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USNR - U.S. Naval Reserve - on land, sea and air


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VAK-208 JOCKEYS - USNR - When the Naval Air Reserve was reorganized in 1970 Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 208 was established on July 31 at NAS Alameda, California, as part of Carrier Air Wing Twenty. Equipped with KA-3Bs to support CVWR-20 operations, VAQ-208 also began providing air refueling and pathfinding for Navy and Marine tactical aircraft being ferried to Southeast Asia.



During the 1971 India-Pakistan conflict and the 1973 Yom Kippur War, VAQ-208 jointly with VAQ-308 provided crews and aircraft to support emergency deployments of U.S. Naval aircraft. During the seventies, the squadron also provided tanking platforms for test and development of the Lockheed S-3A Viking and Grumman F-14A Tomcat.


On 1 October 1979, in recognition of its primary use as a refueling and pathfinding unit, the squadron was redesignated VAK-208. They were disestablished 30 September 1989.

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Here is a patch from carrier antisubmarine squadron VS-912, which was a Naval Air Reserve unit at NAS Squantum (1951 to 1953) and NAS South Weymouth (1953 - 1967). Over the years this squadron operated TBM Avengers, AF Guardians, and S2F Trackers.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

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Here is a patch from carrier antisubmarine squadron VS-913, which was a Naval Air Reserve unit at NAS South Weymouth between 1955 and 1962. This squadron operated AF Guardians and S2F Trackers. It was known as “The Down-Easter Squadron” because many of its personnel resided in the state of Maine. An airlift was provided to fly squadron personnel from NAS Brunswick to NAS South Weymouth and back on their drill weekends. Note, there was another VS-913 that was formed at NAS Squantum in 1951. This earlier squadron was activated for the Korean War. It was transferred from NAS Squantum to NAS Quonset Point and redesignated VS-39. This earlier squadron had no connection to the later squadron, other than the designation. The Navy considers them to have been different units.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

 

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Here is a patch from carrier antisubmarine squadron VS-914, which was a Naval Air Reserve unit at NAS South Weymouth between 1956 and 1962. This squadron operated S2F Trackers.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

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Here is a patch from carrier antisubmarine squadron VS-915, which was a Naval Air Reserve unit at NAS South Weymouth between 1956 and 1965. This squadron operated S2F Trackers. It was activated for a year between October 1961 and August 1962 as part of a show of force for the Berlin Crisis.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

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Here is a patch from carrier antisubmarine squadron VS-916, which was a Naval Air Reserve unit at NAS South Weymouth between 1958 and 1962. This squadron operated S2F Trackers. It was formed in part from personnel from disbanded airship patrol squadron ZP-911.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

 

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Here is a patch from carrier antisubmarine squadron VS-733. This was a Naval Air Reserve unit that was based as NAS Grosse Ille. It was activated for the Berlin Crisis in 1961. Since Michigan was too far from the ocean for operational purposes, the squadron was deployed NAS South Weymouth between November 1961 and June 1962. It operated S2F Trackers.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

 

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Navy Reserve transport squadron VR-62 was transferred from NAF Detroit to NAS South Weymouth in 1995 due to its former base being closed by the Base Realignment and Closure Commission. Unfortunately, the BRAC soon closed NAS South Weymouth, so VR-62 and its C-130s did not remain there for long. During the two years the squadron was at NAS South Weymouth, it used this patch with the motto "Mass Transit". The "Mass" stood for "Massachusetts".

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

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After Navy Reserve transport squadron VR-62 was transferred from NAS South Weymouth to NAS Brunswick in 1996 it adopted this insignia. The squadron adopted a new motto while at NAS Brunswick, that being "The Nor'Easters".

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

 

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There were two Patrol Squadron Master Augment Units during the 1980s, one at NAS Brunswick, Maine and the other at NAS Moffat Field, California. The VP MAUs, as they were called, were unusual reserve units. Technically, they weren't Reserve Force Squadrons or RESFORONS, they were Squadron Augment Units or SAUs. Unlike the RESFORON VP squadrons, which would be activated as a complete unit in time of national emergency, the SAU VP MAUs were intended to provide replacements for regular Navy VP squadrons. Each reservist in the VP MAUs was assigned a mobilization billet in a regular Navy patrol squadron either at NAS Brunswick (in the case of the VP MAU at NAS Brunswick) or at NAS Moffat Field (in the case of the VP MAU there). This is the patch used by the VP MAU at NAS Brunswick, which was operational between 1983 and 1991. The insignia was designed by an NFO, LT Terry Brissette.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

 

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In November 1970 reserve patrol squadron VP-92 was formed at NAS South Weymouth. The squadron was the result of a major reorganization of the Naval Air Reserve that had all existing reserve squadrons disbanded and replaced by new units that more closely conformed to the regular Navy squadron organizational structure, took ownership of their own aircraft, and were composed of both active duty and part time personnel. This is the first of two insignias used by the squadron and is closely associated with the period when they flew SP-2H Neptunes. It was designed by squadron member Lee Bureau.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

 

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This is the second insignia used by reserve patrol squadron VP-92. It was designed by squadron member Tammy Budlong in 1979 and is associated with the period when the squadron operated P-3 Orions. This same basic design was used from 1979 to 2007, when the squadron was disbanded at NAS Brunswick. This is the first version of the patch. In later years, slightly different (and smaller) variants were used. If you check elsewhere on this forum I put my collection of various VP-92 patch variants up here some time ago. I was in VP-92 myself from 1990 to 1999 and have a pretty comprehensive collection of insignia used by the squadron over the years.

 

I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them.

 

Marc

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

Fleet Composite Squadron Thirteen (VC-13) SAINTS, New Orleans based USNR Crusader Squadron (1973). Now a west coast adversary squadron, VFC-13 FIGHTING SAINTS



The "Fighting Saints" of VFC-13 can trace their origins back to 1946, when VF-753 was commissioned flying F6F-5 "Hellcats." Today's squadron was formed on Sept. 1, 1973, at N.A.S. New Orleans during the reorganization of the U.S. Naval Reserve.


Initially, the squadron operated the Chance Vought F-8H "Crusader" with a complement of 17 officers and 127 enlisted men, former members of VSF-76 and VSF-86. In April 1974, the "Saints" made the transition to the single-seat A-4L "Skyhawk."


As the demand for west coast adversary services and other fleet support missions increased, the squadron was permanently transferred to N.A.S. Miramar, arriving there in February 1976.


Source: CNIC Naval Air Station Fallon, NV


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Reserve Fleet 1947-1960, Naval History and Heritage Command Archives

 

Groups of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet include Boston, Charleston, Florida, New London, New York, Norfolk, Philadelphia, and Texas. The groups of the Pacific Reserve Fleet include Alameda, Bremerton, Columbia River, Long Beach, Mare Island, San Diego, San Francisco, Stockton, and Tacoma.

 

Norfolk Group Atlantic Reserve Fleet

 

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Philadelphia Group Atlantic Reserve Fleet, 4th Naval District

 

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Naval Reserve Fleet Division 3-7D Advancement, Training, Leadership - Radarman (now Operations Specialist), Gunners Mate, Engineman

Naval Reserve Training Center, Washington Square, Rochester, NY circa 1957

 

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NAVAL AIR STATION WASHINGTON (ANACOSTIA to ANDREWS)

 

Due to Anacostia's short runways, the Naval Air Station moved to Andrews Air Force Base in 1958 to facilitate jet operations. The transfer to Andrews AFB was complete by December 1961, concurrent with the commissioning of the new Naval Air Facility.

 

In April 1972, NARTU Washington became Naval Air Reserve Unit Washington with the primary mission of training Selected Reservists. NARU included VFP-206, VFP-306, VR-42 and 20 other tactical and non-tactical units. Since 1976, the logistics support mission of NAF Washington has included administrative transport flight operations and transient service support to arriving aircraft.

 

NARTU WASHINGTON (NAVAL AIR RESERVE TRAINING UNIT ANDREWS)

 

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