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USN MK5 Signal Flare Pistol and accessories


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Good stuff, Craig, and appropriate for a Fourth of July Weekend.

 

Here is a pic of the other version of the Mark 5 Signal Pistol. This one was manufactured by Vulcan. It is identical to the Sedgley made pistols except for the maker markings. I have one of each in my collection. The Vulcan made guns seem to be much harder to find than the Sedgleys.

 

This pic was originally posted elsewhere on the Forum by a now-banned former member, but it illustrates the Vulcan Mark 5 pistol, the rig and the signal cartridges well.

 

Has anyone ever seen a period photo of the Navy Mark 5 Signal Pistol in use?

 

Regards,

Charlie Flick

 

 

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Good stuff, Craig, and appropriate for a Fourth of July Weekend.

 

Here is a pic of the other version of the Mark 5 Signal Pistol. This one was manufactured by Vulcan. It is identical to the Sedgley made pistols except for the maker markings. I have one of each in my collection. The Vulcan made guns seem to be much harder to find than the Sedgleys.

 

This pic was originally posted elsewhere on the Forum by a now-banned former member, but it illustrates the Vulcan Mark 5 pistol, the rig and the signal cartridges well.

 

Has anyone ever seen a period photo of the Navy Mark 5 Signal Pistol in use?

 

Regards,

Charlie Flick

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I used this same rig the entire time I was in the Navy ('72-'99). Never paid that much attention to the manufacturer of the pistol, so can't say which was more common. Always had the khaki colored belt and holster. They were carried by the boat signalman and gennerally hung on a hook by the door of the signal shack, or stuffed in an old ammo box.

 

The shells were always loaded in the belt in the same manner on every ship I went on, and was a Navy wide pratice. The red shells on the left (port), the green on the right (starboard) and the white in the back (white stern light). The "Projectile end" of the shells had specific ends on them for night identification, green-smooth, red-ridge and white-bump. However, sometimes with cold wet fingers it was hard to tell, which is why they were always loaded into the belt lops the same way.

 

The shells them selves have very little hang time. They are not paraschute stars or anything like that. More like Roman Candles, they just sort of pop and fly out and fall. And yes, on a couple of "Fourth of Julys" at sea we would pop a few flares (with permission of course).

 

Steve Hesson

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I'm wondering why the flare belt has 32 loops? Flares come in 10 round boxes or tins. Does the belt have 32 loops so that the colors could be seperated by an unused loop? 10 reds, space, 10 whites, space, then 10 greens?

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I'm wondering why the flare belt has 32 loops? Flares come in 10 round boxes or tins. Does the belt have 32 loops so that the colors could be seperated by an unused loop? 10 reds, space, 10 whites, space, then 10 greens?
I doubt there was ever that much thought given to the design of the belt. I would think they just put one continuious length of tape on the belt and sewed it down. I believe that the pratice of seperating the rounds as we did was devised after the belt was produced. Most likely, some one noticed that the flares were about the same size as a 12 guage shotgun shell and recommended a shotgun belt be used and they just started cranking them out that way.

 

Steve Hesson

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