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WWI Victory Medal question


MurfreesboroMemphis

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BigJohn#3RD

 

RC, Thank you for this information, it is very much appreciated. We do still have the certificate with the Pershing signature, so my guess is that he never submitted for the meritorious service purple heart (he was not wounded).

Thanks again, D. McNeill

 

 

I do not think that the individual had to give up any document to receive any award for Meritorious or Valor. They may have had to send in the document which would have been returned to them. More often than not they had a local American Legion, VFW or other veteran organization certify that the official had seen the original document for the appropriate award to be made. I know that many veterans mailed in their Discharge Document and received their Victory Medal with the appropriate number and type clasps.

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BigJohn#3RD

I note, from a previous post, that around 748,000 WW1 Victory medals were awarded for Stateside service.

Does this mean that ANY man enlisted and mobilised for service in the Army or Navy at this time was therefore entitled to a medal? Can anybody tell me exactly what the award criteria was for these men?

I am currently researching one Edward A Cordts who served 1898-1919 with (chronogically) 203rd NY Vols, 7th US Cavalry and 12th Cavalry; he qualified/was awarded the Spanish War Service, Cuban Occupation and Mexican Border Service medals. I post his WW1 service card below, and am trying to establish if he also qualified for a WW1 Victory medal too? Can anyone advise?

There must be many medal groups out there to men of this period, who also were entitled to a Victory too....

 

 

Any man or women, enlisted, officer, nurse, would have been authorized the VM if they had documentation to support their service.

 

The tricky part is determining what clasp or clasps were authorized, which clasps they were authorized. I have seen service members who were awarded clasps for battles they could not have been in due to their being in the hospital being treated for wounds or gas exposure during the time a specific campaign and most often seen men who were back from the hospital in other units but not at the front, in the rear with the gear in a support activity, not receive a clasp even though they were on the roles at the Division level.

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BigJohn#3RD

I note, from a previous post, that around 748,000 WW1 Victory medals were awarded for Stateside service.

Does this mean that ANY man enlisted and mobilised for service in the Army or Navy at this time was therefore entitled to a medal? Can anybody tell me exactly what the award criteria was for these men?

I am currently researching one Edward A Cordts who served 1898-1919 with (chronogically) 203rd NY Vols, 7th US Cavalry and 12th Cavalry; he qualified/was awarded the Spanish War Service, Cuban Occupation and Mexican Border Service medals. I post his WW1 service card below, and am trying to establish if he also qualified for a WW1 Victory medal too? Can anyone advise?

There must be many medal groups out there to men of this period, who also were entitled to a Victory too....

 

 

Any man or women, enlisted, officer, nurse, would have been authorized the VM if they had documentation to support their service.

 

The tricky part is determining what clasp or clasps were authorized, which clasps they were authorized. I have seen service members who were awarded clasps for battles they could not have been in due to their being in the hospital being treated for wounds or gas exposure during the time a specific campaign and most often seen men who were back from the hospital in other units but not at the front, in the rear with the gear in a support activity, not receive a clasp even though they were on the roles at the Division level.

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Yes it is a French made unofficial "battle" clasp (Saint Mihiel) adding it would never have been issued together with a service clasp (France). The French type of clasps were available at veterans and military shows over the years. I believe this owner wanted to display the area he served near, as his clasp, FRANCE might have been just to general for him. - See my book, WORLD WAR I, Victory Medals still being sold on Amazon.com (over 700 copies sold).

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Reply to Roystone

Posted 21 July 2016 - 03:58 AM

 

 

From my book.

 

Box Type-1 Victory Medal Assembled, Without Clasp - The box on the top in Illustration No. 5 came with a fully assembled medal with no clasp as shown. This medal was awarded to all who served in the United States Army, along with a small number of civilians working for the government between April 6, 1917 and November 11, 1918.

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joeddelozier

Any man or women, enlisted, officer, nurse, would have been authorized the VM if they had documentation to support their service.

 

The tricky part is determining what clasp or clasps were authorized, which clasps they were authorized. I have seen service members who were awarded clasps for battles they could not have been in due to their being in the hospital being treated for wounds or gas exposure during the time a specific campaign and most often seen men who were back from the hospital in other units but not at the front, in the rear with the gear in a support activity, not receive a clasp even though they were on the roles at the Division level.

 

Do you know if members of the Advanced Section of the S.O.S. qualified for the Defensive Sector clasp bar? I read somewhere the all members of the 1st Army and those serving in the A.E.F.'s "defensive regions" automatically qualified for the Defensive Sector, but I can't verify or pin down what that entails.

 

One of my ancestors was most likely at Liffol-le-Grand with the Advanced Section of the S.O.S. during the Lorraine campaigns.

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Hello If interested in my book try this site.

 

On this site you can preview some pages from the book and you will find 8 reviews.

 

 

http://www.amazon.com/World-War-I-Victory-Medals/dp/1497514177/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1419367753&sr=1-1-fkmr1&keywords=jim+michels+victory+medals

I have bought your book, and I have thoroughly enjoyed it. Thank you for writing an amazing reference book. I have utilized it many times and it has paid off.
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First of all Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Years to all members of this forum.

 

One of the questions that have often come up on this thread is how the veteran applied for the Victory Medal (VM),and Clasps based on his service. The short answer is that he presented documentation to a local authority to apply for it. Going through the Ancestry.com Pennsylvania World War Veterans Compensation Claims I have found numerous request for VM and the appropriate claps that the veteran was authorized. Besides the Compensation request most veterans had an AGO card just like the ones seen in the New York archives found on Ancestry for WWI Veterans.

 

Attached, is World War One Mario Acerro of Bethlehem Pa request for a Victory Medal. He has served with Co H 327 Inf 82nd Div during WWI; the card indicates that he applied for his medal at the Scranton Pennsylvania Recruiting Station. The station representative filled out the card with an X in the boxes next to the VM clasps on the left side of the document for the official combat clasps, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne his medal is authorized to have attached to the suspension ribbon. Below the combat clasps, typed in are locations and dates for which he was authorized to have a Defensive Sector Clasp (Toul 27/6-8/9, 1918) on the medal's suspension ribbon. On the right side of the request is the clasps issued and the authorization number that was filled out by the Depot granting the VM with Clasps.
A copy of this
I hope this fills in some of the questions out there.

 

 

 

post-5224-0-65612400-1514400196_thumb.jpg

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Here is my WW1 Victory Medal question. I am putting together a shadow box for My brother in laws father, He severed on BB20 USS Vermont, 1917-1919 she was basically a training ship until just at was end, She stayed in Norfolk for training seamen. In November 1918 she was transformed to a transport for returning personal of the AEF. There was one brief visit to S. America to return the body of a dignitary. Where he crossed the equator. So he made 4 trips to France and back. Would his victory medal be a plain medal, Transport clasp or Atlantic fleet clasp ?? Anybody got a clue? Lost on what too do. I guess any would do. His papers have nothing there. Thanks and Regards, David

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Plain Victory medal I guess. If the trips on the US Vermont to France and back were before November 11th, 1918 he was eligible to the clasps.

 

Regards

Herman

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In going through some of my grandfathers old service related paperwork, I came across this document that explains the method of receiving a Victory Medal near the little town in lived near in 1920. I thought some may find this interesting.


Kim

post-60-0-89453400-1545241305_thumb.jpg

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The short answer is three clasps, the St Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, and Defensive Sector clasps, are authorized for the 35th Division AEF.

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Would there be enough interest for a reprint of the book? Looking at Amazon- $132 makes me think there would be interest at this time. Thanks.

 

G2

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Sumserbrown
On 12/23/2014 at 6:37 PM, Johnnymac said:

1920's August, Army Navy magazine showing the earlier returns on the Victory read the listing from one to fourteen.

 

Jim

 

 

post-12923-0-02431600-1419356010.jpg

My greatest regret in my medal collecting life was not buying the 9-bar victory medal with award slip that I saw on Ebay about 15 years ago. I am even more upset now I ready that there were only 3 of them. I could have bought that for $1600 and it would have been a bargain...... aarrgghhh!

Rob

 

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mars&thunder

Why do you think there were only 3 of these? I believe there were approximately two hundred issued, almost exclusively to the men of the Reserve Mallet. My estimate is based on extrapolations from government stated partial issue totals and headcount data/service qualifications from the Reserve Mallet. Ten bar versions are rarer, perhaps 30 issued.

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Johnnymac
16 hours ago, mars&thunder said:

Why do you think there were only 3 of these? I believe there were approximately two hundred issued, almost exclusively to the men of the Reserve Mallet. My estimate is based on extrapolations from government stated partial issue totals and headcount data/service qualifications from the Reserve Mallet. Ten bar versions are rarer, perhaps 30 issued.

Good morning, 

There were many more of each of the different count of clasps from 1 to 14.  At the time I posted this: 1920's August, Army Navy magazine showing the "earlier returns" on the Victory read the listing from one to fourteen. The Key two words "earlier returns".  The final count on all has never been put to print as far as I know.  Example: General john J Pershing I wrote received the 14 clasp VM.  That was correct, but I come to find so did his office staff receive the same 14 clasp medal. How many were there? 

Thanks and I hope this helps you

Jim

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