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Model 1910 haversack discussion. Please add...


TrenchRat
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Good day all,

 

I thought it might be interesting to start a thread featuring the two models of the M1910 haversack (1910 thru 1918). I am not going to go into the history of this rather archaic piece of 1910 web gear; the black sheep of the 1910 accoutrement family, as most of you reading this are fully aware of its history. This post, rather, is a look at the haversacks I have in my collection, especially noting the various colors and odd mix of parts used in the manufacture of these bags. I typically go out of my way to find these odd mix and match 'sacks as it is a bit of a fascination with me.

 

I urge forum members to add to this post with images of their more interesting ‘sacks, because I’d love to see them. These are, after all, one of my favorite pieces of web gear.

 

I’ll start by posting images of a 1912-dated first pattern 1910 haversack.

The first pattern haversack suspenders feature a wider upper "shoulder strap" that was made of canvas with a taped edge, tipped off with the typical all web lower strap going thru the suspension hooks attaching to the pack body. An all web strap stitched to the shoulder strap goes thru a simple hook to attach to the belt.

As you can see, all parts are the same shade of olive drab...

 

 

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Also particular to this first pattern haversack is the rounded bottom of the meat can pouch (the earliest version of this early pouch was closed with an eagle snap fastener as opposed to the common metal “button” seen here on this pouch).

 

This display also includes the first type of entrenching tool without reinforcement on the back side of the shovel. You will also note the E-tool cover is in the exact shade of olive drab as the sack itself.

 

Here also is the brass belt hook...

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Here is a later 1916-dated first pattern haversack.

This pack features the same construction as the 1912 sack, but note the new shade of green to the suspenders. At this time a new color was in use; Pea Green (of the 1914-1917 period), but there are at least three different shades of green to this pack. This is not an oddball, as I have two of these later first pattern packs and they are identical. The shoulder straps, web and canvas, are essentially the same color, the variation likely due to the material. The canvas is edged with olive drab tape. The pack body is an entirely different shade...

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Again, particular to this first pattern haversack is the rounded bottom of the meat can pouch.

 

The color of the body is more green than the shoulder straps which appear to me as more of an "apple green" as opposed to a "middle green" of the body itself (this is noticeable in the close up of the buckle).

 

This display also includes the later type of entrenching tool this time with reinforcement on the back side of the shovel. You will also note the E-tool cover is in the early type featuring the leather strap.

 

Here also is the brass spring clip and buckle. Note the "spring" of the clip faces inwards as opposed to the next pattern. Also the buckle is not detachable as in the later version...

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Here is an early version of the second pattern 1910 haversack.

Interestingly, this pack, although a second pattern example, is dated 1915; earlier than the previous 1916-dated first pattern 'sack.

 

The second pattern haversack is much simpler, now featuring all web suspenders and spring hooks all around. Also all buckles are now detachable.

 

The 10-pocket cartridge belt and 1907 haversack seen here are a good example of the shade of pea green and the webbing is about a perfect color match, except for the upper portion of the suspender which is a shade I have not yet seen before; it is neither pea green nor olive drab...

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So now, particular to this second pattern haversack is the familiar squared bottom of the meat can pouch. Sadly, this pouch has lost the metal button and was replaced with some odd garment button at some point in the last century.

 

The color of the body is an exact match to the shoulder straps (this is noticeable in the close up of the buckle) and to the cartridge belt and 1907 haversack. The canteen cover is also a decent color match as well. Of note is that all the taping on this particular second pattern haversack body, 1907 haversack and canteen cover remain olive drab (as they did throughout first pattern haversack manufacture).

 

I would presume that this is the true pea green shade seen throughout this period.

In 1917 the predominant color of all web gear was the all too familiar khaki. However, other later-dated second pattern sacks I will be adding will feature olive drab taping and pea green bodies.

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Texas36th,

 

Thanks for the compliment, I appreciate that...

I will soon be in the same boat as you are...starting September...then another kid 2 years after that..!

I presume to go stagnant then...

 

TR

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Outstanding displays and examples, T.R.!

My stuff is pretty sporadic; a full display of M1910 web would require Eagle-snap Belts and Pouches like you've got, but I've never been able to go past my enjoyment of Lift-the-Dot goods.

 

A few '10s here- interesting to me that all the early examples of these particular Packs I've seen so far are made of darker green canvas. The rig at far left is a 1917-made item in the typical O.D. #3 shade.

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The first one of these I ever found was in a pile of web gear I picked up for various purposes many years ago- didn't know what to make of the "weird" shoulder harnesses. It was in terrible shape (would've posted a pic, but it's buried somewhere in the pile), dry rot and all. Finally found one in very nice shape, shown below. The Carrier was secured at a later date...

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It's been suggested that this stamp is "Field Music". Can't find any makers' stamps anywhere for some reason.

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These M1910 Pack Carriers are some of the toughest pieces of canvas to find...even harder than the Packs themselves.

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Flage,

 

Beautiful examples! These look like they were made yesterday. Just what I wanted to see here. I am yet to find a first pattern carrier, tho.

 

I have more to show in the next few days...

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T.R., thanks for the compliments- however, I think mine are in about equal condition with yours, which isn't bad by any means, but finding these in mint (or even near-mint) shape is one heckuva big job. And like you said, this is especially so with the Pack Carriers in any condition. Seems like somebody here on the Forum landed one that was almost new a while back, if I remember right. They had to pay a princely sum, but if you want to build a fine collection of rare stuff, ya gotta be prepared to put out if you have to...and if you can afford it...and most importantly, if it's OK with the wife B)

 

Here's one which has seen more use than the rig above; I think I picked this one up from Jeff Shrader, along with one of the intermediate models with the square Meatcan Pouch. Looks like it saw service with an Artillery unit (the Meatcan Pouch, anyway), and the Carrier is stamped to a Rifle Company. In other words, it's been around.

 

 

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The securing cord that came with the Haversack. Don't know if it's the original, but it does look old.

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This Carrier has "been there", to the point that somebody actually took the trouble to retouch the factory's "U.S." stamp. Don't see that done too often at all :blink: We used to do this sometimes with the surplus stuff we played "War" with, only it wasn't as nice a job as this.

Sadly, it is missing the lower D-rings.

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The Rifle Company stamp was applied over a not-quite-scrubbed-off "Q.M.C.".

Also, it appears to be a "77" under the property disc.

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Close-up of the disc; I can't bring myself to remove the disc to check the full number beneath it- to much of a risk, IMHO:

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