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Lets See Your Impressions!


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This is the photo I took my avatar from. This was taken about 4 years ago of me and my closest friends when we were serving as the 2nd Battalion staff in the ACWA. This is my absolute favorite reenactor photo.

Kevin

 

w00t.gifw00t.gifw00t.gif WOW I thought that was a real photo!!!!!! INCREDIBLE!!!!!! I love the fact that no one is smilling, perfect!! thumbs up!!!!

 

Paul

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Evening Dogfaces,

 

This is my interpretation so far, as there are very few picture of the U.S. 550th Glider Infantry Battalion assigned to the First Airborne Task Force.

 

So, here without further adue is my interpretation of the U.S. 550th Glider Infantry Battalion after just landing in the French Riviera during Operation Rugby on August 15th, 1944.

 

Enjoy!

 

Basic Kit:

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p254/ac...did/FABTF_0.jpg

 

Front:

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p254/ac...did/FABTF_2.jpg

 

Back:

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p254/ac...did/FABTF_1.jpg

 

Right Side:

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p254/ac...did/FABTF_4.jpg

 

Left Side:

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p254/ac...did/FABTF_3.jpg

 

My Kill Stance, :D :

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p254/ac...did/FABTF_5.jpg

 

Feel free to give any criticism you feel necessary.

 

*Note ~ Remember this is still a work in progress with very little evidence to base this impression off of. So its just an interpretation based off of what most standard ground troops would have been wearing during Operation Anvil/Dragoon.

 

V/R,

FRISCAN


 

"The Galloping Ghost of the North African Coast"

TC1c James F. Dunigan, III
Gunnery Division 4, U.S.S. Savannah, CL-42

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Great stuff Friscan, I am also guilty of note paying attention like I should to the Pacific Theatre.

Keep it up,

Capa

 

 

 

Evening Gentlemen,

 

Tonight I'm going to bring you one of my most recent impressions I've been working on. This impression is of little known and under represented U.S. 5307th Composite Unit(Provisional) a.k.a. "Merrill's Marauders"...

 

My objective with this impression is to eventually cover all facets of the 5307th from February 1944 to January 1945 when they returned stateside. Right now I've only got the combat look set up so here ya go...

 

Frontal View ~

5307_1.jpg

 

Rear View ~

5307_2.jpg

 

Stopped For The Evening ~

5307_3.jpg

 

Scouting (1) ~

5307_4.jpg

 

Scouting (2) ~

5307_5.jpg

 

Scouting (3) ~

5307_6.jpg

 

On the move in the heat of the Burmese jungle (1) ~

5307_7.jpg

 

Stopped on a trail (1) ~

5307_8.jpg

 

Stopped on a trail (2) ~

5307_9.jpg

 

Impression is made up of the following:

 

Original:

1st Pattern Herringbone Twill, Working Man's Cap "Daisy Mae"(Original)

M-1 Fixed bail Helmet w/ 2nd Pattern Hawley Liner(Original)

1st Pattern Herringbone Twill, Working Man's Jacket(Original)

M-1937 Field Service Trousers(Original)

M-1938 Service Leggings, Dismounted(Original)

M-1928 Haversack w/ contents and "Meat Can" contents(Original)

M-1923 Cartridge Belt w/ Duel Canteens, Cups, and Covers, also M-1942 First Aid Pouch w/ kit(Original)

U.S. Rifle Caliber .30 M-1(Original)

 

Reproduction:

1st Pattern Herringbone Twill, Working Man's Trousers(WWII Impressions)

OD Tank Top Undershirt(At The Front)

Cushioned Sole Socks(WWII Impressions)

Type I Service Shoes(WWII Impressions)

Trouser Belt w/ Open Faced Buckle(WWII Impressions)

M-1910 E-Tool("T" Handle Shovel)(At The Front)

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Here's my old group

I'm bottom left with TSMG

group_01a.jpg

 

F/58/ L. Company Rangers

DSC00806.jpg

 

Me and Bro John

JohnandRoque.jpg

 

My Company Ration store

closet12038.jpg

 

My "Army Junk Closet"

000_0740.jpg

 

D Day Display at a School

IMG_5681-1.jpg

 

Bald is Beauty, me at Pope in the 80's

rockpope.jpg

 

Cold War Vet

untitled.jpg

2RO2.jpg

 

2/505th (RA) 5/502nd (RA) 2/505th (REEN)

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You do see a lot of period pictures, WWII included of soldiers that were a little more ''touchy feely" hug.gif than we are today. I guess they were not as worried about being labeled a "sissy boy" console.gif (trying to be politically correct :unsure: ) as we are today.

 

great point. You will even see them using each other for pillows from time to time. Imagine doing that in today's Army or Marines!!!!

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Yes Paul,

 

Camp Roberts in February 2008. Good guys one and all. I no longer do Vietnam so if anybody has some WWII stuff to trade for my Vietnam stuff let me know. I have a whole duffle of gear and one pair of jungle fats.

 

Rock

2RO2.jpg

 

2/505th (RA) 5/502nd (RA) 2/505th (REEN)

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Nice impressions guys.

 

@ Sgt Rock easy Co.

I love those (selfmade ?) rations.

There are not a lot belgian re-enactors that do that (but their are :P )

 

Here is my impression of last saturday.

35th ID soldier walking in the ardennes (the event was: "In the footsteps of the 82nd AB 2009", it was a historic walk of 19km)

 

6afbeelding026qj8.jpg

I was here half way through tha walk

 

18Afbeelding087ZW.jpg

Less than a mile.

 

1Afbeelding002kopie.jpg

Some guys from ower squad (i'm was walking in front of them)

 

 

Kind Regards Vincent

Banner%202.jpg
http://www.trgb.org/

Always intrested in 104th ID Photographs and other stuff of the 104th ID.

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This isn't exactly the best photo of me in my WWII impression, but there you have it. This was taken at an event in Yorktown, VA last December. I'm portraying a female WAC veterinary technician. (Sorry, it's a scan of a photocopy ... I just found out this existed, as I don't get this paper.)

 

Press001-vi.jpg

k9vetsday.jpg
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Fantastic PIC's!

I very appreciate the 82nd!

 

Nice pictures. Pointer= Troops didn't start carrying their weapon in the modern "Ready" grip until the 1990's. I've seen WWII Reenactors trying to emulate the modern method of weapons carry also. Into and through the 1980's the only time you carried your weapon is this fashion is when it was a small SMG or you were fighting in an Urban Terrain and were forced to high carry your weapon for corner shots.

 

Rock

2RO2.jpg

 

2/505th (RA) 5/502nd (RA) 2/505th (REEN)

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Nice pictures. Pointer= Troops didn't start carrying their weapon in the modern "Ready" grip until the 1990's. I've seen WWII Reenactors trying to emulate the modern method of weapons carry also. Into and through the 1980's the only time you carried your weapon is this fashion is when it was a small SMG or you were fighting in an Urban Terrain and were forced to high carry your weapon for corner shots.

 

Rock

 

How come, (I don't remember) we weren't allowed to carry the M16 by its carrying handle? I DO remember in Basic Training, Fort Ord California, 1972, running across a field holding on to the carrying handle, and "the mud hit the fan" the nice Drill Sgt. yelled/screamed at me "HEY YOU, JOHN WAYNE, GET DOWN AND GIMME TWENTY"!

"Old tankers never die, they just smell that way!"

A co. 4/73rd Armor, 1st Infantry Division (Forward)

 

donation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gif

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How come, (I don't remember) we weren't allowed to carry the M16 by its carrying handle? I DO remember in Basic Training, Fort Ord California, 1972, running across a field holding on to the carrying handle, and "the mud hit the fan" the nice Drill Sgt. yelled/screamed at me "HEY YOU, JOHN WAYNE, GET DOWN AND GIMME TWENTY"!

 

You hold your weapon, oriented to react immediately to a threat. The top carrying handle has no trigger and the weapon is not a suitcase. The carrying handle is for handing your weapon to someone else, for protecting the upper receiver and for securing the weapon to something else. You shold hold your weapon as they did in the time period you are representing. The high ready position they use today was not used until the 1990's and beyond.

 

Rock

2RO2.jpg

 

2/505th (RA) 5/502nd (RA) 2/505th (REEN)

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You hold your weapon, oriented to react immediately to a threat. The top carrying handle has no trigger and the weapon is not a suitcase. The carrying handle is for handing your weapon to someone else, for protecting the upper receiver and for securing the weapon to something else. You shold hold your weapon as they did in the time period you are representing. The high ready position they use today was not used until the 1990's and beyond.

 

Rock

 

Thanks for the simple and logical answer!

"Old tankers never die, they just smell that way!"

A co. 4/73rd Armor, 1st Infantry Division (Forward)

 

donation2009.gifdonation2010.gif

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gif

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You hold your weapon, oriented to react immediately to a threat. The top carrying handle has no trigger and the weapon is not a suitcase. The carrying handle is for handing your weapon to someone else, for protecting the upper receiver and for securing the weapon to something else. You shold hold your weapon as they did in the time period you are representing. The high ready position they use today was not used until the 1990's and beyond.

 

Rock

 

Could you tell me the exact purpose of the "high" position? Is it mainly for urban warfare (like when peering around corners)? Is there really more of an advantage to it in open combat?

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Could you tell me the exact purpose of the "high" position? Is it mainly for urban warfare (like when peering around corners)? Is there really more of an advantage to it in open combat?

 

The "high ready" position is my terminology. Modern slings and doctrine have placed the buttstock of the typical M-4 high and nearly against the shoulder. The weapon is in position for a quicker and proper firing position compared to previous generations. The M4 is shorter so it doesn't meld against the body like older and longer weapons.

 

During the 1980's we would hold our M16A1's by the pistol grip and pivot the weapon around corners during mout operations. This shortened the weapons length and exposed less of the body to return fire.

 

The "high ready" position you see today is a function of equipment modifications and modern tactics. Watching WWII Reenactors trying to hold their M1's like that is almost funny. Also, Vietnam Reenactors ditto... it's not natural to the period.

 

Rock

2RO2.jpg

 

2/505th (RA) 5/502nd (RA) 2/505th (REEN)

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The "high ready" position is my terminology. Modern slings and doctrine have placed the buttstock of the typical M-4 high and nearly against the shoulder. The weapon is in position for a quicker and proper firing position compared to previous generations. The M4 is shorter so it doesn't meld against the body like older and longer weapons.

 

During the 1980's we would hold our M16A1's by the pistol grip and pivot the weapon around corners during mout operations. This shortened the weapons length and exposed less of the body to return fire.

 

The "high ready" position you see today is a function of equipment modifications and modern tactics. Watching WWII Reenactors trying to hold their M1's like that is almost funny. Also, Vietnam Reenactors ditto... it's not natural to the period.

 

Rock

 

Oh yeah it's really funny actually. That's what I thought, the buttstock was higher. It is very awkward trying to hold an M1 in the "high ready" position. I actually always wondered about this, thanks for clearing it up!

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Meatcarvermass.jpg

 

Here's me, circa 1999 in full FSSF gear.

In memory of 1LT Julius C. Goldman, XO of F/330th, 83rd Infantry Division 1944-45.

 

Looking for P-47 and Tactical Reconnaissance Unit photographs and any items associated with WWII Jewish fighter pilots.

 

donation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gif

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I have higher quality images, but I was on facebook at the same time I was reading this. So you get what you get! I sure do have a lot of these..

 

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2...052682_5760.jpg

 

http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc...9_709587_17.jpg

 

http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2...418479_5374.jpg

 

http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2...617926_9438.jpg

 

http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2..._695583_816.jpg

 

http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2..._599158_422.jpg

 

http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2..._681954_188.jpg

 

http://photos-c.ll.facebook.com/photos-ll-...124442_1752.jpg

 

http://photos-d.ll.facebook.com/photos-ll-...124443_2328.jpg

 

http://photos-e.ll.facebook.com/photos-ll-...124444_2886.jpg

 

http://www.26yd.com/FIG2009k19.JPG

 

http://www.26yd.com/windsor2008a5.JPG

 

I'm the goofy smiling bastard humpin' the tripod in that last one. Captainofthe7th(Rob) has the ammunition box. Since he's half retarded, a midget, and weighs 30 pounds wet, I got to carry the gun or tripod all day, in the 100 plus Vermont heat, with wondrous rolling hills...and he carried the dwindling ammunition box.

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Nice pictures:

 

The last picture, I assume you guys were just trying to get into the frame of the picture? I've seen all too many reenactors gaggle up close, kinda like safety in numbers. In light of day, in open terrain you should be spread out so one burst from an MG or a mortar shell can't take the whole crew out. :)

 

Rock

2RO2.jpg

 

2/505th (RA) 5/502nd (RA) 2/505th (REEN)

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The last picture was actually just supposed to be of me, but the guy screwed it up, as you can tell.

 

The picture of the crew and I, we were a rearward element moving up, the battle had already started elsewhere.

 

I have buddies in Reenacting that have 60mm and 81mm mortars that can reach out to nearly 500 yards. The Germans avoid bunching up for this reason. Even the rear-most element must be prepared for close contact. This super important detail is often lost in all but the military. How many "Rear Element/Echelon" units you think were surprised and unprepared? It's a matter of pride and dicipline for a unit to maintain a state of preparedeness from the top Officer to the lowest private.

 

Read the book "We Were Soldiers Once and Young", if you haven't already. The Top Officer (a wwii vet) treated his movement to an LZ like a training exercise and his unit was cut to pieces by a fast moving ambush. His guys weren't prepared and had let their guard down along the entire length of the column. He had ordered all of his Company Commanders up to his location, reducing their command effectiveness. If you assume the best but get the worst then it's poor leadership. If you plan for, and are prepared for a worst case scenario then you are well led. I've yelled at reenactors to not bunch up and been blown off- a short time later their "gaggle" was blown up by a German Mortar round. You must spread out properly at all times, regardless of the situation. Anything else is just an excuse.

 

Rock

2RO2.jpg

 

2/505th (RA) 5/502nd (RA) 2/505th (REEN)

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I'm the goofy smiling bastard humpin' the tripod in that last one. Captainofthe7th(Rob) has the ammunition box. Since he's half retarded, a midget, and weighs 30 pounds wet, I got to carry the gun or tripod all day, in the 100 plus Vermont heat, with wondrous rolling hills...and he carried the dwindling ammunition box.

 

Watch is Jonesy...

 

n750924130_682827_52.jpg

 

You didn't have that damn tripod ALL day!

 

Rob

Exhausting & Dirty Work



Interested in buying identified or re-searchable Korean War uniforms, groupings, medals and more.

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