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This thread is for photos of enemy aircraft that have been captured by US Forces and repainted either totally or in part with US Markings...

 

I'll start off with some Oscars. It's possible that some of these are actually the same aircraft, but each has its own peculiarities.

 

This first one is named 'Racoon Special'...

 

RacoonSpecial1.jpg

Project 914 Archives

 

 

Oscar001a.jpg

Project 914 Archives

 

 

CapturedOscar002a.jpg

Mike Butry collection via Project 914 Archives

 

 

123b.jpg

Project 914 Archives

 

 

Fade to Black...


Steve O. Reno

(formerly BlackWolf3945 here on USMF)

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...

HAWKSNESTSig1.jpg

Seeking Curtiss-Wright aircraft photos, especially the P-40, P-36, & O-52...

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Here's another couple shots of a captured Oscar... again, this may be the same aircraft shown in one or more of the photos above.

 

The emblem on the nose is that of the 84th Airdrome Squadron. Different versions of this emblem can also be seen on the aircraft in two of the photos above. Note the artwork on the wheel cover; it appears to be some variation of the Fifth Air Force insignia.

 

84ASOscar003b.jpg

Project 914 Archives

 

 

84ASOscar002b.jpg

Project 914 Archives

 

 

Fade to Black...


Steve O. Reno

(formerly BlackWolf3945 here on USMF)

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...

HAWKSNESTSig1.jpg

Seeking Curtiss-Wright aircraft photos, especially the P-40, P-36, & O-52...

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Okay, I know what some are gonna say when they see these next three photos...

 

"But... it's a Japanese plane! This is the US Militaria forum!!!"

 

Patience grasshoppers, and all will be revealed...

 

 

Koga001.jpg

ACME news photo in the holdings of the University of Alaska

 

 

Koga002.jpg

ACME news photo in the holdings of the University of Alaska

 

 

Koga003.jpg

Don Miller collection via Project 914 Archives

 

 

Fade to Black...


Steve O. Reno

(formerly BlackWolf3945 here on USMF)

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...

HAWKSNESTSig1.jpg

Seeking Curtiss-Wright aircraft photos, especially the P-40, P-36, & O-52...

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Here's the same Zeke shortly after being repaired and dolled up in US markings...

 

Koga004.jpg

NACA (NASA) photo via Project 914 Archives

 

 

Koga005.jpg

Don Miller collection via Project 914 Archives

 

 

Koga006.jpg

Don Miller collection via Project 914 Archives

 

 

This particular Zero, an A6M2 Model 21, has come to be known as 'Koga's Zero' after its pilot, Flight Petty Officer Tadayoshi Koga. It was the first Zero to fall into the hands of the Allies more or less intact, and was discovered by a patrolling PBY on the island of Akutan in the Aleutians in July of 1942.

 

On June 4th, 1942 the airplane had been damaged during a raid on Dutch Harbor; an oil line being severed. Koga knew he probably wouldn't make it back to his carrier, the Ryujo, so decided to make a forced landing on Akutan. The island had been designated as an emergency landing area by the Japs and there was a submarine stationed nearby to pick up downed aircrew.

 

Koga picked a grassy meadow in which to put the airplane down, and lowered his landing gear... a bad decision for which he paid the ultimate price. When the wheels settled onto that 'grassy meadow' he discovered too late that it wasn't as solid as he had thought. It was quite marshy and the wheels dug in, flipping the airplane over onto its back.

 

Koga's wingmen, like all IJN Zero pilots, were under orders to prevent a Zero from falling into enemy hands at all costs. They should have strafed the aircraft, but did not because they were not sure whether Koga had survived the landing or not. So they headed back to the Ryujo, undoubtedly hoping that Koga had survived and would destroy the aircraft himself.

 

Unfortunately for them, and the rest of Japan, Koga's neck had been broken when the airplane flipped over and he stayed there with his plane until a little over a month later when a USN PBY made what is arguably the single most important discovery during the war against Japan.

 

 

Fade to Black...


Steve O. Reno

(formerly BlackWolf3945 here on USMF)

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...

HAWKSNESTSig1.jpg

Seeking Curtiss-Wright aircraft photos, especially the P-40, P-36, & O-52...

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The following photos of Koga's Zero were taken in Dallas in September of 1944.

 

Koga007a.jpg

Image source: John Lane collection

 

 

Koga008a.jpg

Image source: John Lane collection

 

 

Koga009a.jpg

Image source: John Lane collection

 

 

Fade to Black...


Steve O. Reno

(formerly BlackWolf3945 here on USMF)

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...

HAWKSNESTSig1.jpg

Seeking Curtiss-Wright aircraft photos, especially the P-40, P-36, & O-52...

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great pictures! there is a myth behind that zero that it sparked the development for the F6F hellcat which in reality the hellcat was already far in to it's development stage when that zero was recovered. I believe by the time that zero was operational the hellcat was in production.

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Dallas in September 1944 is interesting, that must have been when it was being ferried from Anacostia NAS to North Island NAS. My father’s log book show that he flew this same airplane on 14 September 1944, 19 September, 14 October, 21 October, and 25 October 1944.

 

He once wrote:

 

“There was a time when I considered that Zero “my airplane” with only John Crommelin (on occasion) to say nay. After the Zero’s demise I was able to corral a few surviving pieces, such as:

 

• Left wing tip, the folding part complete with locking device, wiring, port running light

• Manifold pressure gauge – units in centimeters,  at sea level pressure, low reading –40, hi reading +25

• Airspeed gauge – units in knots. Non linear scale is stretched in the low speed range – excellent for landing approach

• Few pictures of the beauty in Hangar 40, North Island.

 

“I first saw this Zero as a pile of salvage at NAS San Diego – in the balloon barn. The A & R did a beautiful job of restoration. At that time, I was freshly back form Midway as a CV-5 survivor. I left for Pearl & SW Pac in Oct ’42 so couldn’t follow developments as it was being rebuilt. By the time I returned from SW Pac in July 1943, the Zero had been long gone to the east coast. As far as I can determine not much if any early testing was done on the west coast. It went to Tactical Air Intelligence Center (TAIC) and base at Anacostia. After F.M. Trapnell and a number of other worthies such as “Boogie” Hoffman tested, compared, & evaluated it, the Army put it through similar paces.

 

“From Aug 1943 to 4 Nov 1944 I was VF training officer staff ComFltAir West Coast and assistant to Jim Flatley through most of that time until he went to work for Marc Mitscher in TF-58. He was relieved by John Crommelin. While working for Flatley I learned that the Zero still at Anacostia was flyable but in a state of disuse. We got some pressure and got the machine ferried out to Hangar 40 North Island, our office and general hangout. The Zero was in dire need of attention and care and got it.

 

“All this took time and I’m not sure the plane could be flown before Jim went out to the Fast Carriers. My log shows what must have been one of the earliest flights in our custody – 14 Sep 1944. Several hops later my log show 21 Oct – “Flight with J.G. Crommelin – he in FM-2 – pretty even.” My last hop in this Zero was 25 Oct 44. On 4 Nov., because of the long reach of J. Thach, I was flying to Ulithi to go to work for him on J.S. McCain’s TF-38 staff. Sometime during my absence the Zero received strike damage because when I returned to Coronado for a few weeks in Feb 1945 the wreckage of the Koga Zero was piled up in Hangar 40.

 

“As to the demise of the Zero 21, I believe most of my information comes from John Crommelin concerning its loss. Since his brother, Richard, was involved he had more than casual interest in the mishap. Dick, a friend, classmate from USNA, classmate Pensacola, room mate almost a year while we were in VF-42, Yorktown, was headed West with his squadron, VF-88, and they were in San Diego for transportation. As C.O., but also with John seeing to Dick’s education, it was logical he should get a Zero hop. On taxiing out for this hop, Dick was overtaken by an airplane, SB2C-4, which has miserable vision ahead when in the 3 point attitude. The “Beast” just sawed its way through the Zero from tail to cockpit stopping just short of Dick. Truly, it as a tragedy for the machine, but a miracle for Dick. Pity we later lost him over Hokkaido on one of our last TF-38 strikes of the war.”

 

The various parts mentioned in the narrative were eventually donated to the Navy museum at Anacostia, where they now reside. I retained the original photos.

 

Rich

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Rich, that's some groovy stuff. Although I'd known the basic cause of this Zero's demise, I'd never heard any particulars before... thanks much!

 

"It went to Tactical Air Intelligence Center (TAIC)"

Shouldn't that be 'Technical', or was there a name change at sometime?

 

 

Okay, next up... here's a Ki-44...

 

Ki-44002c.jpg

Project 914 Archives

 

 

Fade to Black...


Steve O. Reno

(formerly BlackWolf3945 here on USMF)

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...

HAWKSNESTSig1.jpg

Seeking Curtiss-Wright aircraft photos, especially the P-40, P-36, & O-52...

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I just type what he wrote. I suspect he meant 'technical' but said 'tactical' as the Navy end of the Anacostia TAIC operation eventually morphed, along with Flight Test, into the Naval Air Test Center and thence into Tactical Test at Pax River NAS.

 

Regretfully, he's not around to ask anymore.

 

Rich

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Okay, I thought it might have been something like that. I had to ask because I've seen both 'technical' and 'tactical' used and didn't know if it changed to the latter sometime during the war or not.

 

Here's another view of that Ki-44...

 

Ki-44001b.jpg

Image source: unknown web

 

 

Fade to Black...


Steve O. Reno

(formerly BlackWolf3945 here on USMF)

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...

HAWKSNESTSig1.jpg

Seeking Curtiss-Wright aircraft photos, especially the P-40, P-36, & O-52...

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And a Ki-84 Hayate, code-named 'Frank' by the Allies...

 

Ki-44001c.jpg

Project 914 Archives

 

 

Fade to Black...


Steve O. Reno

(formerly BlackWolf3945 here on USMF)

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug...

HAWKSNESTSig1.jpg

Seeking Curtiss-Wright aircraft photos, especially the P-40, P-36, & O-52...

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Guest dpluth

post-616-1171592713.jpgA little history for you on the two Oscars.

 

Raccoon Special (serial number: 6863) was rebuild by the 8th Fighter Group starting in June 1944 on the Hollandia strip in Hollandia. The name Raccoon Special came from the units call sign.

 

The group had to rebuild the canopy and windscreen and the actual plexi that is used came from a Betty and the canopy itself came from an old P-40.

 

A group of Air Technical Intel guys arrived and took over the build. The first test flight was approximately June 21st.

 

The aircraft ended up at XJ004 with the TAIC.

 

The Oscar from the 84th was rebuilt beginning in May 1944. This aircraft ended up as XJ005. This aircraft was on the Cyclops field in Hollandia. The aircraft flew in September of 1944 and then was transfered to the TAIC for futher testing.

 

The fellows that rebuilt these aircraft were extremely proud of them. They had very limited resources and limited time while performing other duties. While they weren't as important to the effort as the Koga Zero they were still a great accomplishment.

 

-Dave

 

Photo Credit: Hepford

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Okay, I know what some are gonna say when they see these next three photos...

 

"But... it's a Japanese plane! This is the US Militaria forum!!!"

 

Patience grasshoppers, and all will be revealed...

Koga001.jpg

ACME news photo in the holdings of the University of Alaska

Koga002.jpg

ACME news photo in the holdings of the University of Alaska

Koga003.jpg

Don Miller collection via Project 914 Archives

Fade to Black...

 

Are these pics taken in the Aleutians?.

 

Dave.


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gif

 

**PLEASE NOTE: THIS COMMUNITY MEMBER HAS SADLY PASSED AWAY**

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/61663-forum-member-bilkos-dave-death-reported/

 

 

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Guest dpluth

Yes on Akutan Island.

 

-Dave

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I would like to see more U.S. planes in German Markings. I have read in a few places about all black painted B-17's in German hands. I also remeber seeing a picture of a B-24 in Romanian markings.


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gif

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