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Don't forget the Rosie the Riveters?


vette
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My grandmother built some of the bomb casings in Pittsburgh. She worked her butt off and was very proud of her contribution to the war. They didn't sacrifice their lives but made our planes, ammunition, uniforms, weapons, field gear, ships. With out their help we would not been able to keep up with the demand for two wars. Today not much is made here in the USA but we need to be reminded of their long hours and I am sure their work. In memory of my grandma Williams Bill

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Civil service worker Grace Weaver paints American insignia onto repaired airplane wings at the Corpus Christi, Texas, naval air base. Weaver was formerly a schoolteacher with a brother working as an Army flight instructor.

 

 

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A camouflage class at New York University, where men and women make models from aerial photographs and devise a camouflage scheme for a defense plant.

 

 

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A female welder takes a moment to rest at the Richmond shipyard in California. The same Newsweek article noted that women could be found working "in the shipyards, lumber mills, steel mills, foundries ... Women engineers are working in the drafting rooms and women physicists and chemists in the great industrial laboratories."

 

 

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My grandmother worked for Clayton-Lambert during WW2 as a shell casing inspector. She was always proud of her effort during the war.

 

I am a modern militaria collector, but have this coverall displayed prominently in my "war room". One of the few WW2 pieces I have left in my collection, but this one is going to stay with me.

 

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Link: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/156272-rosie-the-riveter-coverall-owens-illinois/

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Thanks for posting your thoughts and pictures. All of the Rosie's have been over looked by many. My grandmother used to talk about how hard they worked knowing the soldiers that were risking and or sacrificing their lives and worked over time while their children stayed home or hired a baby sitter or family member.

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Mildred Webb learns to operate a cutting machine at the Assembly and Repair Department of the Corpus Christi, Texas, naval air base. After about eight weeks of training, she'll be eligible for a job.

 

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Women employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill in Turkey Pond, New Hampshire, taking a break. Dorothy De Greenia, far right, said she doesn't find the job hard after years of housework. Her son was deployed with the U.S. Army in Australia at the time of this photo.

 

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Mrs. Paul Titus, a 77-year-old air raid spotter in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, patrols her beat with a gun. "I can carry a gun any time they want me to," she said.

 

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