Jump to content

Naval Air Squadrons - Fixed Wing 'V' Squadrons


 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
Salvage Sailor
VS-892 Activated for the Korean War flying TBM'S aboard the escort carrier USS RENDOVA (CVE-114) in 1951 (Naval Reserve Squadron). They were later redesignated as VS-38, the well known Red Griffins


VS-38 Red Griffins Lineage:


VC-892 Reserve squadron. Activated 20 Jul 1950

VC-892 Redesignated VS-892 4 Aug 1950

VS-892 Reserve squadron called to active duty 4 Aug 1950

VS-892 Redesignated VS-38 4 Feb 1953

VS-38 Deactivated 30 Apr 2004

VS 892 Korean War 001.jpg

VS 892 Korean War 002.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
Salvage Sailor

VA-305 LOBOS - Attack Squadron 305, Naval Reserve 1970-1986 NAS Point Mugu, CA (they became VFA-305 from 1987 to 1994

VA 305 LOBOS USNR 001.jpg

VA 305 LOBOS USNR 002.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Salvage Sailor

RVAH-64 EAGLE EYES - Reconnaissance Attack Heavy Squadron Fourteen, in service 1968 to 1974



RVAH-14 was the second squadron specifically formed to operate the RA-5C Vigilante and was most short-lived of any RVAH squadron. RVAH-14 was initially established on 1 February 1968 at NAS Sanford, Florida in order to accommodate the impending commissioning of the USS John F. Kennedy, the latter of which was scheduled for 7 September 1968. Throughout its existence, RVAH-14 concentrated on Cold War operations, primarily in support of the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean, and was the only frontline RVAH squadron not to see action during the Vietnam War. The squadron's emblem was created by cartoonist Roy Crane, the creator of the Buz Sawyer comic strip. RVAH-14 was selected to be the first RVAH squadron to inactivate. As a result, on 1 May 1974, before it could be transferred with the other RVAH squadrons to NAS Key West, RVAH-14 was disestablished at NAS Albany, Georgia


RVAH 14 EAGLE EYES 001.jpg

RVAH 14 EAGLE EYES 002.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...
Salvage Sailor

VA-95 GREEN LIZARDS (ATKRON 95) LIZARDS LAST ROMP - WESTPAC 1995 USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (CVN-72/CVW-11) VA-95 was disestablished on November 18, 1995

VA 95 CVN 72 USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN 1995 WESTPAC 003.jpg

VA 95 CVN 72 USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN 1995 WESTPAC 004.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
Salvage Sailor

VS-22 CHECKMATES (AIRASRON 22) - Full size decal from a Skyhawk Airedales' collection

 

Jet transitions started in the summer of 1974 with pilots training in Rockwell T-2C Buckeyes and Douglas TA-4J Skyhawks at NAS Meridian, Mississippi, making VS-22 the first east coast based S-3A squadron. With the retirement of the anti-submarine carriers the anti-submarine squadrons were integrated into the former attack carrier air wings. From 1976 to 2001 VS-22 was assigned to Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3). Between 1976 and 1980 VS-22 made four deployments aboard the USS Saratoga. After the Saratoga went to drydock in September 1980, CVW-3 transitioned to deployments aboard the USS America CV-66. The squadron transitioned to the S-3B in 1989.

VS 22 CHECKMATES decal 001.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Salvage Sailor

VS-34 PROUD TIGERS (AIRASRON 45) - Disestablished in 1968. Full size decal from a Skyhawk Airedales' collection

VS 34 PROUD TIGERS decal 001.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Salvage Sailor

VA(HM)-10 HEAVY ATTACK MINING SQUADRON TEN - 1956 to 1959 (Previously and subsequently VP-17)

 

On 1 JUL 56, while deployed to NAF Naha, Okinawa, Japan, Patrol Squadron Seventeen (VP-17) was redesignated Heavy Attack Mining Squadron Ten.

 

VA(HM)-10 was one of two such squadrons in the NAVY. One west coast - one east coast. Flying Lockheed P2V-6 Neptunes, VA(HM)-10 retained the tail letters-"BH".

In April of 1957 the squadron began to transition to the P2V-5F. The squadron's P2V-6M aircraft were transferred to the reserves in preparation for a WestPac deployment in the -5Fs. On 1 SEP 57, VA(HM)-10 deployed to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan and FAW-6 with their -5Fs. All NAVY patrol squadrons received new tail codes letters on 9 DEC 57. VA(HM)-10 dropped their old "BH" tail code and began using "ZE".
On 18 MAY 59 the squadron deployed with their -5Fs to NAS Kodiak, Alaska. On 1 JUL 59 Heavy Attack Mining Squadron Ten (VA(HM)-10) was redesignated back to PATROL SQUADRON SEVENTEEN (VP-17)

 

VA(HM) 10 Heavy Attack Mining Squadron Ten 1956 1959 (VP-17) 001.jpg

VA(HM) 10 Heavy Attack Mining Squadron Ten 1956 1959 (VP-17) 002.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Here are some original salty, actually used patches I have obtained recently.

 

P-3 Orion, P-3 Inflight Technician patch, and a nice VP-45 safety pro patch. The first two patches are on Velcro and are named to "Coker".

 

post-10825-0-96307500-1533475343_thumb.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Salvage Sailor

Nice Bobcat patch Hink, you should post that one on the VT Training Squadron topic http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/262632-vt-ht-naval-aviation-training-squadron-patches/

 

Very few TACLERON or VAQ Squadron patches posted yet........

 

VAQ-138 YELLOWJACKETS Electronic Attack Squadron 138 (VAQRON 138) Established in 1976 at NAS Whidbey Island.

 

This is their first cut edge patch circa 1976 when they were known as Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 138 (TACLERON 138)

VAQ 138 YELLOWJACKETS TACLERON 138 001.jpg

VAQ 138 YELLOWJACKETS TACLERON 138 002.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 4 weeks later...

My late father's version of the VA-152 patch used during his command. Made in Japan upon returning from their 1968 combat deployment while aboard the USS Oriskany (CVA-34). At that time they were still flying the AD Skyraider. During that deployment CVW-16 endured 31 shoot downs. My father was a lucky survivor.

 

Found an image of that 31st shoot down which can be seen on the deck of the Mighty O here http://raunchyredskins.us/operations/Wildman%20Bruflat.1.jpg

. Father is seen in the back ground wearing his khakis, flat top hair cut and USNA ring just visible. .

 

Soon after their return to NAS Alameda VA-152 to transition to the A-4 Skyhawk. Created by combining men from both VA-152 and VSF-4 CHESSMEN and all VSF-4 A-4 Skyhawks a/c.

 

post-6553-0-32109900-1541330618.jpg

 

I've been acquainted with that same version of the VA-152 patch for over 50 years.

 

Cheers, Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thought to include a VSF-3 patch to this thread. Especially since the combination of their Skyhawk a/c and men played such a great part in what initially made up VA-152. Soon after to be known as THE MAVERICKS.

 

Original patches from this squadron are rare. As the life of this particular squadron was very short lived.As far as I know only existing long enough to do a work up a single WESTPAC combat tour.

 

post-6553-0-74501600-1541525925.jpg

 

This particular patch is one of the many 1950's & 1960's squadron patches from within my collection, I am of the opinion that this was the finest patch made for any and all USN A-4 Skyhawk squadrons.

 

Cheers, Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Salvage Sailor

Nice one Bearmon, looks good.....

 

 

Air Transport Squadron Twenty Four (VR-24) "The World's Biggest Little Airline" In Service 1946-1993

 

VR-24 Historical Summary:

The primary mission of VR-24 was to service the U.S. Navy 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, and when called upon, U.S. Naval Forces operating in other parts of the world. VR-24 and its Detachments delivered freight, mail, and personnel to U.S., NATO, and friendly foreign bases, ports of call, and via Carrier-On-deck-Delivery, to U.S. Navy ships at sea. VR-24 also performed life-saving medical evacuations and disaster relief missions throughout its far-flung areas of operation. To accomplish their mission, VR-24 air crews often flew in and out of airports that had only primitive communications and navigation aids, cargo handling equipment, and ground support services. Missions were often completed under the most adverse weather conditions. COD aircrews providing the vital link between land bases and ship at sea, often operated at maximum ranges from austere remote detachment sites. The men and women of VR-24 met these challenges through hard work, long hours, and innovation. VR-24 soon became known as the "world's biggest little airline" that could deliver .....................ANYTHING, ANYTIME, ANYWHERE.

 

Excellent History here on the VR-24 Association website http://www.vr-24.org/History.htm

VR 24 Gemsco 001.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...