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Episcopal Altar set


Grant S.
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The museum has this set, described as "Episcopal Altar Set" in its collection. There is no box, nor any vestements. After doing some research I have more questions than answers. I had assumed that all faiths had different sets, but now I'm not sure. It seems like there was a basic set, and a communion set for Catholics (and, I thought, Episcopalians, but we do not have one). So now I don't know if this set is complete. There are no glasses, nor any bottles (which I assume are for wine and/or holy water?). I also don't know the era of this set, as it is completely unmarked. I was hoping to build a display around this set, but now I'm thinking it isn't "correct" enough to build on. So once again I throw myself on the mercy of the forum to see if anyone can comment on the completeness/authenticity of this set.

 

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I PMed member Chap for him to give a look see, he's a former Army Padre with an interest in Military Ecclesiastical items and Histories from the various periods, if any one can help it would be him.

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The cross, candlesticks and host container (metal container) are from a US kit. The chalice and lavabo bowl is from the same era. I've seen both British and US kits have them. I cannot tell what the three smaller items are? Perhaps better pictures please. That said, together this could have been used as a kit for a Church of England during WWII. It is missing a set of cruets.

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Thank you both. The three small items are actually one item disassembled. A cup on the left, its lid in the center, with a small tubular opening, and a stopper for that opening on the right. It is tagged as a cruet, which it could very well be in this context. I seem to remember it might have a small "V" on it, I'll check again. Unfortunately there is only one. I'm only in on Thursdays so I won't know for another week. thanks again!

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Thank you both. The three small items are actually one item disassembled. A cup on the left, its lid in the center, with a small tubular opening, and a stopper for that opening on the right. It is tagged as a cruet, which it could very well be in this context. I seem to remember it might have a small "V" on it, I'll check again. Unfortunately there is only one. I'm only in on Thursdays so I won't know for another week. thanks again!

V? Would that be the British Government Broad Arrow?

 

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I looked again and found no "U.S." on the candlesticks, which is mentioned in Military Collectibles as the way U.S. sets were marked. What I thought was possibly a cruet actually looks like a miniature jigger - it even has marks on the side with 1, 1 1/2, and 2 - as if it were measuring ounces. There is no "V" (or "A") anywhere. The bottom of the "cruet" is marked "Pat. Pend" over "Napier" over "Silver plate" (IIRC). Napier shows up as an American jeweler that did a lot of work in silver. Sooooo, I'm still in the dark. Perhaps it is a civilian set? Private purchase?

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The candlesticks and other items in the pic were not U.S. issued and therefore would not be stamped U.S.

But they were used by chaplains and were provided by their denominations during and after the war.

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The candlesticks and other items in the pic were not U.S. issued and therefore would not be stamped U.S.

But they were used by chaplains and were provided by their denominations during and after the war.

Interesting sir. So then churches of both the Protestent and Roman denominations donated Ecclesiastical items to the Military during WWII?

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Interesting sir. So then churches of both the Protestent and Roman denominations donated Ecclesiastical items to the Military during WWII?

 

To be exact, they donated them to the men who represented their denomination in the Military.

A fine line it is. The military doesn't take donations. They are fully supported by the State (Congress) and directed by the State. Otherwise they could be mercenaries for hire depending upon whoever "donates" the most.

 

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To be exact, they donated them to the men who represented their denomination in the Military.

A fine line it is. The military doesn't take donations. They are fully supported by the State (Congress) and directed by the State. Otherwise they could be mercenaries for hire depending upon whoever "donates" the most.

 

Thank you sir.

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