Jump to content

I have made a terrible mistake.


Recommended Posts

My experience with oil, is that once it's in there it's pretty much stained for good.

 

Exactly what was it you used to oil it?

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif
donation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, once oil stains something, it's in there for good. Best case scenario is that over time the oil MAY lighten (but never disappear).

In memory of Lance Corporal Jeremy S. Lasher, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force. Killed in Action July 23, 2009, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Semper Fi

Lance Corporal's 2/8 challenge coin was STOLEN from his grave. Please see the following forum link for details: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/210650-challenge-coin-stolen-from-marine-kia-grave/&do=findComment&comment=1654270

 



My eBay Auctions: http://shop.ebay.com...s/m.html?_dmd=1

donation2013.gifdonation2014.gif




		
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be more worried about the long-term effect on the leather. There is almost no good reason for "treating" leather on historic artifacts: most of the time it provides no long term protection and may even do short term damage (discoloring the leather) or long term damage. Storage conditions probably more than anything else determine the aging process for what is basically decaying flesh.

 

Throughout the forum are links to the modern day takes on leather "preservation" or conservation by museum pros. Some of that info is summarized nicely in this post: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/24966-preserving-leather/?p=180114


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif

donation2018.gifdonation2019.gif

donation2019.gif

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be more worried about the long-term effect on the leather. There is almost no good reason for "treating" leather on historic artifacts: most of the time it provides no long term protection and may even do short term damage (discoloring the leather) or long term damage. Storage conditions probably more than anything else determine the aging process for what is basically decaying flesh.

 

Throughout the forum are links to the modern day takes on leather "preservation" or conservation by museum pros. Some of that info is summarized nicely in this post: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/24966-preserving-leather/?p=180114

 

 

I wholeheartedly agree.

 

At this point I don't think there is much that can be done though.

 

RC

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif
donation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to risk it try a dish soap like dawn or some thing similar. If Im thinking correctly the oil you used is organic? Not synthetic or petroleum based?

 

Even Shout or Simple Green may remove it or possibly lemon juice or a citrus based degreaser.

 

At any rate if you decide to proceed I would say to first gently vacuum the tail piece once removed or brush it with a soft nylon brush to remove residual dirt and then pretreat withv the cleaner you want to use and hand wash in cold water and air dry.

 

A friend has a good report using naptha on a cloth to take out or lightly clean old canvas.

 

Ultimately its your item and decision. Good luck and keep us informed

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





Link to post
Share on other sites

Just don't lay it in the sun to dry, or use a dryer.

 

RC

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif
donation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found the mildest and most effective product was Dawn Dishwashing Soap as Ron mentioned.

"There is no such thing as an expert, only students with different levels of education."
donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

do you think kitty litter alone would work? thats an idea!

 

it works well on wet oil spots on the driveway, but I dont know if it would work on a dry stain? you could try it, it might lift enough oil out to make it look less noticable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dry litter may be an option but litter is a bentonite base.Basically a clay.If you wet it it gets real slimy.

 

Just a little from experiance we were in South Dakota one time on motorcycles and came to road construction.Basically they tore the road out from fence line to fence line.It had been raining.The resulting road base was a mass of grey slimy mud.We had six miles of fun riding through it(if you call it riding)Dodging tire ruts 8-12 inches or more deep from semi trucks that cut into the mass of goo.Long story short we found out a lot of the base material was bentonite.A base item for kitty litter and a lubricant when wet used for drilling in the oil industry.When the grey slime dried it was like concrete stuck to the wheels and fenders let alone our leathers and boots.I love South Dakota.Never a dull moment and beautiful riding country.

In Memoriam:
Lieutenant J.Kostelec 1-3 First Special Service Force MIA/PD 4 March 1944 Italy
I HAVE SEEN THE ENEMY AND IT IS DAYLIGHT
Forget about the tips..We'll get hell to pay (AC/DC)
"If you cant get out and run with the big dogs then sit on the porch and bark at the cars going by.."

Have you Hugged a Clown Today?

You Cant Get A Sun Tan On The Moon..





Link to post
Share on other sites

Rice is a poor mans desiccant. Of course, desiccant is pretty cheap nowadays and works better than rice.

"There is no such thing as an expert, only students with different levels of education."
donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read that if you rub chalk or baby powder all over the oil spot.. then rinse with water the chalk/powder binds the oil and removes it.

 

I have not tried this so go forward cautiously.

GOT SEABEE ITEMS? PM ME!

donation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif

donation2017.gif

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...

BABY TALCUM POWDER POURED ONTO THE OILY SPOT, RUBBED INTO THE MATERIAL, SHOULD ABSORB THE ERRANT OIL RESIDUE, WITHOUT ANY TERMINAL EFFECTS ON THE CANVAS CLOTH. I HOPE THIS PROCEDURE HELPS, GIH

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.