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Jeff TX

D. Nippes marked Percussion Musket 1840

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Folks,

I am sharing with you a riffle I picked up in Ohio about four years ago.

 

This 69 caliber smooth bore was produced or modified by Daniel Nippes. The lock plate is marked D. Nippes below the hammer :

Mill

Creek

PA

1842

 

The barrel tang is stamped "1841" and the barrel top is marked:

US

JH

P- inside a circle

 

The stock has two burned in initials on the left side "EB and 'WAT". If my memory is correct this is a Captain William Anderson Thornton who was assigned to inspect Nippes contract muskets.

 

There is also the letter "P" stamped on the trigger guard below the rear screw and the metal butt plate is stamped "US"

 

Does anyone know what "EB" stands for?

 

Regards to all,

Jeff

 

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Nice musket! Unusual lock plate & hammer....

inspector is : Elizur Bates Waters

there is a list of US martial arms inspectors on line...

David



Pvt. James H. Honey 1st Md. Eastern shore Vol. Inf. Co. D (union) Gettysburg
Pvt. George Eddie Lear 26th Inf. Co.H 1st Div .(WW1) P.H. WIA Cpl. Richard Elsea 268th C.A. Bn. Battery A. WW2 SSgt. Grant Elsea 314th Inf. Hq.Co. I.R.79thDiv. WW2
Cpl. Harry Lawrence Butler Jr 23rd Regt. WIA Korea Lt. George Olin Tilghman 111th MG. 29th Div. WW1 DIS France 1919
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Very nice weapon :) I don't think I've ever seen a conversion like that before. Any idea who/where did the conversion?

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Thanks David!

 

Dunmore1774- the conversion was done by Daniel Nippes of Mill Creek Pa in 1841 for a US Army conversion flintlock to percussion contract.

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Folks,

I am sharing with you a riffle I picked up in Ohio about four years ago.

 

This 69 caliber smooth bore was produced or modified by Daniel Nippes. The lock plate is marked D. Nippes below the hammer :

Mill

Creek

PA

1842

 

The barrel tang is stamped "1841" and the barrel top is marked:

US

JH

P- inside a circle

 

The stock has two burned in initials on the left side "EB and 'WAT". If my memory is correct this is a Captain William Anderson Thornton who was assigned to inspect Nippes contract muskets.

 

There is also the letter "P" stamped on the trigger guard below the rear screw and the metal butt plate is stamped "US"

 

Does anyone know what "EB" stands for?

 

Regards to all,

Jeff

 

 

Here is a shot of my Nippes that never made it back to be converted to percussion.

 

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Thanks hawk3370- very interesting to see what was done to repurpose the same lock for percussion use!

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The "EB" is probably Elizur Bates. I think the "Waters" name attached to him in a response above is a typo from his inspector's initials appearing on guns made by Waters.

The musket was both made and altered by Nippes. He had two contracts in the late 1840s to alter model 1840 muskets to percussion and mount a Maynard tape priming system that screwed onto the lockplate. It has been removed from this musket but the peculiarly shaped hammer it used is still there.

Nippes still had some 300 muskets he had not finished from a contract for 1840 pattern muskets when he got the contract to do the alterations, so he converted them and the government shipped back another 700 muskets of his make to fulfill the contract. He also received a second contract for a thousand more. Apparently not all the guns sent back to him were his. The conversion turns up on other maker's guns as well. But, that explains why he is working on guns he made and shipped out several years earlier.

I am cribbing most of this from George Moller's "American Military Shoulder Arms."

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Steve- thank you very much for the great summary of this Nippes firearm. In your opinion does the low volume produced/modified make this arm more rare and thus increase the value. I would like to leave my family heirs as much information as possible should The Lord call me home.

Kind Regards,

Jeff

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Flayderman (9th ed.) puts these Nippes Maynard conversions at $2,000 in good condition and $3,750 in fine condition. The problem is that this one lacks the Maynard tape priming unit, which is what makes them valuable. He puts a Nippes 1840 flintlock that has simply been converted to percussion (not with the Maynard system) at $575 in good and $800 in fine. I would think the musket is much closer to these last numbers. A collector will find it interesting, but will have little hope of ever finding the unit to mount on the gun.

Flayderman's 9th edition is somewhat old, of course, but I think it's probably pretty accurate in today's market. (Others may differ on that.)

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Steve- I really appreciate your feedback that I have archived for my son's reference.

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