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USS Maine Cap Tally


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My opinion: wrong style. By that time, US Navy Cap Ribbons were pretty standard. Yes, variations did exists, but not that common. Lack of age, I have bullion insignia that I wore that has more tarnish than this. The ribbon looks like some one tried to TIE it on a hat. This is a sure sign of a reenactor. Main and Olympia Cap Ribbons were reproduced and available through reenactor vendors during the SpanAm Centenial. Again, just my opinion, but I would take this as an incorrect and unauthentic repop for a reenactor.

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My opinion: wrong style. By that time, US Navy Cap Ribbons were pretty standard. Yes, variations did exists, but not that common. Lack of age, I have bullion insignia that I wore that has more tarnish than this. The ribbon looks like some one tried to TIE it on a hat. This is a sure sign of a reenactor. Main and Olympia Cap Ribbons were reproduced and available through reenactor vendors during the SpanAm Centenial. Again, just my opinion, but I would take this as an incorrect and unauthentic repop for a reenactor.

 

I agree with the above in that I don't think this ribbon was worn by a Spanish American War era or any American sailor for that matter.

 

What I can't get is a reasonable feel from the photos is its age. Heavy bullion cap ribbons were sometimes worn both in the 1890's, and then again for a short time right after WW I. However, the construction of this one is not like those from either of those time periods. The lack of tarnish is also troubling, but not in my opinion the deciding factor.

 

The construction does not look like the modern fakes I have seen, but I would not rule that out either, as there are some very low production repros out there that are pretty convincing.

 

If after looking at it I thought it had some real age to it, my thought is that it is probably something produced for the civilian market as a souvenir or to be used and sold to women for fashion....meaning to go with a homespun sailor suit...the kind worn with a dress. I have also seen similarly constructed ribbons tied to little flat hats on turn of the century Teddy Bears.

 

I think if this is 100 or so years old, it is kind of neat as a souvenir item from the times....but not worth a lot. If it is not old, I agree its nothing.

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I didn't see this post until now, and I agree with the above...it's not one that had service on the Maine.

 

I'd say, judging from the bullion work, it could range from the 40s through the 60s...but that's just my guess.

Only a weak society needs government protection or intervention before it pursues its resolve to preserve the truth. Truth needs neither handcuffs nor a badge for its vindication. -Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy

Peace is not the absence of war, but the defense of hard-won freedom. -Anton LaGuardia


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There was a second U.S.S. MAINE (BB-10) commissioned in 1902. Sailed as part of the Great White Fleet to the Pacific. Decommissioned in 1922. Personally I don't get warm fuzzies from this ribbon. Just my 2-cents. Bobgee

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"I have only two men out of my company and 20 out of some other company. We need support, but it is almost suicide to try to get it here as we are swept by machine gun fire and constant barrage is on us. I have no one on my left and only a few on my right. I will hold." (Message sent by 1st Lt. Clifton B. Cates. USMC, 96th Co., Soissons, 19 July 1918 - later 19th Commandant of the Marine Corps 1948-1952)

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Is it possible this tally is associated with the carrier USS Maine ? Did they even use these during that period ? I know Im grasping for straws here . Just want to be sure before I toss it in the junk box . Thanks guys .

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Is it possible this tally is associated with the carrier USS Maine ? Did they even use these during that period ? I know Im grasping for straws here . Just want to be sure before I toss it in the junk box . Thanks guys .

 

There wasn't a carrier USS Maine, but there is currently is a Trident Submarine using that name.

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Sigsaye is correct.Below is a picture of a whipped bullion cap ribbon from just after WW I. Notice the workmanship is much better, the ribbon is silk without the ribbing, and it is not tied to the cap.attachicon.gifnavy_flat_top_7004.jpg

just a quick note, the ribbone

S were never tied to the flat hats. The bow was always a separate item stitcher to the side of the cap. The ribbon was then fitted around the ciao, with the ends trimmed and tucked under the bow. The ribbon would then be stitched to the cap. If you find one tire to the cap, that is a tip off that it is a reenactor item. Not sure why, but they seem to think the ribbon is tied. Don't understand that.

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