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Small WWI era US Air Service wings


rustywings
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The back reveals a variety of catches and markings. The findings include a Tiffany-style lever catch; a rotating 'C' catch; and drop-in rotating catch.

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The small WWI era Pilot wings weren't limited to just metal-made. Here's a two-inch wide bullion-made Air Service wing.

 

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Comparison shot of the two small bullion Pilot wings. Both are heavily padded. The second example is slightly smaller at 1 & 7/8 inches wide.

 

 

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WOW Russ those bullion are awesome. That is just the best. Would they be shirt , cap or sweetheart or all of the above.They are really nice. Thanks Mike

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Great thread! I haven't been on for a while and It is nice to see these smaller WW1 wings getting some love.

 

Do any of you have photos of these two-inch wings being worn (on caps, shirts, or even by "sweethearts")? Certainly by WW2, and on into the present, two-inch wings would have been for wear on shirts. Do we know when the WW2 era practice of shirt-sized wings started? The 20s? 30s? Could the later 2-inch wings be a continuation of something done earlier (if not officially sanctioned)? Your thoughts?

 

Chris

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Great thread! I haven't been on for a while and It is nice to see these smaller WW1 wings getting some love.

 

Do any of you have photos of these two-inch wings being worn (on caps, shirts, or even by "sweethearts")? Certainly by WW2, and on into the present, two-inch wings would have been for wear on shirts. Do we know when the WW2 era practice of shirt-sized wings started? The 20s? 30s? Could the later 2-inch wings be a continuation of something done earlier (if not officially sanctioned)? Your thoughts?

 

Chris

 

Nice to see you back Chris. Hope all is well.

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WOW Russ those bullion are awesome. That is just the best. Would they be shirt , cap or sweetheart or all of the above.They are really nice. Thanks Mike

 

Mike, until we reveal more concrete information, I think your "all of the above" answer is likely the best response. Thanks for your input.

 

 

Great thread! I haven't been on for a while and It is nice to see these smaller WW1 wings getting some love.

 

Do any of you have photos of these two-inch wings being worn (on caps, shirts, or even by "sweethearts")? Certainly by WW2, and on into the present, two-inch wings would have been for wear on shirts. Do we know when the WW2 era practice of shirt-sized wings started? The 20s? 30s? Could the later 2-inch wings be a continuation of something done earlier (if not officially sanctioned)? Your thoughts?

 

Chris

 

Chris, it's terrific to have you back with us! For those members not familiar with Chris, just review some of the old Forum archives and you'll see he's an avid wing and badge collector...and a very knowledgeable source on early U.S. aviation.

 

I hope our membership can help answer your questions regarding the early use of two inch wings. I have two WWI overseas officer's caps with nicely detailed small Pilot wings attached which I believe are original. But were they authorized?

 

Any period photographs of Pilots, or their sweethearts, wearing these small wings would certainly help. Please share your small wings, images and tidbits of information any of you may have.

 

Russ

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Here's a WWI era color-tint studio photograph of Lt. Robert T. Cronau wearing a small pair of wings which I estimate to be in the 2 & 1/4 to 2 & 1/2 inch size.

 

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Here are a couple of pictures showing smaller 'sweetheart' wings in wear. They both date to the postwar era.

 

The first one shows a few different type of 'smaller' aviation wings. I call this guy "The Drunk Captain"

 

The 2nd image soon to follow...

 

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Here are a couple of pictures showing smaller 'sweetheart' wings in wear. They both date to the postwar era.

 

The first one shows a few different type of 'smaller' aviation wings. I call this guy "The Drunk Captain"

 

The 2nd image soon to follow...

 

 

That really is quite the Officer's photograph! Even his "U.S." collar insignia is disconnected and precariously hanging there...

 

Terrific image. Thank you very much for sharing it with us.

 

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