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* Car Tag Plates - Saving Metal WWII *


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Thanks Trenchrat for adding some beautiful plates. I especially like the defense bonds one. Do you have any idea if this was supposed to be attached to a car?

 

Rene

Never give in - never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.

 

Churchill

 

Keep buggering on.

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Thanks Trenchrat for adding some beautiful plates. I especially like the defense bonds one. Do you have any idea if this was supposed to be attached to a car?

 

Rene

 

Hello Rene, yes I believe that it was supposed to go on a car. It is the same size as a regular plate and the holes all lineup. It has the Mobil Oil symbol on it so it may have been a giveaway or you could purchase at your local station, hopefully someone with a lot more knowledge can weigh in. I have always assumed that it would go on the front of a car as some states like Michigan only require a rear plate.

Wes

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Mobil Gas 'Buy Defense Bonds' plate on fiberboard

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Hi Wes, thanks for adding your plates and another soybean plate, still don't have one of those. Thanks also for adding the Defense Bond plate, that's encouraged me to add this Navy recruiting plate, it appears to have some age to it and would be nice if I could attribute it to WWII period if possible, perhaps the use of the word ' Service ' might give a clue.

 

Lewis.

 

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Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

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Very nice additions gentleman. All of these help illustrate the other side of the war, that is sometimes elusive to see compared to the combat area of it.

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

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Hi Wes, thanks for adding your plates and another soybean plate, still don't have one of those. Thanks also for adding the Defense Bond plate, that's encouraged me to add this Navy recruiting plate, it appears to have some age to it and would be nice if I could attribute it to WWII period if possible, perhaps the use of the word ' Service ' might give a clue.

 

Lewis.

 

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Hi Ken, I did a quick search but not much came up. There are a few examples for sale and they are advertised as 40s plates but I don't know how accurate that info is.

 

Rene

Never give in - never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.

 

Churchill

 

Keep buggering on.

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Unfortunately I don't have any special plates to show so here is a standard Missouri '44 plate.

 

post-169612-0-69967200-1524144043_thumb.jpg

 

Rene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Never give in - never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.

 

Churchill

 

Keep buggering on.

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I find those soybean plates interesting. In this day of eco-friendly materials, you would think something along those lines would have been put to use in mainstream products. Just when I'm thinking it may be time to throttle back on collecting, something like these come along and make me want to find one.

Mikie

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Thank you, everyone, for posting some cool plates. I find the way each state approached the metal shortage very interesting. Some states issued metal tags some used soybean fiber plates and some just ignored the problem and kept on doing what they did before the war.

 

Does anyone have an example of a restamped/overstamped plate? Apparently, some states were already making plates in pairs when the decision to was made to only use a rear plate. The 2nd plate was often flattened and restamped and then issued. Here is a picture I had on my computer, unfortunately, I do not remember where the photo came from.

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Thank you, everyone, for posting some cool plates. I find the way each state approached the metal shortage very interesting. Some states issued metal tags some used soybean fiber plates and some just ignored the problem and kept on doing what they did before the war.

 

Does anyone have an example of a restamped/overstamped plate? Apparently, some states were already making plates in pairs when the decision to was made to only use a rear plate. The 2nd plate was often flattened and restamped and then issued. Here is a picture I had on my computer, unfortunately, I do not remember where the photo came from.

Haven't seen these before. Thanks for posting.

 

This raises another question (well, for me at least :) ) Has anyone ever seen a 1943 dated plate? I'm under the impression that these were not made at all due to metal shortages and that the tags were used instead. Am I correct?

 

Rene

Never give in - never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.

 

Churchill

 

Keep buggering on.

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Haven't seen these before. Thanks for posting.

 

This raises another question (well, for me at least :) ) Has anyone ever seen a 1943 dated plate? I'm under the impression that these were not made at all due to metal shortages and that the tags were used instead. Am I correct?

 

Rene

There are currently a couple of 1943 restamped South Carolina plates on everyone's favorite auction site right now. I would post the link but it's not letting me at the moment, maybe someone else will have better luck.

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Thank you, everyone, for posting some cool plates. I find the way each state approached the metal shortage very interesting. Some states issued metal tags some used soybean fiber plates and some just ignored the problem and kept on doing what they did before the war.

 

Does anyone have an example of a restamped/overstamped plate? Apparently, some states were already making plates in pairs when the decision to was made to only use a rear plate. The 2nd plate was often flattened and restamped and then issued. Here is a picture I had on my computer, unfortunately, I do not remember where the photo came from.

I had thought that 1944 was the only year for soybean fiber plates in Virginia, but I was wrong here is a set of Virginia truck plates made of soybean board from 1942, pretty early in the war for a state to be on board with this. It also explains what they did in 1943 merely an addition of a corner tag stamped with the 1943 year indicating the owner has paid his road tax. These are ultra cool but very rare, especially in this shape.

 

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Hi everyone, such an interesting topic for me, and I thought I would share this photograph I just found showing military Jeeps with pressed metal plates dated 1947, another style of plate to be looking for while we are out there searching for additional plates for our collections.

 

Lewis.

 

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.

Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

.

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Hahahaaaaa, well I visited a friend this afternoon with a holiday home over here in Normandy, he had a couple of plates up on the wall and first up is yet another PENNA plate, dated 1937.

 

Lewis.

 

.post-344-0-72756100-1524849270_thumb.jpg

.

Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

.

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

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I visited a friend this afternoon with a holiday home over here in Normandy, he had a couple of plates up on the wall and although this plate doesn't really fit into the background of this thread ' WWII plates and saving metal ' I thought it interesting as he bought it in Georgia whilst visiting the Toccoa museum and Toccoa is shown on the plate.

 

Lewis.

 

.post-344-0-58215500-1524849575_thumb.jpg

.

Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

.

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

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I visited a friend this afternoon with a holiday home over here in Normandy, he had a couple of plates up on the wall and although this plate doesn't really fit into the background of this thread ' WWII plates and saving metal ' I thought it interesting as he bought it in Georgia whilst visiting the Toccoa museum and Toccoa is shown on the plate.

 

Lewis.

 

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Interesting plate. I had no idea they used these way back in 1664!

Mikie

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well, let's see if we can keep this thread going..........what is noticeable about this Kansas plate is that it is relatively small compared to other '44 plates from other states. Maybe still a way to save metal.

 

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Rene

 

 

Never give in - never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.

 

Churchill

 

Keep buggering on.

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Well, let's see if we can keep this thread going..........what is noticeable about this Kansas plate is that it is relatively small compared to other '44 plates from other states. Maybe still a way to save metal.

 

attachicon.gifSAM_3351 Kansas.jpg

 

Rene

Cool plate, do you have measurements? While surfing the web tonight I found a site that has the types of wartime plates listed by state and year and they say that Kansas produced a full sized 1942 plate and a tab in 43 then small plates in 44 and 45. When I figure out how to do it I will link the page to this thread. Wes

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<a href="http://wwiijeepparts.com/index.html"><img src="http://wwiijeepparts.com/WW2/Photos/Jeep/WillysMBFordGPWpARTs/btnGREENdrive.gif" width="99" height="36" border="0" name="Brians Military Jeeps of WWII" alt="Go to Brians Military Jeeps of WWII at www.Drive.To/WWII"></a>

 

Here is the link to a cool site I found tonight they have a full list of wartime plates produced by state along with lots of pictures of military plates, toppers, and restamped plates. The page is not the easiest to navigate but it has a ton of information. Wes

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Thanks for the link,Wes! Great site with lots of info.

 

The measurements of the Kansas plate are: width 10 inches (25,5 cm), height just under 4,5 inch (11 cm)

 

Rene

Never give in - never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.

 

Churchill

 

Keep buggering on.

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<a href="http://wwiijeepparts.com/index.html"><img src="http://wwiijeepparts.com/WW2/Photos/Jeep/WillysMBFordGPWpARTs/btnGREENdrive.gif" width="99" height="36" border="0" name="Brians Military Jeeps of WWII" alt="Go to Brians Military Jeeps of WWII at www.Drive.To/WWII"></a>

 

Here is the link to a cool site I found tonight they have a full list of wartime plates produced by state along with lots of pictures of military plates, toppers, and restamped plates. The page is not the easiest to navigate but it has a ton of information. Wes

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Hi Wes, thanks for the link, I took a quick look and then had to laugh when I spotted one of my photographs that I had posted here on this forum a few years ago, bottom row centre, a farmers field we found in France around 1976. Oh how I wish we could still find fields like that now . . . . . . . I have mentioned it before probably at the time that I posted that photograph. Sat in a field on another farm were three abandoned Jeeps, when we walked over to look at them one of them was a rare model four wheel steer example, again how I wish we had bought it off the farmer back then . . . . . .

 

Lewis.

 

.

.

Young enough to care and enjoy militaria - Old enough to remember as surplus

 

" Life's too short for reproductions "

 

 

Life is like a tank of gas, the closer you get to a quarter tank, the faster it goes 

 

.

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

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Hi Wes, thanks for the link, I took a quick look and then had to laugh when I spotted one of my photographs that I had posted here on this forum a few years ago, bottom row centre, a farmers field we found in France around 1976. Oh how I wish we could still find fields like that now . . . . . . . I have mentioned it before probably at the time that I posted that photograph. Sat in a field on another farm were three abandoned Jeeps, when we walked over to look at them one of them was a rare model four wheel steer example, again how I wish we had bought it off the farmer back then . . . . . .

 

Lewis.

 

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Lewis, finding your photograph on there is very amusing considering he has warnings all over his site requesting people ask permission before using his photos and material.

 

I have to shake my head at all of the missed opportunities over the years. Either you don't have the knowledge to know what you're looking at or lack the money to buy when you do know, oh well hindsight is 20/20. Wes

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  • 2 months later...

The Maine family has expanded ^_^

 

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Rene

 

 

Never give in - never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense.

 

Churchill

 

Keep buggering on.

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  • 2 months later...

My brothers, sister and I were sifting through the "old homestead" and came across a pair of my grandparents license plates from the war years. My brother got one and I got the other. I thought these were made from some sort of fiber board but I like the soybean story better!

Kim

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A member of this fine site since December 16, 2006....Member # 60

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