Jump to content

What is the hardest part of modeling for you?


Recommended Posts

Okay gang, I have agreed to do a blow by blow account of a modeling project for the model forum here... I have a question that I would like to see tossed about here...

 

Q: What is the hardest part of doing a model project?

 

Some of the things to consider are:

 

1. Subject matter. You might think this wouldnt be hard considering the subject to be posted here HAS to be a US subject. Hint: Think of how many different vehicles, aircraft, and figures there are to choose from...

 

2. Time constraints. How much time do you have to spend on your project?

 

3. Price. I know for me, cost is always a factor... you can go the Tamiya M4A3E2 Jumbo for about $25 or you can go the hard route and do the Tam M4A3 with the Azimut conversion kit... which would entail a $30 Tamiya kit as a base, then $70 for the conversion kit. (been there... done that... well, am DOING it, I'm not done yet!)

 

4. Detail. How much detail do you want to add into the project. See #3 above. The more Detail you add, the more the cost will rise.

 

For example, I built an M4 Early production Sherman for an AMPS contest in Colorado back in 2002. I thought one month would be plenty of time to get it done. I already had the kit in hand ($35), but to win at AMPS it really has to stand out. So I went for the Verlinden interior kit. ($30) Then, after painting and installing the interior, I looked at the wide open engine compartment, and got the engine too ($40). I was putting the finishing touches on the model on the morning of the contest. It DID however, take a silver. w00t.gif

 

5. Level of experience. This should be self explanatory. I consider myself to be a novice, but IPMS and AMPS both consider me to be advanced. What techniques do you use? Do you hand paint? Airbrush? What is your favorite technique?

 

6. Reference material. How big is your reference library? Do you have the proper references for the subject matter?

 

Okay, that should be enough to get a good free flowing conversation going here. Lets hear your best, and the worst... its a learning experience. I've been building models since I was 8. I'll be 48 this year and I never think I know it all. I always try to learn new stuff to try. As soon as I get some scans going, I'll start posting my work too.

 

Wayne

Freedom isnt free... it must be paid for. Too often it is paid for by the blood of patriots. For those who have paid their share, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess, I'll start off. I began when I was around 10. Not to date myself, but the biggest military modeling companies back the was Monogram and Revel. Tamiya I don't think had even entered the US market yet. For Civilian models ie: cars it was the former MPC company. Anyways, had about a 6 year break during my first part of Army Career. Now, I'm back and still going strong at 51. here's a link to my model pages on my website http://www.gotrain.org/~emgeer/model-intro.htm. All the models shown have been built it the past 5 years.

 

HARDEST PART

 

For me it varies. At times its the subject matter, or cost of the project (models, accessories, etc). at other times its the extent of detail i plan on putting into the model. Time would and could play a major role in my building a model. A lot of time, I have a no later then date and that puts restrictions on how much i put into the model.

 

Here's an example: To build the M966 TOW 2 carrier I posted here here's some of the details

 

Initial cost for the project: $57.00

 

The break is as follows: Academy, M966, TOW 2 Missile Carrier, (Kit #CA149) $31.00; DML U.S. Marine Tank-Killers; for the TOW 2 (kit #3012) $9.99; Eduard Photo-etch, M1036 HMMV with Tow Launcher (Kit # 35 258) $4.98 (discontinued); Aber Photo-etch, TOW and Dragon Detail Kit (PAB35009) $10.95. This doesn't include the plaque, the stain, the polyurethene, or the railroad scenic static grass used. Nor does it take into account the time I spent creating the scratch built items used.

 

The total time

start to finish was about 3 months.

An I would put the actual work time to around 200 hours as a min.

 

Level

 

I would put myself between intermediate and advance.

 

Techniques

 

Now a days I use a single action Pasche airbrush for most of my work. For fine detail work, weathering, I still prefer to use brushes. for example for vehicles I heavily depend on my airbrush for the painting of it and basic weathering. now, when it comes to painting figures, paintbrush without a doubt.

 

I still am learning. The M966 model I built about 5 yrs ago, was the first multi-media build i did.

 

 

reference material

 

I don't have a lot of reference material. I still have a few military FM, TMs, PMs from my 20 yrs in the army. I also use my many photos I've taken over those years. I depend on my personal knowledge, etc. An last but not least, I use the internet.

American by birth. Light Fighter by Choice!!!!

7th Infantry Division (Light) 82-93

4/9 IR, 3/17 IR, S3 3 Bde

Link to post
Share on other sites

TM's are the best reference material! When I was assigned to Fort Huachuca from 94 to 96, I remember getting the Tamiya M1A1 for christmas. I was floundering around trying to find pictures of the interior because I wanted to do a Turret interior. The summer of that year, the reserve armor unit on post de-activated and one of my friends there asked me if I would like a complete set of manuals for the M1A1... Duh...

 

I have TM's for the M113, the M1A1, the M2, M2A1, and M2A2, the M48 tank, the M998 series and the M1114. I'm sure there are more I just have to catalog them.

 

One of the hardest things for me is to pick ONE picture in my references and say, THAT IS WHAT I AM GONIG TO BUILD.

 

Wayne

Freedom isnt free... it must be paid for. Too often it is paid for by the blood of patriots. For those who have paid their share, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good questions! I started building when I was 8 but stopped for the usual reasons by the time I hit college. I've only built a couple models since then (it's been awhile since I last sniffed any glue :blink: ). But to answer some of your questions, here goes (in no particular order);

 

Price isn't too big a factor, although I won't buy every PE set available for a specific kit. Time is the biggest obstacle for me. I really need to try hard to find time AND carve out a space somewhere dedicated to modeling.

 

Detail is important but I am by no means a "rivet counter" stickler for obsessive detail. I build for pleasure and am happy to turn out a reasonable scale facsimile of the real item. Good painting skills are a must and I need to get better with the airbrush.

 

My skill level sure ain't anywhere near yours Wayne! I'm probably an intermediate level at best. I definitely need to get building again and get practicing techniques again to improve my models.

 

The internet has been a real goldmine for great reference sources with all the modeling forums out there plus photos of actual vehicles. I'll buy books for references also for specific subjects.

 

My main interest has always been armor, specifically US and Soviet.

to all who have served!

 

donation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2019.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pick up a copy of FineScale Modeler magazine. That one mag is a wealth of information on how to build, how to airbrush, pretty much anything how to... Pick up one or two issues... if it helps, then I would say it is well worth the cost of subscription for you.

 

I started out modeling with the old Tamiya M41 Walker Bulldog and the M42 Duster when they still motorized them. I used to love to run those things all over the back yard. Everntually the motors gave out, they got shoved aside for other projects, and 40 years later, here I am...

 

My interests vary, from armor to aircraft to figures, but I really love detailing WW II and modern US Armor.

 

Wayne

Freedom isnt free... it must be paid for. Too often it is paid for by the blood of patriots. For those who have paid their share, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree FineScale Modeler is great. I've been a devote reader now for around 7 yrs plus. I found another good source for info, techniques, help, etc. It's a modeler's website called Armorama. The users on this website range from novice to near masters. No question goes unanswered and advice and comments on your work can always be found. The link for this website site is: http://armorama.com/index.php.

 

I guess the TMs that I value the most would be the ones for the US Army camouflage patterns. I have found over the years, the drawing showing the camouflage pattern be it the new 3 Color or the old 4 color are usually wrong. So, I revere to them for the correct pattern.

American by birth. Light Fighter by Choice!!!!

7th Infantry Division (Light) 82-93

4/9 IR, 3/17 IR, S3 3 Bde

Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree FineScale Modeler is great. I've been a devote reader now for around 7 yrs plus. I found another good source for info, techniques, help, etc. It's a modeler's website called Armorama. The users on this website range from novice to near masters. No question goes unanswered and advice and comments on your work can always be found. The link for this website site is: http://armorama.com/index.php.

 

I guess the TMs that I value the most would be the ones for the US Army camouflage patterns. I have found over the years, the drawing showing the camouflage pattern be it the new 3 Color or the old 4 color are usually wrong. So, I revere to them for the correct pattern.

 

I live not too far from the contractor that builds the M1114 and MRAPs. I find it interesting that vehicles these days are coming off the assembly lines in two colors. Sand, or Forest Green. The MRAPs I've seen being trucked out are in FS 30277 sand, and look at the Strykers... solid FS 34092 forest green. I will say though, I've been around long enough to see camouflage change quite a bit in the past 30 years. I remember the old 45-45-5-5 four color scheme. 45% FS 34079 Green, 45% red-brown, 5% black and 5% sand. The NATO 3-color is a little more muddled, seemingly painted more by pattern than a percentage of specific color coverage. The colors are FS 34092 green, FS 30051 brown and FS 37078 Black. Back in the early 90s nearly all the stateside vehicles were painted with this scheme. In my unit we had bradleys and M113s and the pattern was similar on both vheicles.

 

The new sand colors are a fiddly bunch too. Some goes on light and turns darker as it ages and weathers, others get lighter as they age, and let's not even talk about the Pinks... When I was in Baghdad in 03, I saw a Bradley that was literally pink. Of course the crew made the best of it, naming their vehicle "The Pink Panther" but well, pink armor and combat dont mix... I kept expecting Cary Grant and Tony Curtis to pop up somewhere and see the Bradley growl, backfire and belch out a thick cloud of black smoke. Shades of Operation Petticoat.

 

Wayne

Freedom isnt free... it must be paid for. Too often it is paid for by the blood of patriots. For those who have paid their share, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the hardest part of modeling for me would be all the clothing changes.

 

Oh sorry wrong modeling. w00t.gif

 

With a title like that I couldn't resist.

Written contributor to French Militaria Magazine, UK World War II Re-enactors Magazine &The Karkee Web Research Team.

Remembering the service of:
9095 Pte Alfred Fredrick NEWLAND, 7th Field Ambulance, 2 Division, AIF. WIA 16/11/16 France.
436 Private Albert McCANN, B Company 8th Battalion AIF. Enlisted 26/8/14. Killed in Action 17/6/15 Gallipoli.
VX24056 Gunner George Edward McCANN, 2/3 Composite Anti Aircraft Regiment. Enlisted 7/6/40. Discharged 3/8/44. Served in Australia and New Guinea.



donation2016.gif

donation2013.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2008.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

*busts out laughing* I was wondering when someone would get around to that...

 

Still, thanks for posting, I got a good laugh out of it!

 

Wayne

Freedom isnt free... it must be paid for. Too often it is paid for by the blood of patriots. For those who have paid their share, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

For me, my goal was to build a fairly decent model for under $30 and have fun doing it. I didn't get bent out of shape over camo patterns so long as the colors and prints were "close enough". I didn't build a lot of armor - my passion is airplanes so that's what I focused on, and for under $20 I could buy cheap kits and make them better (always a challenge there). Some shaving, some filing, a little Dremel work, some extra sprue and brass wire, and a Revell P-51B Mustang turned out looking pretty good.

 

Then I got tired of building static, lifeless models and tried my hand at dioramas. I decided 1/72 was about as small a scale as I could go and still show good amount of detail in the smallest amount of space on my shelf (always a limiting factor). Pretty soon an airfield full of Bf-109s, complete with factory, railroad depot, train, and miscellaneous people occupied an entire shelf on my bookcase. Then, as an experiment, I built a couple dioramas inside those shoebox-sized model car display cases that turned out well, which opened up more space for models on my shelf because now I could stack'em up! w00t.gif

 

Then a couple years ago, I crossed over... from building WW2 to living WW2. I became a history reenactor.

 

If you think $50 for a model is expensive, you don't wanna know how much a pair of paratrooper pants costs, much less the jacket, a full set of web gear, boots, helmet, and rifle. But, boy, is it fun! Camping under vintage shelters, marching in parades, interacting with vets and the general public... I wouldn't trade that for any model (not even the "Visible P-51D Mustang" model I ogled in the hobby shop for months before someone else bought it) .

 

Now I have boxes of partially-built models that "someday I'll finish" that are sitting in the garage getting pushed farther back into the corners as Tupperware crates of uniforms, sleeping bags, tents, canteens, and webgear are stacked higher and higher in front.

 

So I'd say, right now, my biggest problem is looking at the stacks of model boxes and thinking "some day I'll finish those".

Link to post
Share on other sites
For me, my goal was to build a fairly decent model for under $30 and have fun doing it. I didn't get bent out of shape over camo patterns so long as the colors and prints were "close enough". I didn't build a lot of armor - my passion is airplanes so that's what I focused on, and for under $20 I could buy cheap kits and make them better (always a challenge there). Some shaving, some filing, a little Dremel work, some extra sprue and brass wire, and a Revell P-51B Mustang turned out looking pretty good.

 

Then I got tired of building static, lifeless models and tried my hand at dioramas. I decided 1/72 was about as small a scale as I could go and still show good amount of detail in the smallest amount of space on my shelf (always a limiting factor). Pretty soon an airfield full of Bf-109s, complete with factory, railroad depot, train, and miscellaneous people occupied an entire shelf on my bookcase. Then, as an experiment, I built a couple dioramas inside those shoebox-sized model car display cases that turned out well, which opened up more space for models on my shelf because now I could stack'em up! w00t.gif

 

Then a couple years ago, I crossed over... from building WW2 to living WW2. I became a history reenactor.

 

If you think $50 for a model is expensive, you don't wanna know how much a pair of paratrooper pants costs, much less the jacket, a full set of web gear, boots, helmet, and rifle. But, boy, is it fun! Camping under vintage shelters, marching in parades, interacting with vets and the general public... I wouldn't trade that for any model (not even the "Visible P-51D Mustang" model I ogled in the hobby shop for months before someone else bought it) .

 

Now I have boxes of partially-built models that "someday I'll finish" that are sitting in the garage getting pushed farther back into the corners as Tupperware crates of uniforms, sleeping bags, tents, canteens, and webgear are stacked higher and higher in front.

 

So I'd say, right now, my biggest problem is looking at the stacks of model boxes and thinking "some day I'll finish those".

 

Truer words have never been spoken... and yes, I would believe how much all the real stuff costs because I collect too. After 28 years in the military, I'm going to try to get in with a reenactment group... so naturally I am trying to get up an impression or two. I have a whole closet full of those models I'll get to one of these days, in addition to the two cages of models I had to leave in colorado because someone lost the keys to the storage area and the powers that be refused to have the doors re-locked so that I could get my stuff out. The Old unit failed to forward my stuff to me as well, so I have over $700 worth of models and quite a bit of gear that went bye bye there...

 

Right now, the hardest thing for me is getting the time and gumption to work on this workbench project long enough to get it done. I enjoy the modeling, its just that trying to paint hundreds of tiny squares one at a time on a figure about the size of the palm of your hand leads to massive headaches... LOL I find myself working on it in twenty minute spurts then its on to something else to give my eyes a rest. I hope to get this next post in pretty soon.

 

Wayne

Freedom isnt free... it must be paid for. Too often it is paid for by the blood of patriots. For those who have paid their share, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things that are the hardest:

 

Time and space

 

I love ship models especially the 1/350 scale I have at least five waiting on the shelf to build. I don't have an area in the house which I can devote space to building and for displaying. This fall once all the outdoor projects are done the plan is to build a "clean" work area in the garage closed off from the rest of it. Once that is done I can work in a heated hobby shop during the winter. If I planned it right I'll have some shelf space for displaying them.

Human beings make life so interesting. Do you know, that in a universe so full of wonders, they have managed to invent boredom?--Death, Hogfather/Terry Pratchett

 

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well the hardest part of modeling for me would be all the clothing changes.

 

Oh sorry wrong modeling. w00t.gif

 

With a title like that I couldn't resist.

 

 

X,

 

dont forget the fishnets!!!

 

RON

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





Link to post
Share on other sites
X,

 

dont forget the fishnets!!!

 

RON

 

Lol.

 

 

But in all seriousness.

 

I admire you guys for your patience and skill.

I don't have either. :rolleyes:

Written contributor to French Militaria Magazine, UK World War II Re-enactors Magazine &The Karkee Web Research Team.

Remembering the service of:
9095 Pte Alfred Fredrick NEWLAND, 7th Field Ambulance, 2 Division, AIF. WIA 16/11/16 France.
436 Private Albert McCANN, B Company 8th Battalion AIF. Enlisted 26/8/14. Killed in Action 17/6/15 Gallipoli.
VX24056 Gunner George Edward McCANN, 2/3 Composite Anti Aircraft Regiment. Enlisted 7/6/40. Discharged 3/8/44. Served in Australia and New Guinea.



donation2016.gif

donation2013.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2008.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I spend a lot of time creating the mechanical devices (guns, guitars etc) for the sculptures, more so sometimes than the time spent on the likeness or the construction of the figure. I enjoy all the work, but making a Thompson SMG takes time. I miss-calculated the ratio for the first Thompson I made for the Sarge figure, it was an inch off. Fortunately, I was able to add the inch to the sculpt without starting over.

 

No matter I really enjoy working in this genre and all the work is well worth it in the end.

 

On a side note:

I was lucky enough to work on the Korean War Veterans Memorial in DC. I was one of four artisans who enlarged the sculptor's (Frank Gaylord) figures from 2.5 feet to 7.5 ft. We used a manual 3-d pantograph to do this, welded a pipe armature, covered it with foam, used wire lathe for the ponchos and added clay. Once the our work was done the sculptor came in and refined and sculpted more detail. It was great and a kick working with Frank Gaylord, he was also a survivor of the Battle of the Bulge.

 

Here is a link about the machine and the new digital technology: http://www.keropiansculpture.com/enlgmachine.html

 

Mike K

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree with The Meatcan, the hardest thing for me is to find the time to sit at the work bench. I had visions of days of model building leasure time after I retired from the Army. I was sure that after 26+ years of the Big Green Machine, during much of which I was able to build models pretty steadily (well, off and on when I was at home), that after I retired I would just be able to sit back and build all of those kits in my "to-do" pile.

 

But now I work as a PMC for one of the Northern Virginia "Beltway Bandits," and it seems that I don't have the time of day anymore, much less time to build models. My OPTEMP is worse now than it ever was, and my "honey do" list seems to never get anything worked off.

 

So, after trying to find time, my next hardest thing is keeping my modeling skills (as limited as they are) at an acceptable level. I find that I have to go back and re-learn and practice techniques that I once was pretty good at (figure painting, for example, comes to mind since that's what's sitting unfinished on my work bench right now).

 

Where I once finished 2 or 3 projects a year, I now consider myself lucky to finish one.

 

An interesting topic, Wayne.

 

Mike

"Hope is not a course of action." Sean P. Kelly, SSG, 1st US Ranger Battalion

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

My biggest problem is display space. I have a workspace in my garage, but cars and tools take up a lot of that. Plus the 1/1 scale (real) project truck and associated parts. Went to wally world and bought a couple CD racks which work really good for a collection display. But, with all the models stored in boxes and the kits yet to be built, I need about 5 more of those.

 

I prefer 1/35 scale but I am not a contest modeler. Most of mine are "5 footers" or "10 footers" They look great from 5 or 10 feet away.

 

References? I have articles from newspapers and magazines from the middle sixties because they showed real vehicles in real situations that would make great dioramas some day. A couple thousand personal pictures, a 15 volume scrapbook in 3 ring binders, plus another 120 reference books for if I'm ever tempted to spend the time on a contest winner.

 

Don't feel the desire to build more kits just to store them in boxes. Hope to move the 1/1 scale project to another building so the 4x8 museum diorama (see post about "civilian figures") can have space. Maybe then the CD racks I have will hold the leftovers.

Brian

 

Member, Great Lakes Chapter MVPA and MVPA

Member, Michigan Museum of Military Transport Foundation

SSG, Michigan Army National Guard, Retired

M37 4 door project truck

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things really hold me back: Patience and painting. It's why I stick with card modeling ships. I don't have to paint and while it can test my patience, I can continue working the model without worrying about glue drying or having to paint the model. So if I have a real modeling streak going, I can attack it! You have to have decent dexterity in your fingers to handle the small parts, though....

 

-Ski

post-3043-1226078525.jpg

In Memory Of......
Pte Harold Griffiths, 1805, 1/6th Manchester Regt, KIA June 4th, 1915 in Gallipoli
Cpl Isaac Judges, 40494, 6th East Yorkshire Regt, KIA October 3rd, 1917 in Ypres
May they rest in peace.....

MSgt - USAF Retired

donation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I model in 1/6 scale and there is very little in the way of kits or ready built crew-served weapons or vehicles. Therefore I have to build my own or spend several hundred or even thousands of $$$ to buy.

 

You'd think in this scale it would be easier to build something because of it's size, but IMO it's harder since parts have to be made or bought at much higher prices than say 1/35 scale stuff.

 

Reference material is another part that is difficult for me. Even though I have books and can search the internet, seeing the real deal up close sure makes a difference when having to make something from scratch. Finding an item close to home that I can go look at is difficult or impossible. Sometimes I'll buy a 1/35 model to use as a reference, but if it's poorly made, then how do I even know what I'm looking at? A blob of plastic in 1/35 is just a bigger blob of plastic in 1/6, unless the detail is there.

 

In 1/6 scale everything takes more. Paint, glue, space, and weight come into play.

 

Not too long ago I built a Fw 190 cockpit, don't have the space to build the entire fuselage. My next effort will be to build the cockpit/crew nacelle for a Fw 189. Just this part will be approximately 40" long!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Hey all,

 

I'm fairly new here, but a frequent contributor on ARC and FSM. Hardest part for me is to actually paint the damn thing. I can scratchbuild all day, kitbash to my hearts content and detail an airplane or helicopter out the ying yang.

 

The second that primer coat dries, I'm off to another project!

 

I literally have to force myself to finish a model these days. I don't know if it is fear of messing up the finish or just not wanting to deal with masking, changing colors, etc, but I currently have about 35 kits in various stages of construction. I finished 5 models last year. Not a very good completion percentage!

 

Still, I love the hobby. Since getting out of reenacting, into the Army Guard and starting my job 2 years ago, I've steadily built up my stash. Now to actually finish something!

 

Jon

In memory of 1LT Julius C. Goldman, XO of F/330th, 83rd Infantry Division 1944-45.

 

Looking for P-47 and Tactical Reconnaissance Unit photographs and any items associated with WWII Jewish fighter pilots.

 

donation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been a "professional" modeler for a few years now. I started out sculpting 1/35th scale figures for Warriors back in 03 or 04, and have since sculpted for several companies world wide in various scales and subjects. For me there are a few hard things about the process. Finding the right thing to sculpt is sometimes really hard, and other times really easy. Another thing is to stay motivated with a project. The problem with sculpting and painting figures is that you have to feel like doing it, if you dont feel like it, it shows in the end results. When sculpting for a client I try to keep moving once I start on a project so I wont get burned out on it. Once the burn out sets in its hard to fight out of it, which is unacceptable when doing contract work. Fortunately I am fairly quick and can sculpt a 35th scale figure in a few days. Its the larger scales that are more time consuming.

 

As far as whats the hardest parts for me technically (not mentally) is probably sculpting noses and mechanical things such as weapons. As far as painting goes, I always try to evolve and become a better artist. I have a lot of problems painting convincing leather items. I'm getting there but its far from where I'd like to be!

"If circumstances hold you back, always seek other ways to achieve your goals"

 

donation2011.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to love building 1/35 scale german armor and 1/48 scale US WWII aircraft when i was a kid,my ceiling was full of airplanes hanging from fishing line!I decided to start building armor kits a few years ago when i have free time (its hard with a job and kids)I found painting camo patterns alot more easy as a adult because i can affoard better supplies (airbrush vs brush painting when i was a kid)better paints,brushes etc,i still cant get the hang of painting 1/35 scale figures faces.I can get uniforms ,equipment but ive ruined plenty of good looking figures with crapy face painting. thumbdown.gif

my avatar photo is my great grandfather Raymond Saunders, field remount squadrom 301,AEF

Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, it's finding the time or energy to start (let alone finish) anything. I recently started a Monogram M4A1 kit that I'd been saving for over 25 years. My son was born 2 1/2 years ago & I was unemployed at the time, so I worked on it while he slept (which was often). As he stayed awake more during the day, I had less time to devote to the project. I'm working again & now I barely have time to do anything. I'm usually in bed by 9 or 10 pm so I can awake by 5 am for work. Home by 5 pm, start dinner before the wife gets home, play with the son & his Thomas the Tank Engine stuff, eat dinner, watch some tv, play with computer, back to bed. I'm exhausted.

 

 

The second hardest part of modeling for me is which version, model/series of vehicle to represent. I consider myself an advanced modeler & have won several local contests, but haven't entered anything lately. I once took first place in "curbside" category for model cars, using a Snap-tite kit. It was a 1950 Chevy pick-up truck with a "junk" load of vintage car parts (left-over model car parts) & an old wringer-type washing machine (refrigerator magnet). The radio antenna was a piece of thin wire shaped to look like a coat hanger, a crack & a couple bullet holes in the windshield, "worn" seat cushions, rust & weathering, etc. A passing kid said to his dad, "Look dad, it's the one from the magazine". I was flattered. I had not read a magazine prior to building it, so not sure which mag he was referring to. All the ideas were mine alone.

 

Another first place winner was a compilation of two kits. One was a 1977 Chevy wrecker & the other was a 1964 Chevy pick-up. The finished product was a 1964 Chevy 1-ton wrecker with a few modern touches, such as a 454 engine with fuel injection & Accel Supercoil, dual batteries, full engine wiring & hoses, tools on the wrecker bed deck, as well as a scratch-built air compressor & fuel cell.

 

Alot of the 1/48th scale aircraft I built had lots of detail, too. Ammo belts on the B-17 waist guns made from narrow rubber bands, etc. Wish I still some of those models. Long gone, now. I do have a hell of a kit stash in my attic for the future, though. Mostly cars, trucks & armor. I did pick up a 1/32nd scale Spitfire kit at a local resale shop for $1. Someday...

"I fear all we have done was to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve". Vice Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto

 

Number of defenseless people rounded up & exterminated in the 20th century because of gun control: 56 MILLION!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.