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rayg

My mannequin displays

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Here's the sling I bought just before the rifle. I couldn't pass it up for only $50. It's an early first pattern claw buckle sling for the 1873 Trapdoor, Krag and for the Lee Navy. It's about 1/8" narrower, and the buckle is a bit smaller and with longer and narrower fingers then the later slings. It has the Government inspectors initials stamped on it.

Generally you buy the rifle before any of the accouterments but not in this case. The magazine belt and sling came first. Ray

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I’d S.A.W. HAVERSACK, MESS KIT, & WALLET.

The haversack on the SAW figure is probably the most extensive I'd haversack and mess kit in existence.

Here are the contents of the 1878 haversack.

It contains an 1874 3rd pattern meat can, utensils, wallet, and an abdomen bandage. Written in black ink on the front flap of the haversack and in red ink under the flap, is "F. Chase Crider, Hospital Steward, 2nd Div., 1st Corp". Lightly scratched in the metal of the meat can on one side is his name, unit, date ("May 14, 1898") and on the other side, his name, unit, 1898, and the names of a number of camps he apparently was stationed at. The fork has his initials scratched in the handle. Both the fork and knife are the 1874 pattern with black painted handles and stamped US and are in the leather sheaths the spoon has his name, date ("Aug 98"), and "Huntington W", scratched in the bowl. Also in the haversack is his brown leather wrap around wallet. On one of the inside flaps of the wallet in red and black ink, are two hand drawn crossed flags, one American and the other a Cuban. Porto Rico, or Philippians flag. At the top of the flags are written 29th USVI and the dates 8-99, 4-98, 2-99. Along the bottom are the initials H.S. (Hospital steward) and what appears to be "10th W. Va.". On the other flap is his name "Floyd C. Crider and Huntington W. Va. 1896, Hosp Stewd. 29th USV, Ft Mc Pherson, La.". There are also other dates and numbers. Archives records list him in three battle engagements in the Philippians, (Montalbon Luzon, Palanog Masbate, & Caraman Samar) as well as several expeditions. A well identified haversack and contents and all are in Excl Plus condt..

 

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The haversack in on the 1898 mannequin on the left.

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Great details on the Haversack!!!! Thanks for posting these incredible close ups!

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Ray, your collection is amazing and inspirational. I'm particularly interested in your Civil War displays, and I love forage caps. What were prices like on uniforms and caps in 1970? I have one commercial style forage cap on my mannequin, and I'd love to have an EM bummer cap but the prices are prohibitive these days, if you can even find one.

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Hardtack, the prices on CW items kept jumping up for a number of years but spiked around 5-10 years and then fell considerably or stayed about the same since then without too much increase because of the flat economy and another reason was that the prices were so high for CW stuff that collectors moved into other lesser expensive fields like WWII. Eventually I predict they will start going up again because as the prices for the other period collectables will start to escalate up as the items become scarcer. Look what a good WWII helmet with a Hawley helmet sells for now compared to 10 years ago.

At current shows I have seen original plain forage caps in decent condition for sale recently for around $2,500 to $3,000. Of course unit or I'd ones go higher. This is basically the same price they were bringing 10 years ago. In 1970 the price for an average cap was about $300, muskets $125, Shell jackets, $200 etc. All military stuff, no matter what period, is highly collectable and a good investment.

You have a nice start in collecting CW items. There is a lot of interesting history in the CW period. Ray


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A few years ago I was offered, but passed on buying a sling that the seller thought might be a Winchester 1895 musket sling. But I wasn't sure if that's what it was, mainly because it did not have the taper on the button end so it would fit through the quick detachable narrow swivel used on the model 95 Winchesters like the sling I have on my Winchester Navy Lee. The buckle looked the same but it had a 1897 pattent date on it whereas my WLN sling had no patent date. But then the book Allied Rifle Contracts in America came out showing a Winchester model 95 sling that was used on the Russia contract and it was the same type sling with out the taper. Apparently the sling on my Win Navy was a early. pre-patent dated sling.

But by then I had lost the guys contact information so I couldn't get back to him to buy the sling. I kept thinking about that sling and kicking myself through the years for not buying it as they are really scarce slings and I can't recall ever seeing one on a rifle with the exception of the one on my Win Lee rifle and my attention was starting to be drawn toward buying a Win 95 musket.

 

Fast forward, I had sold a couple of Japanese rifles but kept the slings figuring I might need them in the future for another rifle I might buy. But then I decided I would sell one as finances started to suffer, so I advertised one of them for sale.

Wouldn't you know, the guy with the 95 sling I had passed on, emailed me out of the blue, and asked if I wanted to trade the Japanese sling I had for sale for the 95 sling. Not only that, but the price he had wanted for the 95 sling was way higher then price I wanted for the Japanese sling. A Win, Win.

So here's the sling. Now I will need the q-detachable swivel. Too bad but when I had bought the Winchester Lee Navy rifle it had a QD swivel on it but when I bought the sling for it, it came w/ a QD swivel on it so I sold the extra one which I now regret doing. Well here's another case of buying the accouterments before the rifle like I did for the Remington Navy rifle. Ray

 

PS: the sling w/out the taper still fits through the Q-detachable swivel. Also shown is the sling I have on the Win Lee Navy rifle

 

PS: the sling w/out the taper still fits through the Q-detachable swivel. Also shown is the sling I have on the Win Lee Navy rifle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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There was another reason besides the non tapered end on the sling that made me unsure it was a Win 95 sling at the time. And that was the difference between the buckle stitching on that sling and my Win Lee Navy sling. The buckle on the sling on my WL rifle is machine sewn and has a Win star proof on it but the above sling I first passed on, and now have, is hand sewn. However since I got this one I saw other Win 95 sling like it with the hand stitching that a fellow collector found on a Krag rifle.
My thinking now is, this difference may be the result of the slings for the 300,000 Russian rifles being farmed out by Winchester instead of not being made in house. Probably because of the large Russian contract, which surpasses the total of all the other type 95's made by Winchester to date, so they probably had to concentrate on just making the rifles. Ray


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Well we live and learn, at least I do. I almost made a real bad mistake. For years I heard and read in books that the general accepted serial number range for a 1943 dated M1A1's has been within the serial block only up to 9,999.99. Now however this has been proved to be misinformation/wrong and M1A1 carbine manufacture is now confirmed as including 1943 made carbines numbered into the next block of serial numbers ranging from 2,712520 to 2,995100.

The carbine I have is # 2,921478 with a barrel date of 10/43 and thinking it was not correct for a M1A1, I took the stock off of it and put it on one of my other correct numbered carbines as it was a better stock then the one that was on that one.

Well as I found out I almost ruined a real combat history carbine by removing that stock. Needless to say, I put it back on now that I know the carbine does fall in the M1A1 manufactured block of numbers.

The carbine # 2921478, is a real combat vet, having three deep notches hand cut into the bottom rear of the hand grip which were apparently cut to signify three kills. The notches appear original to the period. Another indication that the carbine has seen action is that all the metal on the sling has OD paint dabbed on them to prevent any reflection/shine. Ray

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The best part is when I bought the carbine years ago. Both the seller and I thought, due to the information at the time, that the serial number was out M1A1 range and that it was a put together and not a legit M1A1 carbine and the lower price I paid for it, reflected those thoughts, Ray


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Picked this Griswold rifle case last weekend at a show. It's in mint condition but the hook has been removed. Thought it was neat though being still with the box. Ray

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I just had to post this.

Again some times it's the little things that make you happy in this hobby. In this case, it's the elusive, (hard to find), 5 hole paratrooper chin cup that has just been found. They are next to impossible to find on the loose and I've been after one of these for years for my M1C helmet that's on the paratrooper manikin. His helmet has the 4 hole cup one which wasn't exactly correct as the original M2 and M1C helmets had the 5 hole ones. It's all correct and original, Ray

 

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Talk about members helping members--regardless of how long we've been collecting. When you referenced five holes in the chin cup of the M-2 helmet, I became curious. I have an absolutely MINT M-2 so had to take a look. Sure enough, FIVE holes. Thank you very much for this tid bit of information. Thank you very much for your help! Jack Angolia


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