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Salvage Sailor's USN Collection - "it just followed me home"


Salvage Sailor

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Salvage Sailor

In the USN, you could be trained in the service schools, primarily "A" schools, to become 'rated' and then go to the fleet, or you could go to the fleet out of boot camp the then 'strike' for a rate by doing independent study and the corespondence course.

 

This is the corespondence course for a QM striker (also used by a rated QMSN to advance to QM3)

 

To advance a sailor needed four (4) things.

 

1. a good evaluation scored from 1.0 to 4.0 with a recommendation for advancement.

 

2. Time in rate

 

3. Time in service

 

4. A passing grade on the advancement test in your rate

 

Corespondence courses were available in all USN rates as well as other disciplines (Mathematics, blueprint reading & Sketching, fluid mechanics, etc) that you could take for self study and also to combat boredom on long sea tours.

016_Manual_QM_3___2.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

This is an unmarked test package. You would be time tested by a training PO or Officer, who would then seal it and send it off to NAVTRA for scoring.

017_Manual_QM_3___2.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

Getting back to weather observations & those instruments....

 

This is what the Hydrographic Office would do with the data.

 

World Atlas 1944

019_Manuals_sea_surface.jpg

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Salvage Sailor

The charts (all oceans were included world wide)

021_Manuals_sea_surface.jpg

022_Manuals_sea_surface.jpg

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Salvage ships were extremely versatile and used for many other missions including Oceanographic, Surveying, the Atomic Tests, Arctic Operations (DewLine etc), Weapons Testing (target towing and recovery of targets), Submersible testing, and lots of (can't say what) classified operations & test beds.

 

These are Oceanographic references

023_Manuals_ocean.jpg

024_Manuals_ocean.jpg

025_Manuals_ocean.jpg

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Scientific & Submersible

026_Manuals_ocean.jpg

027_Manuals_ocean.jpg

028_Manuals_ocean.jpg

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Navigation Manuals for Seamanship (Bowditch 1962 & 1977), & Celestial Navigation

029_Manuals_Nav.jpg

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Compass Adjustment & Dead Reckoning (Azimuth correction tables for Celestial & Sun Fixes)

030_Manuals_Nav.jpg

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And then there was our primary mission - Marine Salvage

 

The Pearl Harbor study released in 1968 by VADM Homer Wallin

 

There are two giants of USN Salvage, Edward Ellsberg who raised sunken subs between the wars, invented much of the diving gear, anchors & techniques on the spot, and in WWII was the Atlantic Salvage Forces commander in Africa, the Med, and the ETO (including the Normandy invasion and Mulberry etc deployment)

 

The other man was Homer Wallin, the Salvor of Pearl Harbor and the Pacific Salvage Forces commander.

032_Manuals_Salvage.jpg

033_Manuals_Salvage.jpg

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From their substantial work came these: The Salvage & Towing manuals used in the Vietnam War, and the clearing of Haipong Harbor & the Suez Canal after the 1973 Yom Kippur War.

031_Manuals_Salvage.jpg

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These are USN surface ship alarms for General Quarter, Chemical Attack & the Collision Alarm. They were salvaged from a WWII era ship that was being scrapped.

 

These alarms would be mounted in sets in several locations - on the bridge, after conn, port & starboard quarterdecks and possibly down in main control.

Alarms_01.jpg

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The GQ alarm is on my WWII era salvage ships & cold war/Vietnam era destroyers was the familar Hollywood movie klaxon BONG! BONG! BONG! which immediately got your blood running and your feet and elbows pumping.

 

When you heard this alarm, you would race to your GQ station as assigned on the Watch, Quarter & Station Bill (I'll show this board later). You would go UP and FORWARD to PORT, or DOWN & AFT to STARBOARD to avoid a 'Chinese Fire Drill' or the more familiar Cluster....you know the rest (hey, I'm an old guy, I don't have to be PC).

 

The green alarm is the Chemical Attack alarm - on our ships, this was a constant loud tone. That meant drop what you're doing, get your gas mask on & either get off the decks or stay inside the compartments. If you were out on deck, oh well! This was also known as the NBC Alarm -Nuclear Biological Chemical or No Body Cares so Kiss your A.. Goodbye Alarm.

 

The yellow alarm is the Collision Alarm which in the Salvage business one was bound to hear for real sooner or later, usually moments after you were grounded on a reef or in the mud. This alarm was a low to high pitched tone, somewhat like an air raid alarm but it would stop at the high end and go back to the low to high peal.

 

The numbering plates are painted over multiple times so I can't see the info, but also if you look closely at the green & yellow alarms, you'll notice that they've been swapped out. There is yellow under the green & green under the yellow.

Alarms_02.jpg

Alarms_03.jpg

Alarms_04.jpg

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Going back to the Azimuth Circle I posted previously, here's a photo from our NAFTS website

 

USS Apache ATF 67 QM1 Jones and LT Nahabedian Taking a Sun Line. (Photo Contributed By John Nahabedian)

014_Inst.jpg

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Battle lanterns were hung all over USN ships in passageways, work spaces, berthing spaces, mess decks, and also in the damage control lockers. The older WWI & WWII models were grey, but the later Korean to present era battle lanterns were yellow.

 

These lanterns were salvaged from another target being towed out to sea.

 

Battle Lanterns are basically the same but come in two (2) types - hardwired and portable. They are mounted to bulkheads or overheads with either a vertical or horizontal twist bracket.

Lanterns_01.jpg

Lanterns_02.jpg

Lanterns_03.jpg

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This is the portable lantern. It has a toggle switch and works with the old Ray-O-Vac dry cell batteries.

Lanterns_04.jpg

Lanterns_05.jpg

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and this is the hard wired version. It would go on if the ship 'dropped the load' or by using the push button switch on the top. I'm showing this lantern upside down, when mounted on the bulkhead or overhead, the wire would be on the side or bottom, and the US faceplate up.

Lanterns_06.jpg

Lanterns_07.jpg

Lanterns_08.jpg

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Both of these lantern are made by

 

The Roflan Company, Topsfield, Mass.

Lanterns_09.jpg

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  • 8 months later...
Salvage Sailor
Salvage Sailor

SERVRON 5 patch - Service Squadron Five - Our salvage group Homeported in Guam during the 1950's - 1960's, then relocated to Alpha Docks, Pearl Harbor, HI

 

This one is mounted on a green wardroom tablecloth

Servron_Five_Patch.jpg

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Great items, Craig.

I, also, collect USN unit plaques.

 

As I'm an ex-RD who converted to DP, the RD gear brought back many memories. I spent many an hour staring at an SPS-10...

 

What? No Watch Quarter & Station Bill in your collection? :)

 

Thanks for posting.

-dan

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I've got no business at all making any sort of a comment about anything Naval, so I'll make a comment anyway as a gesture of enthusiastic empathy.

 

These are really great stuff! bravo.gif

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Salvage Sailor
Great items, Craig.

I, also, collect USN unit plaques.

 

As I'm an ex-RD who converted to DP, the RD gear brought back many memories. I spent many an hour staring at an SPS-10...

 

What? No Watch Quarter & Station Bill in your collection? :)

 

Thanks for posting.

-dan

 

Dan,

 

Do you want the mid-watch so you can sleep in for morning quarters?

 

PS - I'll be posting more plaques soon thumbsup.gif

IMG_3649.JPG

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