintageproductions

Nope, hasn't been on the circuit in years as a dealer.

 

You would see his crap, all stapled to letters of authenticity, in the late 1980's - 1990's like Gil has stated. Now you just see his fake patches at all the shows.

 

This was another example that if things appear too good to be true, then they are.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

firefighter

Nope, hasn't been on the circuit in years as a dealer.

 

You would see his crap, all stapled to letters of authenticity, in the late 1980's - 1990's like Gil has stated. Now you just see his fake patches at all the shows.

 

This was another example that if things appear too good to be true, then they are.

 

What was the name he used when he would sign a letter of authenticity, or did he use different names?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

What was the name he used when he would sign a letter of authenticity, or did he use different names?

 

Sorry, but we will be keeping the name off of here for now. But no, he used his own name each and every time that I am aware of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks to everyone for their kind comments.

 

I just wanted to add that this is just the tip of the iceberg. There are dozens more designs that were made by this individual, mostly for US Army and a few for the US Navy.

 

Buyer beware!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let's not forget his items also ended up being pictured in Ian Sutherlands SF book as well as others to further muddy the waters for collectors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

firefighter

 

Sorry, but we will be keeping the name off of here for now. But no, he used his own name each and every time that I am aware of.

 

I agree that the name does not need to be published.But I was asking if he used the same name or different names when he did sign a letter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

firefighter

The vendor used his name on all of the certificates of authenticity that I have seen.

 

Thank you. I am digging through my stuff. I may have one of those.Will post if I can find it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
matthew123

Another source of fake patches has an interesting back story...

 

Mr. "D" at the military market in Saigon, sells any Vietnam era patch, at $2 each. The interesting part of the story is that he still uses the machines his uncle used back in the day when the uncle produced patches for the military.

 

I've seen them by the bagful in his small shop. I know one dealer in Australia who buys there, and sells them as a "Vietnam War Piece" instead of telling the truth, and the interesting story behind them.

 

Of course then he would be able to sell them at the price these regrettable fakes reach on ebay.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

If you ain't CAV, you ain't XXXX....

 

1st CAV motto patches have been popular with collectors going all the way back to the wartime period itself. Our vendor here did a lot to meet that demand with numerous designs ranging from the super cool to the weird.

 

There are a lot of 1st CAV motto repros on the market, so it has taken some sorting to figure out which ones can be associated with this vendor. However, the task was made easier when one of our fellow collectors found a stash of these, all dutifully stapled to a signed attestation of authenticity signed by the repro artist himself!

 

Here is one of my all time favorites... a Medevac crew patch. The lettering, off center aspects, and the use of applicque all are indicative of this vendor.

f0361d20fa6ccd82d87ae7d3dfe33eee.jpg

 

Mine looks a little different than the one shown. I think its a reproduction but not sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...