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Model 1910 haversack discussion. Please add...


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This one has been all over the place. Most of these look like late '30s-early '40s type ID stamps...looks like ol' "S-0465" wanted to make sure he could spot his Pouch if it came up missing :lol:

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Showing the redesigning of the shoulder harnesses into the type we're all familiar with, with removable box buckles and tipped straps.

Rougher shape than the other 2 Packs, but very solid nonetheless.

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New, improved Meatcan Pouch attachment, and this Haversack has the most clear maker stamp of the 3 Packs.

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The outside of the "Tail": at the top below the upper strap is a handwritten "Corp. J.A. O'Day" (Marine Corps?) over a stenciled "HDQ..." followed by more figures I can't quite make out. The "U.S." is almost completely faded out.

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The inside of the Pack Carrier has an interesting stamping:

 

3

OHIO

HDQRS

30

 

It can't be said enough: if this stuff could talk...

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'Flage,

 

Excellent examples nonetheless. Seems to me that all first pattern 'sacks are marked in some way. I am yet to see one that is not.

Thanks for posting these early types...

TR

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Here is an odd haversack.

 

As I had mentioned at the beginning of this post, I do like those packs that are put together with mismatched pieces. This is the first of a few I will be posting.

Clearly one shoulder strap is of a different color that the rest of them.

 

This pack is in excellent condition with the exception of one strap being quite frayed.

Got this sack pretty cheap because of it I suppose, but once you rethread the strap, it becomes less than noticeable.

 

What makes this pack odd is the next image...

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First of all, this haversack is completely unmarked. Can't be worn away as the sack is in great shape. Also, the piping here is brown and quire narrow.

 

And, is it me, or does the flap seem smaller than usual? If anyone has any thoughts on this haversack I'd be glad to hear them...

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US Victory Museum

I saw this the day it originally was posted; however, constraints on my time did not permit me to follow up until now.

 

I have been accumulating both the 1st pattern 1910 haversacks, which were produced through 1914, as well as the

early pea green 1915 RIA 2nd pattern 1910 haversacks. I have a few modern torso-only mannequins which are not

suitable for displaying the smaller sized clothing from this era; therefore, I am unable to currently display these articles

with the accompanying accouterments as USMFTrenchRat has. I have all the rimless and rimmed 1910 cartridge

belts; early square tab flat buckle shovel carriers, axe carriers, and a pick carrier; P1904 blankets; and clothing, etc.

 

I placed these items on a blanket on the floor near a window so as to be illuminated with indirect sunlight. They were

photographed a few days ago, and I was able to get around to off loading from the camera to the computer, and as

I have just now had the opportunity to look at the photos I am aghast at how poor they have turned out. These pictures

are all crap, as all the color is washed out. I don't know if this is a fault of a camera setting, a lack of flash (which wasn't

used), or just that the indirect lighting was still too bright. In any event, you're going to have to use your immagination

to see these items as the green color they really are. These are vibrant olive drab colored without fading.

 

There are four 1st pattern 1910 haversacks (complete), and three 2nd pattern 1910 haversacks (1915 dated). All are

produced by RIA (Rock Island Arsenal)

 

Pack #1:

Early shovel carrier w/ metal tube for hardware. Stained early rimless eagle snap canteen carrier (late canteen).

P1903/07 cartridge belt. 1st aid pouch not visible.

post-1529-0-08905200-1429243424.jpg

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Khaki Pack Carrier with green web along edges & green straps.

 

Unit MG marking is to WWI era continued usage.

post-1529-0-52175800-1429243974.jpg

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2nd Pattern 1910 haversack (RIA 1915 dated)

Use your imagination - this pack is a vibrant green color.

post-1529-0-88252800-1429244066.jpg

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Accouterments to be used with the prior displayed packs. These are early pattern olive drab items

that have square tabs and flat buckles. Several have the metal tube that the hooks pass through,

thus dating them to around 1912.

post-1529-0-29411200-1429244372.jpg

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U.S.V.M., that is a heavy-duty collection of M1910 web gear...my compliments!! :excl:

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I saw this the day it originally was posted; however, constraints on my time did not permit me to follow up until now.

 

I have been accumulating both the 1st pattern 1910 haversacks, which were produced through 1914, as well as the

early pea green 1915 RIA 2nd pattern 1910 haversacks. I have a few modern torso-only mannequins which are not

suitable for displaying the smaller sized clothing from this era; therefore, I am unable to currently display these articles

with the accompanying accouterments as USMFTrenchRat has. I have all the rimless and rimmed 1910 cartridge

belts; early square tab flat buckle shovel carriers, axe carriers, and a pick carrier; P1904 blankets; and clothing, etc.

 

I placed these items on a blanket on the floor near a window so as to be illuminated with indirect sunlight. They were

photographed a few days ago, and I was able to get around to off loading from the camera to the computer, and as

I have just now had the opportunity to look at the photos I am aghast at how poor they have turned out. These pictures

are all crap, as all the color is washed out. I don't know if this is a fault of a camera setting, a lack of flash (which wasn't

used), or just that the indirect lighting was still too bright. In any event, you're going to have to use your immagination

to see these items as the green color they really are. These are vibrant olive drab colored without fading.

 

There are four 1st pattern 1910 haversacks (complete), and three 2nd pattern 1910 haversacks (1915 dated). All are

produced by RIA (Rock Island Arsenal)

 

Pack #1:

Early shovel carrier w/ metal tube for hardware. Stained early rimless eagle snap canteen carrier (late canteen).

P1903/07 cartridge belt. 1st aid pouch not visible.

 

Vic,

 

Nice packs all around. And thanks for displaying the tool carriers - an added bonus...

I have only come across one 1915 grean pack that had any signs of fading. Most seem to keep their color pretty well IMO.

I need to find a few more early second pattern packs.

 

TR

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Hey, guys:

 

I dug up a few photos that have been posted here on the forum in the past. These show a US Naval landing force

at Veracruz, Mexico (1914) with their 1st pat. 1910 haversacks.

 

TrenchRat: You may wish to acquire a set of working blues

and mix-up your display with a sailor wearing early gear.

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