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Can anyone ID this odd parachute?


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I picked up this chute last week and I'm stumped on the model. aside from the sizing info on the pad there are no other markings except "USAF 51" and "81772" on the pack.

 

Here is what confuses me is that the canopy is red cotton with white reinforcement webbing. At first I thought someone just stuffed a load of red cloth in the pack, but upon investigating further everything is correct. The risers are integral to the harness and suspension lines lead to the canopy. Everything looks to me correct to me.

 

I know a bit about chutes having been in the military and from my own personal research. But this one has me stumped.

 

Can anyone help with a model, date, any other info?

 

Thanks

 

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I believe it is a British harness.

Interested in items related to:

-Amarillo A.A.F. / Amarillo Air Force Base

-Military instillations located in the Texas Panhandle, South Plains, and West Texas.

-"F" Company, 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division (Texas National Guard)

-413th Civil Affairs Battalion (USAR)

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In Memoriam:

CSM Juan H. Hernandez - U.S. Army WWII, Korea, Vietnam

RM1c William C. Denney - U.S.S. McDermut (DD-677) Korea

 

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This has all the makings of a civilian rig from the early 1960's. At that time, most sport jumpers used chutes made from surplus components. The container is an AF back rig, with an airborne late model circa 1953 T-7 harness. My guess is the red cotton you are seeing is from a deployment sleeve. These were characteristic of the early sport rigs and made the opening shock tolerable. D-bags became common in later years.

www.theriggerdepot.com - Replica WWII Parachute Gear

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This has all the makings of a civilian rig from the early 1960's. At that time, most sport jumpers used chutes made from surplus components. The container is an AF back rig, with an airborne late model circa 1953 T-7 harness. My guess is the red cotton you are seeing is from a deployment sleeve. These were characteristic of the early sport rigs and made the opening shock tolerable. D-bags became common in later years.

 

Ahhhhhh yes, that's it, a T-7 harness. The chute inside is actually not a deployment bag. I did a little more peeking inside last night and it looks to be a WWII era red cotton canopy like the kind use for aerial delivery containers. So far we have a WWII chute (maybe) connected to a T-7 harness. Any ideas on the pack?

 

I picked it $125 only because I don't have a cute with a bang box, I had no idea it was a mix of parts.

 

Thanks again.

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I realize it certainly isn't a deployment bag, but are you sure it isn't a deployment sleeve? I have a hard time believing a person would be so incredibly foolish to try jumping a cargo chute, as they are constructed quite differently.

Most sleeves are made from a colorful cotton material like aerial delivery canopies, with cotton reinforcement tapes. Sleeves are about 13 feet long, so when folded they look a lot like a canopy.

www.theriggerdepot.com - Replica WWII Parachute Gear

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  • 4 weeks later...

I opened the chute and sure enough it is a red deployment sleeve. The chute is a standard white/orange/OD military canopy on which someone sewed the initials "JD" on the canopy sections. Definitely a military surplus turned civilian chute. It's worth nothing to me in the condition it's in now, but the harness and canopy would make the base for a great restoration project if I can find a good pack assembly.

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