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USAF SAC Missile Badge Collection/Display


coli8344
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This is my USAF Missile badge collection. I've included my original Basic Missile and Senior Missile mini, full size and bullion badges in the collection. On the top row with the exception of the mini Basic Missile badge on the top left and the full size "No Shine" Basic Missile next to it the others in the top row are all sterling and though the badges look alike they are made by different manufacturers: Simon, Krew, N.S. Meyers, Vanguard, and General Products Company. There is a Master Missile Badge which has a wreath with a star in the center at the top of the badge but I focus this collection on the two levels I earned , basic and senior. The collection is stored in an aluminum display case with an acrylic clear cover.

 

 

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In this picture the basic metal missile badge on the far left and the senior metal missile badge are lapel/tie pins both about 1.25" tall. The bullion badges are the most unique in my opinion because no two look exactly alike. From what I've seen, even those that look alike seem to have some small difference, imperfection that makes it different at least in my opinion.

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That is an really nice collection of Missile badges. I thought I was the only one that liked these things. I have a few of the Master badges also in honor of my dad how was in TMS in Germany and Okinawa. Keep up the good work and thanks for your service.

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These are all mini badges. All are silver toned with the exception of the basic pin on the far left which is gold toned-some are pin backs and some have clutches. They average about 3/4" tall for the basic badges and about 1"tall for the senior badges. After 30 years I'm still learning about how and when all these badges were made. Thank you for looking.

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Texas36th, thank you, it helps me keep track of what hallmarks folks have out there. Longbranch, they are truly under-appreciated. I've been told it's because information about TAC and SAC missions especially mission info dealing with missiles was rarely disseminated or at the time considered classified, some collectors veered away from this area, at least from what I have experienced not many collectors showed an interest unless they had been directly involved with these units or knew someone that had been. With the Cold War having played such a big part of our history I'm hoping more folks become interested.

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Longbranch, they are truly under-appreciated. I've been told it's because information about TAC and SAC missions especially mission info dealing with missiles was rarely disseminated or at the time considered classified, some collectors veered away from this area, at least from what I have experienced not many collectors showed an interest unless they had been directly involved with these units or knew someone that had been. With the Cold War having played such a big part of our history I'm hoping more folks become interested.

 

Definitely. The SAC did a great job of deterring any kind of aggressive action, and in effect, did the greatest thing you could ever want from a military force: effectively PREVENT another world war. Gotta say, that's something to be proud of, and hopefully more people take notice/become interested.

 

A while back at a garage sale I picked up a really nice, complete USAF dress uniform (jacket, pants, shirt, tie, cap, ribbons, badges, etc.) directly from a vet that served in a nuclear missile installation in the early 60s. I sold it off several years back, and sometimes think it would be cool if I still had it. You really don't find many complete uniform groupings from these guys!

 

Information about the ICBM and nuclear-capable missile systems of the 50s/60s is definitely hard to find. I recently came across several items that are related to 1950s/60s guided missile systems, and basically found the end of the internet trying to get information about them (and came up empty).

 

You've got a great collection. Again, thanks for showing it!

 

EDIT: Forgot to ask... have you been to the Strategic Air & Space Museum in Ashland, NE? A place like that could get just about anyone interested in 1950s/60s Air Force militaria.

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If you can find a SAC missile crew uniform, crew blues, I'd hold on to it. They made us turn these in when we left the crew side of operations. I still have my SAC crew overalls and my flight gave me a Missile Combat Crew Commander helmet on my last alert.

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Here's a small travel collection I put together awhile back which I use for Cold War presentations. It's a cloth/twill missile uniform collection for basic and senior missile badge examples. It also includes a Japanese made Basic Missile badge.

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Close up of center, the missile badge was authorized on May 23, 1958 coming out in the embroidered form first and soon after came out in metal form. The metal form was worn on most uniforms at first (even the early white missile crew uniforms). The missile badge was first called the "Guided Missile Insignia".

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These are very nice looking a very specific and focused collection

 

I have the Pershing Missile badge (aka the Pershing Pickle) for the Army's version of the tactical ballistic missile that was one of a few in their inventory..

 

Leigh

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Great collection you have! I'm a big fan of specialized & complete collections of specific insignia such as yours. Well done!

I had these for years and never paid much attention to them, I finally sold them on eBay. I don't have a picture of the backs but I seem to recall the missiles were separate pieces and were riveted on. I also don't remember the maker markings, but they were sterling.

 

 

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