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Nice Image of a female worker in an aircraft plant


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I love these pictures, wish I could find some like this for my Air Corps collection. Your right, I love how women looked back then, very feminine. That was true beauty. ;)

Brandon Sivek "God Bless Texas, and these United States"

 

 

 

 

 

In loving memory: Great Cousin 2nd Lt. Louis E. Machala, B-17 Pilot

2nd Air Force, 331st BG, 461st BS

Killed near Glenrock, WY on Feb. 25, 1943 during night time practice bombing

ALWAYS LOOKING FOR WW2 ARMY AIR FORCE FLIGHT GEAR

 

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PROUD MEMBER OF THE COMMEMORATIVE AIR FORCE

PROUD MEMBER OF THE FELLOW WINGNUT ASSOCIATION,

WINGNUTS OF THE WORLD UNITE!

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I love these pictures, wish I could find some like this for my Air Corps collection. Your right, I love how women looked back then, very feminine. That was true beauty. ;)

 

The "feminine" look in these photos is no accident.

 

If I recall correctly, a number of these were taken as part of "war information" campaign to convince Americans that it was okay for their wives and daughters to work in defense plants.

 

This may not seem like a big deal today, but the USA in 1940 was still ruled by traditional values that said a woman's place was in the home. There was a lot of social resistance to the idea of women working jobs traditionally held by men, especially in factories and shipyards.

 

If you want to get an idea of the attitudes and changes of the times, watch the movie Since You Went Away.

 

"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Since_You_Went_Away".

 

The movie is a bit sentimental and propagandistic as well. But it does give you a flavor for how people looked at the subject of women workers, as well as other accomadations that had to be made during the war years.

 

Something else you may want to look at is David Brinkley's "Washington Goes to War". With a really wicked wit, the NBC veteran describes the trials and tribulations of the office girls that boarded trains all over the country to come fill the government's wartime bureaucracy.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Washington-Goes-War-...1747&sr=8-1

 

Interstingly, I believe there was less resistance to women filling men's roles in farming and agriculture. This is probably because women living on farms always participated in the work in one way or another. At age 14 my Mom was driving stripped down flatbed trucks through the orchards picking up bushels of picked apples. And a good number of those apples were picked by German POW's on loan from the compound at nearby Ft. Niagara.

 

There are other, less staged photos from the time showing women doing some of the dirtiest jobs you can imagine. (Think steelmills and coal power plants.) These look a lot less feminine, but it all contributed to the war effort.

 

(Added note: for as much problem as the US Government had in recruiting women workers for industry, the Germans had an even worse time not only due to their traditional values but also to Nazi propaganda that preached women belonged at home raising the kids and cooking supper.)

Gil Burket
Omaha, NE
Specializing in Fakes and Reproductions
of the Vietnam War

burkcats@hotmail.com

 

"One is easily fooled by that which one loves."

 

Moliere: Tartuffe

 

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  • 2 months later...

Splendid photos!

 

Thanks for sharing

 

yannick

In memory of S/Sgt Sherwood H. Hallman (PA) F co, 175th Rgt, 29th division, BSM, PH w/olc (wounded in action june 8th in Normandy), MEDAL OF HONOR for action at Ilioc farm, Plouzané Sept 11 1944, KIA near Fort Keranroux, Brest Sept 14 1944. His son Sherwood Hallman II wearing the Medal. All my love to my adoptive family in Pennsylvania USA and to all my veteran friends.
You're the best!
29 LET'S GO!



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Awesome shots!

 

-Ski

In Memory Of......
Pte Harold Griffiths, 1805, 1/6th Manchester Regt, KIA June 4th, 1915 in Gallipoli
Cpl Isaac Judges, 40494, 6th East Yorkshire Regt, KIA October 3rd, 1917 in Ypres
May they rest in peace.....

MSgt - USAF Retired

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I was debating whether to post these colour photos under the Women's section of the forums; however, since you

started this topic on the Home Front & War Effort, I'll post 'em here.

 

31 Pictures to follow ( Same source, by-the-way. )

 

Here is a patch like the woman is wearing in posts 3-6 or so.

 

Patrick

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Terrific pictures! Really illustrates the WW2 "Rosie the Riveters" in a beautiful way! Thanks for posting!

Bobgee

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"I have only two men out of my company and 20 out of some other company. We need support, but it is almost suicide to try to get it here as we are swept by machine gun fire and constant barrage is on us. I have no one on my left and only a few on my right. I will hold." (Message sent by 1st Lt. Clifton B. Cates. USMC, 96th Co., Soissons, 19 July 1918 - later 19th Commandant of the Marine Corps 1948-1952)

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