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STRAC Patch

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So I was messing around this morning and re-discovered this in my collection. I was pretty sure I have not shown this one here before. In 20+ years of collecting it is the only one I have seen in person. I am unsure of its value or if it is "RARE", but I think it is cool so what else really matters!! So, enjoy the pictures and the info.

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Sell and / or trade items: http://s1080.photobucket.com/albums/j335/36tex/Military Collectables For Sale or Trade/

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STRAC was a designation given to the XVIII Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, in 1958. The designation was, in reality, the assignment of an additional mission rather than a true designation. The additional mission was to provide a flexible strike capability that could deploy worldwide on short notice without declaration of an emergency. The 4th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis, Washington, and the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, were designated as STRAC's first-line divisions, while the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas, and the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg were to provide backup in the event of general war. The 5th Logistical Command (later inactivated), also at Fort Bragg, would provide the corps with logistics support, while Fort Bragg's XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery would control artillery units.

 

Although the STRAC mission was to provide an easily deployable force for use in a limited war or other emergency, its ability to deploy overseas was limited by airlift constraints. Without the declaration of a national emergency, the required lift assets would not be released to support a STRAC deployment.

 

 

Other Definitions

STRAC is Army slang term for "a well organized, well turned-out soldier, (pressed uniform, polished brass and shined boots)." A proud, competent trooper who can be depended on for good performance in any circumstance.

 

Gear clean and tight; Weapon clean and ready; Mind clear, organized, and ready for action. S- skilled T- tough R- ready A- around the C- clock. STRAC


donation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

donation2015.gifdonation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif



Sell and / or trade items: http://s1080.photobucket.com/albums/j335/36tex/Military Collectables For Sale or Trade/

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STRAC was a designation given to the XVIII Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, in 1958. The designation was, in reality, the assignment of an additional mission rather than a true designation. The additional mission was to provide a flexible strike capability that could deploy worldwide on short notice without declaration of an emergency. The 4th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis, Washington, and the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, were designated as STRAC's first-line divisions, while the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas, and the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg were to provide backup in the event of general war. The 5th Logistical Command (later inactivated), also at Fort Bragg, would provide the corps with logistics support, while Fort Bragg's XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery would control artillery units.

 

Although the STRAC mission was to provide an easily deployable force for use in a limited war or other emergency, its ability to deploy overseas was limited by airlift constraints. Without the declaration of a national emergency, the required lift assets would not be released to support a STRAC deployment.

Other Definitions

STRAC is Army slang term for "a well organized, well turned-out soldier, (pressed uniform, polished brass and shined boots)." A proud, competent trooper who can be depended on for good performance in any circumstance.

 

Gear clean and tight; Weapon clean and ready; Mind clear, organized, and ready for action. S- skilled T- tough R- ready A- around the C- clock. STRAC

 

Just another aside, way back when, when I was an ROTC Cadet at Canisius College, STRAC was also applied to the scenarios used to grade you...it stood for Something (I don't remember the first word, getting old sucks!) Tactical Reaction Assesment Course, STRAC Lanes...these were a main grading tool at advanced camp the summer between your MSIII and MSIV years....don't know if its still the same....

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Mark,

 

Just sumbled across this patch killing time and totally agree with you, very seldom seen patch. I've been collecting for about 11 years and found one of these about 5 years ago on eBay under a wrong catagory. I immediatly noticed what it was but being a broke college student I begged and borrowed a roommate for the 10 dollar but it now price. Luckily he agreed (mostly because I promised a case of beer plus the 10$ on my pay day). I won the patch and have not seen once since, best case of beer I ever spent at the time!


"Remember Bataan, Never Forget"

Actively looking for U.S. Army Run/Swim/Walk For Your Life patches.

 

Treasurer, ASMIC

Area V VP, ASMIC

www.asmic.org


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That is a rather unique patch!

Just as a side note, one of my TAC's at military school, a retired CSM, always joked that STRAC stood for "Stupid Troopers Running Around in Circles!" nonetheless, because of that, I've never known what STRAC actually stood for until now. Thanks for posting.

Gary


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Actively seeking North Carolina and 30th infantry Division-related items from all periods.

Also looking for items belonging to veterans that went to The Citadel in Charleston.

 

Troop D, 1-150th Cavalry RGT, 30th HBCT. M1A1 SEP Tank Commander.

OMSA member #7423

US Army Historical Foundation Charter Member

US Army Brotherhood of Tankers member

American Association For State and Local History

Southeasren Museums Conference

Southeastern Registrars Association

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Gear clean and tight; Weapon clean and ready; Mind clear, organized, and ready for action. S- skilled T- tough R- ready A- around the C- clock. STRAC

 

When I was stationed at Fort Bragg in 1969, STRAC was jokingly referred to as " S--t The Russians Are Coming"

 

Mike


SFMike

 

F Company, 50th Infantry (LRRP)

 

A-361, 3rd Mobile Strike Force (B-36)

Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (ABN)

 

 

 

RIP Steven Collier, 1968

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