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Carbine & Pistol Magazine Pouches (Twin Pocket)


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craig_pickrall

That is either a re-dyed pouch or foreign made post war. Can you read a maker name and date?

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craig_pickrall

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind...c=2082&st=0

 

You might try matching it up with other pouches in this thread.

 

The snap is made in provenance, RI not the pouch, is that correct. The snap probably has LTD or just a dimple on the front which is the logo for Lift The Dot.

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Thank you very much for the valuable information, Craig! thumbsup.gif The front snap has no markings but the dot below the opening. I goofed, and failed to mention that the Rhode Island information is on the back disc on the back of the pouch. Based on the information that you've discovered regarding snaps, I believe that this pouch should be a WWII vintage pouch that has been redyed.

 

Thank you very much for the information! thumbsup.gif

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  • 5 months later...

Sorry to necropost - however I just wanted to confirm something.. Is 1943 the latest date that is found on the M1923 Pistol Magazine pockets? No 1944-45 and no OD7 manufactured pockets?

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craig_pickrall

That has been discussed here several times but no one has ever come up with any documentation to confirm it. It seems to be the accepted general opinion until someone proves otherwise.

 

You still see WW1 mag pouches in use during Korea and even some during Vietnam. It seems to me you see more WW1 than you do WW2. It looks like the pouches with the M56 slide keepers were the next production run of these pouches.

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Notice these first two pouches do not have the grommets for the M1910 Belt Hook. I think these pouches were made during Vietnam and supplied to irregular troops that were equiped with the Carbine or M1.

 

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I've got a set exactly like the OD ones missing the grommets. They are marked "ALDON 45" under the flap. I'm not sure of their origin, or why they are missing the hooks. I'm assuming the 45 is a 1945 date of manufacture. They were bought in a lot with 2 with grommets and 1957 contract dates.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello, I was wondering if anyone has any info on this ammo pouch. The disk is artillery, but

have no idea as to what the numbers signify. Also, what was the purpose in IDing an item like this. Any value? Thank you,

 

 

dscn4045.jpg

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Your M1919 Equipment Marking Disk is for Battery F. 17th Field Artillery, soldier #17. Soldier #17 would have one of these discs on each piece of his issued individual equipment- cartridge belt, canteen carrier, haversack and etc. It was the marking system adopted after WW1 to replace the stenciling previously put onto individual equipment.

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Your M1919 Equipment Marking Disk is for Battery F. 17th Field Artillery, soldier #17. Soldier #17 would have one of these discs on each piece of his issued individual equipment- cartridge belt, canteen carrier, haversack and etc. It was the marking system adopted after WW1 to replace the stenciling previously put onto individual equipment.

Thanks! That answers that. I appreciate it!

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  • 1 month later...
That has been discussed here several times but no one has ever come up with any documentation to confirm it. It seems to be the accepted general opinion until someone proves otherwise.

 

You still see WW1 mag pouches in use during Korea and even some during Vietnam. It seems to me you see more WW1 than you do WW2. It looks like the pouches with the M56 slide keepers were the next production run of these pouches.

 

My dad has an m1923 pouch dated 1952. Dark od color like that of the m56 pouches almost, and it has a lot of contract or stock numbers stamped on it along with the date. I got it at a gun show for like 5 bucks or something. When i go home net weekend i'll take pictures.

-Jason

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  • 8 months later...

Hello all,

 

Does anyone have any photographic evidence of the M1/M2 carbine mage pouches that are specifically made for use with the 30rd magazines? I am refering the pouch that has two inner sleeves for the mags and an open area in front for extra ammo on stripper clips.

 

I did a quick look through the LIFE images on google and all I saw were the standard 15rd pouches being used, both by GI's with carbines showing 15 and 30rd mags in use.

 

Sorta scratching my head on this one...

 

 

 

Kyle

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craig_pickrall

There are several of these pics around. You just have to look close. The one shown is the only one I already had done. It is from the 187 RCT Unit History and was originally published in LIFE Magazine.

 

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Now that is a neat question. I did a quick look at what few Korean War pictures I have here but saw none in use. If I were looking for such pictures, I think I'd start with the War Baby books.

 

For what it is worth, the guys I've known who carried a carbine in Korea said they used a pair of 30 round mags taped end-to-end, and carried spare 15-round mags in a stock or belt pouch, or in their pockets.

 

Good luck with your search, and please let us know what you find.

 

Jim

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Both Riesch's book and War Baby COmes Home have pictures of the magazine pouches for the 30-round magazine. One version was created by adding an extension piece to the flap. Prior to the Korean conflict a new pouch was designed, followed later by a pouch with divider that would hold 4 magazines or three boxes of ammo. Hope this helps.

 

Mark

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craig_pickrall

This is the type pouches Devious 6 mentions.

 

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A old guy that I know served as a F.O. in Korea and told me he used both the 30 round mags and 15 round mags, he carried his 30 round mags in the top pocket of the 3 pocket grenade pouch. When he told me this the first thing I did when I got home was to see if that worked and they fit like a glove. :thumbsup:

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I looking through the LIFE images on google over the past few days I can say that I definitely saw lots of the 3-cell grenade pouches being used...I'll have to go back and see how many are being used by GI's with carbines.

 

 

Kyle

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Captainofthe7th

I've searched hundreds of Korean War photos and never saw one in use. I'd say the 15 rnd two cell pouches were used the most, including 'stock pouches'! There are a number of pictures with GIs using the 'stock pouch' on their carbine. I have asked vets who carried carbines in Korea if they remember anything like the modified two cell pouch and they say no, just the 'shorter ones' (so the 15 round). Of course, the box pouches were used, as seen above.

 

This isn't to say the modified 2 cells weren't used, but I have no evidence that they ever were seen in Korea. Maybe early Vietnam but I've hardly scratched the surface there.

 

Hope that helps a bit-

 

Rob

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From examples I've seen of the modified two-cell pouches, I get the idea that these were made in the post-Korea era. I've seen the modified pouches with enough of flap left to read the markings. I've seen several that are the late 1950's dated pouch. I'm not sure how long the pouches were being modified for but, they were definitely being modified in the late 1950's, early 60's. More questions...

 

 

Kyle

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Did you ever go back and see how many of the carbines & 3 pocket grenade pouches were together?

post-3273-1268278215.jpg

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