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Does anyone know if the rikor mount boxes with the poly fiber inside are acid free. Specifically is the poly fiber acid free? I have stored military in these things for years, but would like to know I am not causing any damage to cloth, paper or metal items placed in them.

 

The older ones have a cotton wool insides? Are these better?

Thanks,

Jefmil

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I would say more important than the method is the environment in which you store your items.

^_^

 

climate/humidity controlled is key.

 

-Brian

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I'd be really careful with putting anything on that polyfil long term I think I've read somewhere on this forum about being very careful of storing on that poly stuff. If I am not mistaken sometimes there is adherence to medals etc of substance? perhaps someone can validate that

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I have a few Riker mounts and I cover the fill with unbleached 100% white cotton muslin as a barrier. I don't think it is necessary, but I like the added insurance.

 

Mike

I am always looking for named items to Central Illinois WWI veterans.

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I'd be really careful with putting anything on that polyfil long term I think I've read somewhere on this forum about being very careful of storing on that poly stuff. If I am not mistaken sometimes there is adherence to medals etc of substance? perhaps someone can validate that

I believe that you may be thinking of a foam type filler.

 

Another reason I like putting the fabric on is that it keeps pins etc from sticking in that poly stuff.

-Brian

GOT SEABEE ITEMS? PM ME!

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I believe that you may be thinking of a foam type filler.

 

Another reason I like putting the fabric on is that it keeps pins etc from sticking in that poly stuff.

-Brian

 

 

I think you are correct.......I just couldn't find the thread

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Store lots of my stuff in riker mounts and never had any problems

 

Matt

 

Me too. I've used Riker mounts for over 36 years now and never had any problem with any type filling they have causing any damage to any type insignia.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I've used Rikers for ages and never had any problem - until now. About 20 years ago I decided that the insignia looked better if I put a piece of tan burlap on top of the poly fill material. This week I was looking at some older rikers and found one in which I had placed one of those colored thin foam sheets over the poly fill. I had a nice Vietnamese made BDQ badge which, I think was made of a thin brass. It had developed a furry type of mold on it. I haven't yet tried to clean it and am wondering what's the best way to do so. Any help appreciated

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The ONLY way to answer this question is to k now exactly what the stuff is. Just that you have not noticed anything in years doesn't mean much. It's a scientific question as to if it is stable or not. Something may be fine for 30 years, but if you're talking 75 or 100 years it might be a very different story.

 

I suspect that the actual fiber content of them vary, and one company may use very good inert stuff, but then a second batch may be made in china and use something that is horrible.

 

However there is also the matter of the glass. A very thin layer of water can build up on the inside of the glass, (as in very, very thin) which can promote damage to whatever is right up against it. This is why they matt things when they frame them. Of course how and where they are stored.

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I've used Rikers for ages and never had any problem - until now. About 20 years ago I decided that the insignia looked better if I put a piece of tan burlap on top of the poly fill material. This week I was looking at some older rikers and found one in which I had placed one of those colored thin foam sheets over the poly fill. I had a nice Vietnamese made BDQ badge which, I think was made of a thin brass. It had developed a furry type of mold on it. I haven't yet tried to clean it and am wondering what's the best way to do so. Any help appreciated

 

Often the material is the reaction from the metal and the foam breaking down.I have seen the foam turn to a type of sticky dust and it can look like a mold that attaches to the medal or badge.For cleaning I would try a very soft nylon tooth brush.Either an old one you have used or new ones from the dollar store are cheap.If the badge is metaI(not bullion) I would try a little warm water and maybe a dish soap like dawn.Its not abrasive and it also had degreaser properties.Water and baking soda can work as well but baking soda can be a bit abrasive.

 

You can also buy a commercial jewelry cleaning solution at most jewelry stores but if your badge has an old patina to it this cleaner will definately remove patina/tarnish as its for cleaning silver and gold.

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  • 1 month later...

Yeah, I think the main problem with the Riker mounts is condensation under the glass, which can do a number on metals. True preservationists and museum curators frown on them, but then museums can afford storage drawer units and inert storage supplies than cost thousands of dollars.

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I've always used riker mounts and so far, they have been great. I really would like to have a red fabric on top of the fiber, but want to make sure that I choose a very safe fabric for long-term displays. I've attached a photo of what it looks like now, but would like to have the red fabric on top. Any suggestions?

 

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Will Twomey

In Honor of:

USA General John Wickham (1928-)

USAF Colonel Bernie Fisher MOH (1927-2014)

USMC Sergeant Al De Vito (Chosin Reservoir Survivor) (1926-)

USA Cpl. Macedonio Leyba (Bataan Death March survivor) (1917-2007)

 

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The ONLY way to answer this question is to k now exactly what the stuff is. Just that you have not noticed anything in years doesn't mean much. It's a scientific question as to if it is stable or not. Something may be fine for 30 years, but if you're talking 75 or 100 years it might be a very different story.

 

I suspect that the actual fiber content of them vary, and one company may use very good inert stuff, but then a second batch may be made in china and use something that is horrible.

 

the rikers I use all come with a sticker 'Made in USA'...so that's good

 

Though you have to beware, the new thing to do is mark 'Assembled in USA', where the parts are imported and then put together her,

-Brig
GySgt/USMC/0369
RSU-Quantico


"FOR OUR TOMORROWS, THEY GAVE THEIR TODAYS"
RIP
Sgt Jesse 'Jeff Nasty' Balthaser
Sgt John P Huling
Cpl Carlos 'Gilo Monster' Gilorozco
Cpl Stephen C 'Socks' Sockalosky
LCpl Joshua A 'Scottie' Scott
LCpl Jason Lee 'Birdman' Frye
LCpl Nicolas B Morrison
LCpl Jon T Hicks
LCpl Osbrany 'Oz' Montes De Oca
Pvt Lewis T D Calapini
'The SOI 5'

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Yeah, I think the main problem with the Riker mounts is condensation under the glass, which can do a number on metals. True preservationists and museum curators frown on them, but then museums can afford storage drawer units and inert storage supplies than cost thousands of dollars.

 

I've never seen any condensation in any of my rikers in 12 years and 3 states.

 

a small dehumidifier, like those used in display windows at musical instrument stores, can also help...but you're emptying them constantly. Large ones are best, but size can be a problem.

-Brig
GySgt/USMC/0369
RSU-Quantico


"FOR OUR TOMORROWS, THEY GAVE THEIR TODAYS"
RIP
Sgt Jesse 'Jeff Nasty' Balthaser
Sgt John P Huling
Cpl Carlos 'Gilo Monster' Gilorozco
Cpl Stephen C 'Socks' Sockalosky
LCpl Joshua A 'Scottie' Scott
LCpl Jason Lee 'Birdman' Frye
LCpl Nicolas B Morrison
LCpl Jon T Hicks
LCpl Osbrany 'Oz' Montes De Oca
Pvt Lewis T D Calapini
'The SOI 5'

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

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