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M1 Garand Web Sling


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With regard to said Mr Thompson, the words "deafening" and "silence" spring to mind!

 

 

Sabrejet :think:

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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Gentlemen:

 

I guess Mr. Thompson was not interested in other evidence and points of view on this interesting subject. He has not been seen in these parts in about 18 months.

 

I think the members here have pretty conclusively established the use of the web sling in the ETO as early as 1944. The evidence seems incontrovertible to me.

 

Regards,

Charlie

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Well to be honest he said, "...The GI web slings used during World War II on Garands saw virtually NO combat, ...The leather M1907 sling and variants thereof were the salient slings during World War II, and virtually the only ones used in combat. In about 45 years of looking, I have clearly identified precisely TWO photos which MAY show M1 Garands (or even '03's or other rifles in U.S. service, come to think of it!) anywhere near a combat zone showing web slings on the rifles..."

 

Placing his opinion that my sling was not original aside, he was suggesting that based on his photos that few rifles had a web slings in use, and so he believes that they weren't used in combat much if at all. I think the members of this forum found some more pictures, but the pictures look to me to be late 1944 or early 1945 so he is right that the predominant slings were leather M1907s for most of WW2. However, I think he is wrong that web slings were not used in WW2 combat much.

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When it comes to Garand books collectors generally turn to those by Scott Duff and Billie Pyle not Thompson's books. Pyle states in his book Ordnance Tools, Accessories & Apppendages of the M1 Rifle that the cotton web sling was adopted by the Ordnance Department in 1942. Duff gives the same date in his The M1 Garand: World War II.

 

Thompson's drive by whack at this topic speaks volumes about him.

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Looking for original photos and other items from the First World War US 77th Infantry Division.

Also interested in BAR and M1917A1 BMG related items.

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The first time web slings were fielded in large numbers, from what I've seen, was D-Day and as I have previously stated some units used them almost exclusively, the 502nd comes to mind. This makes Thompson's statement, for lack of a better expression, ridiculous. The only web M1 sling(that comes to mind) that saw little to no use was the version with the raised bar on the clamp and that we have a photograph of being used.

 

I will agree that the 1907 sling was by far the most common sling to see throughout the war but after mid '44 web slings are seen in large numbers on all fronts.

 

-Josh

Interested in China Marine Militaria.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hank was born and spent his younger years in the same town that my dad grew up - Larksville PA. Do you know what street he lived on there?

 

Can you contact me at kelbrit@hotmail.com

Under subject put Hank Z

 

Thanks

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  • 2 weeks later...

WWII photo of a Japanese American of the 100th BN. If you will look closely at the forward sling swivel you will see that he is using a canvas M1 Garand sling on his 1928 Thompson.

 

100thBN.jpg

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Looking for original photos and other items from the First World War US 77th Infantry Division.

Also interested in BAR and M1917A1 BMG related items.

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  • 3 weeks later...

hi , can you repost the picture of the web sling ??

is it khaki or olive drab ??/

happy

 

Hank was born and spent his younger years in the same town that my dad grew up - Larksville PA. Do you know what street he lived on there?
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Happy,

 

Check my post a few above yours. I reposted the picture via photobucket - I can't see it because work IT blocks photobucket, among others. Let me know if you can see it.

 

As to, is it khaki or OD? It is OD3, which is I believe commonly called khaki among collectors of WW2 USGI items. It is not dark olive green like OD7, though. But it isn't khaki as seen on a pair of pants from The Gap, either.

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hi paul , I will try today to take a picture of my sling , which may be a repro as it is Khaki, a lot lighter in color than the one you have picture, happy

Happy,

 

Check my post a few above yours. I reposted the picture via photobucket - I can't see it because work IT blocks photobucket, among others. Let me know if you can see it.

 

As to, is it khaki or OD? It is OD3, which is I believe commonly called khaki among collectors of WW2 USGI items. It is not dark olive green like OD7, though. But it isn't khaki as seen on a pair of pants from The Gap, either.

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  • 2 months later...

I have an original WW2 web sling and it came on my 03A3. It was rebuilt in '44 as the barrel is dated 3-44 and the sling is MRT marked and dated '44. The rifle has the original FJA cartouche on the stock as well as the SA rebuild stamp. My sling is olive drab , certainly not the mustard color.

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In a letter to the Ordnance Department, General Patton writes that the web sling should be the sling predominately issued since the leather sling was, "Too complicated for the average soldier to use effectively." or something to that nature.

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I have a series of Signal Corps photos 4x6" showing individuals of the 89th Inf. Div. in great detail taken the winter of 1944. Where the rifle is being carried in the photo, everyone has the web sling. Additionally, I have three WWII era M-1's, all of which have the period web slings. I would love to post, but don't know how. Jack Angolia

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  • 6 years later...

I just happened on this old topic. I add only as specific information the first documented use of M1 web slings I have seen is by the 16th Infantry regiment in Sicily (July-August, 1943). There are several photos (included several by Robert Capa taken around Troina) showing them in enough quantity that I think either the Big Red One received them in numbers after North Africa or they came with a new issue of rifles fresh from the States at the same time.

 

Here is a link at just one of those photos (in this case at Niscemi at mid-July, 1943) http://16thinfassn.org/?page_id=2878# (scroll down and open photo 6 of 23)

 

It's worth noting I haven't been able to find any other documented use by other units in Sicily (only M1907 slings are seen) and M1 web slings virtually disappear again in Italy till about mid-1944.

 

cheers

Kilroy

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Really great conversation indeed.

I add my 2cents to this conversation, I remember a ranger landed in Normandy during DDAy with a tommygun and leather sling mounted.

 

Bye

Giancarlo

Always looking for BLUE DRESS ARMY UNIFORMS (1936-1950)

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