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Post The Pre War 1920s-30s Unit Crest Being Worn

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Need help on this one of a mid to late-sh 1930s Hawaii Coast Artillery soldier, Hawaiian Separate Coastal Artillery Brigade.

 

Now this one was first posted by seanmc1114, but he don't list regiment.

 

 

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A Soldier of the 20th Infantry, 2nd Division late 20s, 20th Infantry assigned to the 2nd Division, 18 Sept 1920- 16 Oct 1939, there's the badge worn above the flap this time :lol:. It's interesting to note that he's not wearing French Rope, the 20th Infantry was not in the Indianhead Division in the World War, so they just didn't wear one, nor does the one in post #33 the 1st Infantry, 2nd Division soldier posted by seanmc1114, again a regiment not with the division, and just assigned at random in the 1920s post WW period.

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attachicon.gifpost-1761-0-60008600-1392484659.jpg

 

Need help on this one of a mid to late-sh 1930s Hawaii Coast Artillery soldier, Hawaiian Separate Coastal Artillery Brigade.

 

Now this one was first posted by seanmc1114, but he don't list regiment.

 

 

41st Coast Artillery


OVMS

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A Soldier of the 20th Infantry, 2nd Division late 20s, 20th Infantry assigned to the 2nd Division, 18 Sept 1920- 16 Oct 1939, there's the badge worn above the flap this time :lol:. It's interesting to note that he's not wearing French Rope, the 20th Infantry was not in the Indianhead Division in the World War, so they just didn't wear one, nor does the one in post #33 the 1st Infantry, 2nd Division soldier posted by seanmc1114, again a regiment not with the division, and just assigned at random in the 1920s post WW period.

And here's more on this one, from an old topic form 2007 started by member Championhilz, a great topic as you'll see.

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/11507-2nd-infantry-division-photograph/&do=findComment&comment=72380

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A Cpt Dennis Pillsbury 38th Infantry 3rd Division in the mid-ish 1920s Fort Douglas UT.

 

post-34986-0-46378300-1525837512_thumb.jpgpost-34986-0-37265500-1525837527.jpg

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A fabulous portrait of one CPT Hugh L. Mays CO of M Co 124th Infantry 31st "Dixie" Division 1928. Some interesting features here, note he's not wearing his rank, but he is wearing his Marksmanship Badge, he was a pilot in the Great War, but I can't find more on that.

 

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A twofer for FT Benning's Infantry School.

 

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Found another Movie related Unit Crest being worn, here in a obscure 1929 movie called His First Command, now the two posting show a DI worn in the movie by actors in it, the only image so far that I could find, the soldiers are supposedly Cavalry, so maybe it's the 13th Cavalry (Adoption date, James Sawicki, January 1923), hard to tell, zoom in on it and let me know what you think. The other is the period theater placard with a stylized depiction of the DI worn (note the loop on the top of this one in the placard, this loop doesn't seem to be present in the ones being worn by the actors).

 

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https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0019987/

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That's no "loop." It's the front ventilation eyelet of the service hat. The DUI when worn on the service hat was placed below the eyelet.

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That's no "loop." It's the front ventilation eyelet of the service hat. The DUI when worn on the service hat was placed below the eyelet.

Ah ha, yes it is, they made it the same color really as that blurred ill defined DI. which when we look at it does resemble in a way the DI of the 13th Cav.

 

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Two from my collection.

 

5KuVePY.jpg

Best seen on the central officer, the 103rd Infantry's crest in 1939.

 

tjlxjP0.png

This 5th Infantry crest is on a wagon labelled "5th Infantry Headquarters Co." circa the mid 1920s.

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I believe this bugler at Fort Sheridan, Illinois in 1938 is from the 15th Infantry Regiment

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I believe this bugler at Fort Sheridan, Illinois in 1938 is from the 15th Infantry Regiment

 

Bugle tabbard is for 3rd FA Regt. Redes 3rd AFA Bn 1941.


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Bugle tabbard is for 3rd FA Regt. Redes 3rd AFA Bn 1941.

Thanks for the ID. I don't know why I assumed he was from an infantry regiment.

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No idea if this counts because it's post-WWII, but the 306th Cavalry DI painted on helmet liners in 1955.

 

psnKIzY.jpg

 

And 319th Infantry on helmet liners in 1951.

 

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An obscure unit for sure the 306th Armored Cavalry Regiment, a unit of the Active Reserves in the 1950s, based in Maryland, thus the 2nd Army patch worn, Armies back then controlled most if not all non divisional sepearte units of the reserves where ever they might of been located and under the Army's geographical command/jurisdiction. Armies control over USAR units of this type was taken over by Corps by the very late 50s, IE VI Corps, VIII Corps, XVI Corps etc etc.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/306th_Armored_Cavalry_Regiment

 

Good shot of another obscure unit ozzle, the 80th Airborne Division, here's hoping you find photos of this unit where the patch with AIRBORNE tab are seen. So far the only one posted of one of these reseve airborne divisions, is one of the 84th Airborne Division, and that's only one photo (if you haven't seen it yet, do a search, or I'll find it for you and link it).

 

 

As to the posting of these photos in this topic, I refer you to the Marked Liners topic, that's the correct topic for decaled helmet liners.

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/19550-marked-helmet-liners-the-unsung-hero-of-the-m-1/

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The first actually comes from a book I've got on the 306th. They were a very active outfit, lot of esprit de corps, considering it's the only unit I know of that had a book written about them twenty years after they were disbanded.

 

I posted a hard-to-see 100th AB in the SSI thread where you can just see the AIRBORNE tab.

 

Knew I was forgetting something. Thanks for the thread reminder.

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Here is an image I recently acquired out of a local antique store in Denver. Nice Pre-WWII studio portrait taken in New York of a 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division soldier. Sadly, no name associated.

 

- Henry

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I'll let the original poster of this photo say it all :D

 

Wailuna

 

Here are a couple of Hawaii National Guard officers ca. 1935. The Captain (right) is wearing 298th Inf. DI (ASMIC 298A) on his service hat and epaulettes. The Lieutenant is wearing 299th Inf. DI (ASMIC 299A). Both DIs were locally "authorized" in 1931 by Headquarters, Hawaii National Guard (G.O. Nos. 26 and 39, respectively). The Hawaii designs were supplanted in 1936 by completely different Army Q.M.G. designs authorized in 1936. However, the Hawaii design 299th Inf. DI is believed to have been commonly worn when your Lt. Jones joined the regiment in 1941 and until its activation in 1942. Which version of the 298th Inf. DI was worn in 1943 (if any) is unknown. Image courtesy of the Kiaiokalewa collection:

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These are the late 30s DI's for the 298th Infantry and 299th Infantry.

 

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Found this great one in a small article (Focus on People on the occasion of his full retirement at age 70 from the civil service) the October 1975 issue of Soldiers Magazine of one Walter Kraus, born in the USA (Mahanoy City Penna) circa 1904-05, presumably of German or German Balt stock from Lithuania (Can't find much on this Walter online, but the surname pops up a lot in searches for this local in Penna). Info in this brief article is sparse and not to detailed, but from what I can glean, is that shortly before the Great War, presumably like in the spring of 1914, Kraus now 9 visits the old country with his Mom, his Mom dies very unexpectedly of some unknown cause, illness, heart attack???

 

He's taken in by a town neighbor, and presumably his Dad back in America is contacted, but in the meantime they in essence adopt the boy. Problem is in a very short while the war starts, Russian troops mass in Lithuania to invade Germany, and as the Russian Steamroller moves forward, these people move out, they flee to Latvia. The Russians are defeated in those battles in East Prussia as we know and flee themselves. In Latvia the boy gets lost and is found by a Russian unit that take him in, says they give him a rifle and make him a soldier, don't know how accurate that would be in 1914, not even in 1917, we know they did use young soldiers at a point the Russians but a 9 year old! Ah maybe, anyway what little it says was Kraus was wounded near the front, and presumably left alone and behind after being presumably treated, and presumbaly in the spring of 1915 when the Germans advance east into Lativia. and then he presumably rejoins somehow that family he came into Latvia with.

 

 

Well after the war in 1921 with a clear way now to travel to that part of Europe, his Father comes to get him and brings him back to America, don't know if he's back in Lithuania or still in Latvia

 

Fast forward to Youngstown Ohio in 1926, presumably where he lives then, Kraus enlists in the Army, trained as an Engineer, he spends 32 years in the Army, retiring in 1958 as a Master Sergeant, again no info is given, but we can presume he served in WWII, as well as Korea, but in action or not is not given. After retiring he is employed as a civil servant craftsman at that Army post at Cameron Station Virginia till 1975 when he retires :D.

 

So now the photos :lol:

 

By this photo, the very reason why I'm posting all this, is we do see he in the early stage of his service served in the Panama Canal Zone in the 11th Engineer Regiment, it's an early photo showing the DIs being worn behind the discs, like say 1926-27, the Hellgate patch is viewable too.

 

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And Walter back then in 1975, looking good at 70 years of age :)

 

post-34986-0-40771300-1540695307.jpg

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BlHTqdZ.jpg

Master Sergeant Jack Clapp works on signs for the 45th Infantry Division Association meeting in 1959. MSgt. Clapp is wearing the 1920s to 1946 45th Infantry Division DUI on his epaulets. He retired as a Sergeant Major after serving in WWII and Korea, providing substantial amounts of art and memorabilia to the 45th ID museum according to his 1987 obit. In 1965 he was one of 77 Oklahoma Guardsmen on active duty who had been called up with the division on Sept. 16, 1940.

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Members of the 121st Infantry Regiment of the Georgia National Guard in 1933. The DUI's of the 121st are mirrored Old Gray Bonnets. Note that all of the soldiers are wearing their DUI's oriented the same way except for the one in the lower right corner.

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Found this great one in a small article (Focus on People on the occasion of his full retirement at age 70 from the civil service) the October 1975 issue of Soldiers Magazine of one Walter Kraus, born in the USA (Mahanoy City Penna) circa 1904-05, presumably of German or German Balt stock from Lithuania (Can't find much on this Walter online, but the surname pops up a lot in searches for this local in Penna). Info in this brief article is sparse and not to detailed, but from what I can glean, is that shortly before the Great War, presumably like in the spring of 1914, Kraus now 9 visits the old country with his Mom, his Mom dies very unexpectedly of some unknown cause, illness, heart attack???

 

He's taken in by a town neighbor, and presumably his Dad back in America is contacted, but in the meantime they in essence adopt the boy. Problem is in a very short while the war starts, Russian troops mass in Lithuania to invade Germany, and as the Russian Steamroller moves forward, these people move out, they flee to Latvia. The Russians are defeated in those battles in East Prussia as we know and flee themselves. In Latvia the boy gets lost and is found by a Russian unit that take him in, says they give him a rifle and make him a soldier, don't know how accurate that would be in 1914, not even in 1917, we know they did use young soldiers at a point the Russians but a 9 year old! Ah maybe, anyway what little it says was Kraus was wounded near the front, and presumably left alone and behind after being presumably treated, and presumbaly in the spring of 1915 when the Germans advance east into Lativia. and then he presumably rejoins somehow that family he came into Latvia with.

 

 

Well after the war in 1921 with a clear way now to travel to that part of Europe, his Father comes to get him and brings him back to America, don't know if he's back in Lithuania or still in Latvia

 

Fast forward to Youngstown Ohio in 1926, presumably where he lives then, Kraus enlists in the Army, trained as an Engineer, he spends 32 years in the Army, retiring in 1958 as a Master Sergeant, again no info is given, but we can presume he served in WWII, as well as Korea, but in action or not is not given. After retiring he is employed as a civil servant craftsman at that Army post at Cameron Station Virginia till 1975 when he retires :D.

 

So now the photos :lol:

 

By this photo, the very reason why I'm posting all this, is we do see he in the early stage of his service served in the Panama Canal Zone in the 11th Engineer Regiment, it's an early photo showing the DIs being worn behind the discs, like say 1926-27, the Hellgate patch is viewable too.

 

attachicon.gifphpCfuQxOPM.jpgattachicon.giftaal16m00.jpg

 

And Walter back then in 1975, looking good at 70 years of age :)

 

attachicon.gifphp4hYHrOPM.jpg

Well here's a group of very young boys in the Imperial Army in the Great War, probably during the Kerensky Offensive period in 1917.

 

post-34986-0-94809500-1548392551_thumb.jpg

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