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WW1 91st Division Uniform / Groupings


Navybean
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Thanks, I really like the 91st. Division as the troops were mainly from the Pacific NW, Idaho, MT, OR and WA. I have been to France Meuse Argonne area where did most of their fighting during WW1 and soon I hope to visit the Ypres battle field where they served briefly with the British during First World War.

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  • 2 months later...

This is the grouping of Orlando and Oscar Patterson. Orlando served in Co. A, 361st Infantry, while Oscar served in Co. G, 362nd Infantry.

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This uniform and tags are named to Martin M. McCormick. The collar disk doesn't appear correct and I'm having his V.A. Card pulled to verify his unit and make sure this isn't a complete put-together...

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Grouping named to Frederick G. Rouse of Co. M, 362nd Infantry, 91st Division. He was from Bay City, Michigan. If anyone can find anything about him let me know. He's in the regimental history, but I can't seem to find a draft registration card, service record, etc.

 

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I figure I might as well post some of my latest purchases here.

 

This is the grouping of Frank H. Baxter, Co. M, 362nd Infantry, 91st Division

 

More photos can be seen here: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/257048-frank-baxter-co-m-362nd-infantry-91st-division/

 

 

 

That is a fantastic group, great that the pine tree matches the picture and is a great variation of the patch

Thanks for posting

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  • 3 weeks later...

Instead of clogging up the forum with 91st stuff, I'll just keep posting it here.

 

This small letter grouping is named to Sigurd Manfred Samuelson of Co. I, 362nd Infantry, 91st division and Oscar Samuelson who served in the U.S. Navy. My favorite parts of these letters are when Sigurd states that he's no longer working for his father, but rather working for his uncle (Uncle Sam). Oscar also states that he heard that there had been 30,000 deserters in the Navy. I'm also hoping to someday stumble upon a photograph that Sigurd mentions he had taken with some of his buddies. You can read the full transcripts here: https://www.facebook.com/PineTreeDivision/

 

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I also was lucky enough to pick up this wool shirt thanks to a fellow forum member. What's so great about this one is that it's original owner put the pine tree patch along with an honorable discharge and overseas chevron on it. It was also used in Alexander Barnes's book To Hell With the Kaiser.

 

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I also was lucky enough to pick up this wool shirt thanks to a fellow forum member. What's so great about this one is that it's original owner put the pine tree patch along with an honorable discharge and overseas chevron on it. It was also used in Alexander Barnes's book To Hell With the Kaiser.

 

Love the shirt, never had a 91st with patch

 

Thanks for sharing

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  • 5 months later...

Adding to this thread, I just recently bought this 91st helmet, named to Anchor Rasmussen. He served in Company K, 361st Infantry, 91st Division and was severely wounded in October of 1918. When he signed up for the draft he was living in Turner, Blaine County, Montana. Afterwards he moved to Lake County and then even later to Missoula, Missoula County.

 

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  • 2 years later...

I haven't been as active on the forum as I should be, so I've got several items I'd like to post pictures of, and would love to "revive" this thread and encourage others to share some of their 91st stuff. The first thing I would like to post is this set of dogtags named to Andrew Schmidt of Company F, 361st Infantry Regiment, 91st Division.

 

Andrew Schmidt was born on October 31st, 1893 in Hillsboro, Kansas. By 1917, his family had moved to Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California, where Andrew registered for the draft. Andrew, at the time, was working at the Pasadena Cannery. Andrew was inducted in the United States Army, and was assigned to Company F, 361st Infantry, 91st Division. He sailed to France on July 6th, 1918 aboard the Scoatian and returned to the States on April 15th, 1919 aboard the USS Mexican. By 1940, Andrew was working for himself as a Carpenter. In 1942, Andrew registered for the draft once again, stating that he worked for the California Institute of Technology. Andrew Schmidt passed away in January 1975 in Pasadena, California at the age of 82.

 

 

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This is a helmet I got recently off of eBay. I like that the name was written on it, similarly to another helmet I have.

 

Marion Gilette Bennett was born on March 29th, 1892 to Cyrus and Ella Bennett in Stearns, Lewis and Clark County, Montana. In 1910, the family was living in the Stearns (which would later be incorporated into Wolf Creek, Montana) where they farmed, and Marion worked as a laborer. On June 5th, 1917 Marion registered for the draft out of Lewis and Clark County, Montana. He was inducted into the United States Army on October 4th, 1917 in Helena Montana. He was assigned to 32 Battalion, 166th Depot Brigade until October 25th, 1917 at which point, he was assigned to Company K, 362nd Infantry, 91st Division. He made the rank of Private 1st Class Mechanic in January of 1918 and shipped out to France July 6th, 1918. During his service, he fought at the Battles of St. Mihiel and the Meuse Argonne. On October 9th, 1918 Marion was slightly wounded during operations in the Meuse Argonne. Marion served in France until April 14th, 1919 and was discharged on May 2nd, 1919. In 1920, Marion returned to the family home and worked as a farm laborer. He married Viola Dixon of Wolf Creek, Montana on July 13th, 1922. By 1930, the family had moved to Great Falls, Cascade County, Montana, where Marion was working as a public utility electrician. The couple had two children, Lois and Lawrence. On January 31st, 1958 Marion Bennett passed away at age 65 at his home in Wolf Creek, Lewis and Clark County, Montana due to Pulmonary Emphysema. He is buried at Sunset Memorial Gardens in Helena, Montana.

 

 

 

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I snagged this uniform off of Facebook from a dealer, and I'm very happy with it, in spite of the removal of all of the patches.

 

Philip Curtis Bridgham was born December 7th, 1895 in Everett, Washington to Melvin and Margarett Bridgham. In 1910, the family lived in Everett, where the father worked and Philip and his brother attended school. In 1916, Philip at age 20 began work as a Mail Messenger for the U.S. Post Office. In 1917, Philip registered for the Draft and was inducted on October 3rd, 1917.He was assigned to 166 Depot Brigade until October 25th, 1917, then assigned to Company C, 361st Infantry, 91st Division. On July 6th, 1918 Philip saile to France on the ship Karoa. In France, he was promoted to Corporal on September 27th, 1918. He sailed home on the ship Calamares on April 16th, 1919 and was discharged on April 30th, 1919. On May 7th, 1919 Philip married Doris Easterly, and together they had a son and a daughter. Philip worked for the U.S. Postal Service from 1916 to 1956, then as a school bus driver from 1957 to 1966. On November 7th, 1988 Philip passed away at age 88, and is buried in Cypress Lawn Cemetery.

 

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This is a helmet I got recently off of eBay. I like that the name was written on it, similarly to another helmet I have.

 

Marion Gilette Bennett was born on March 29th, 1892 to Cyrus and Ella Bennett in Stearns, Lewis and Clark County, Montana. In 1910, the family was living in the Stearns (which would later be incorporated into Wolf Creek, Montana) where they farmed, and Marion worked as a laborer. On June 5th, 1917 Marion registered for the draft out of Lewis and Clark County, Montana. He was inducted into the United States Army on October 4th, 1917 in Helena Montana. He was assigned to 32 Battalion, 166th Depot Brigade until October 25th, 1917 at which point, he was assigned to Company K, 362nd Infantry, 91st Division. He made the rank of Private 1st Class Mechanic in January of 1918 and shipped out to France July 6th, 1918. During his service, he fought at the Battles of St. Mihiel and the Meuse Argonne. On October 9th, 1918 Marion was slightly wounded during operations in the Meuse Argonne. Marion served in France until April 14th, 1919 and was discharged on May 2nd, 1919. In 1920, Marion returned to the family home and worked as a farm laborer. He married Viola Dixon of Wolf Creek, Montana on July 13th, 1922. By 1930, the family had moved to Great Falls, Cascade County, Montana, where Marion was working as a public utility electrician. The couple had two children, Lois and Lawrence. On January 31st, 1958 Marion Bennett passed away at age 65 at his home in Wolf Creek, Lewis and Clark County, Montana due to Pulmonary Emphysema. He is buried at Sunset Memorial Gardens in Helena, Montana.

 

 

 

Great helmet. I have a number of painted 91st helmets but none with painted name on the top nice piece

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  • 7 months later...

After a long absence I've picked up a handful of items I'd like to share. Anyone else with 91st items are strongly encouraged to do so as well.

 

Maurice Ludwig Johnson was born on April 11th, 1893 to Swedish immigrants in Seattle, Washington. Maurice registered for the draft June 5th, 1917 out of Selah, Washington, where he was presently employed as a farmer. Maurice was inducted into the U.S. Army out of Yakima, Washington on April 25th, 1918. He was assigned to the 166th Depot Brigade in Camp Lewis, Washington until May 24th, 1918, when he was assigned to Company C, 347th Machine Gun Battalion, 91st Division. Maurice served overseas from July 6th, 1918 until April 20th, 1918. During his time overseas, he participated in all of the major campaigns of the 91st, including St Mihiel, Meuse Argonne, and Ypres-Lys. Maurice as discharged May 9th, 1919. By 1920, Maurice had retuned to his farm in Selah, Washington and was married to Ruth Johnson. By 1930, Maurice and Ruth had two daughters, Helen and Maurine, and was working on as a fruit farmer on his own farm. By 1940, Maurice was still employed as a fruit farmer. Maurice L Johnson passed away September 15th, 1971 in Selah, and is buried in Terrace Heights Memorial Park, Yakima, Washington.

 

 

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