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Was sewing THIS BAD even tolerated!?


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Hey everyone,

 

I've started buying 1950's Class A coats again, because I finally found some wool serge pants to wear them with last week. Today I found one, dated 1959, in my exact size of 40R! I couldn't say no!

 

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It belonged to an 84th Division Private. But I immediately noticed the sewing quality. It's not bad; it's horrible. :blink:

 

(Note: Those aren't moth holes, just dirt in the mirror. The coat itself is mint.)

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As you can see, the private ranks aren't even sewn on straight! They're bent as well! In addition, the 84th patch is placed a bit too low. The sewing technique to attach them wasn't the greatest either, however, my WWII service coat has its patches sewn using that method. Then again it looks better.

 

Another interesting thing I noticed...The private stripes weren't always private stripes - they used to be of a higher rank, but the rest of the patch was cut off, leaving the top chevron.

 

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My question is...how did anyone even get away with this! I don't think that this would've passed inspection even in WWII, where patches were sewn all over the place. The patches are period - the 84th Div patch has an olive drab border, like patches used for Ike Jackets at this time. The rank stripes as well as the unit patch are cut edge. It looks so bad I plan to remove them and re-sew them on myself. Because I can do a way better job.

 

Also, what would I need to complete this uniform? Would it be okay with just US and Infantry collar disks? Or do I need to add a badge and maybe unit crest? Please say I don't need unit crests, those are hard to find...in addition I couldn't find any evidence of crests ever being on the coat - there are no pin holes in the shoulder loops.

Postwar uniforms are sharp as hell, but once you don't want 'em, they're hard to sell.

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Yes my young friend, I'll go out on a limb and say this was added, both are Hand Sewn, and are way way off. Something this off kilter was something one would really see on a WWII ETO Combat soldiers M41 or M43 Field Jacket, in combat or just out of the line.

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I have a horribly sewn WWII class A jacket and used to have another one. Researched the names and the rank and insignia was correct. They were just bad at sewing

RIP Private Lester H. Scheaffer, 1913 - 1944. 29th Infantry Division, 175th Infantry Regiment, Company F. Killed In Action September 12th, 1944 in France

 

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And while I concur that the insignia on the coat the OP posted is just too far off. I have seen a few class A's with patches glued on, yes glued. Not iron-on or stitched.

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I have a horribly sewn WWII class A jacket and used to have another one. Researched the names and the rank and insignia was correct. They were just bad at sewing

Good point, I too have a few, but in these cases these were discharged Soldiers. This coat here is giving the presumption of a serving Army Reservist of the 84th Training Division circa 1960s, highly doubt this would pass the ever seeing eye of his NCOs, given that these troops from this kind of Division cadred Basic and AIT courses as part of their Drills and would need to be turned out squared away.

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His platoon sergeant would surely bust his a** if he turned up on parade looking like that!? :o I think it's a bad attempt at restoration by an "amateur"!

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At my NCO appointment ceremony, one of the other appointees showed up with his new chevrons stapled on his shirt!

 

 

 

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I bought a 60s Army Green, Class A coat one time, which was missing its Specialist's ranks and BRO patch...easily identifiable as such because of the dried glue stains where they once were! I later acquired appropriate period patches which I had properly sewn in their place.

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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I personally witnessed an Airman 3rd Class get busted back to Airman Basic on the spot because one of the squadrom training NCO' s spotted glue residue around one of his chevrons. This was on a fatigue shirt too. After the stripes were ripped off the airmans sleeves, he had this really sheepish look on his face and it was kinda hard not to laugh at him.

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Such interesting stories...wait someone really went down three ranks because of that!?

 

Anyways, I removed the insignia because there is no way I'd ever keep it the way it was. It just looks so bad. I'm planning to re-sew them by hand because I'm kinda good at sewing patches now. And I do a pretty neat job. Would someone have been able to use hand-sewn patches?

 

Furthermore, would it have been possible to use these weird cut-off Private stripes, or should I replace them with proper ones?

Postwar uniforms are sharp as hell, but once you don't want 'em, they're hard to sell.

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I would use proper PFC chevrons. Such an item could easily have been purchased on base.

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Yeah but they're rather sloppy because they were cut off from a higher-ranking patch...and whoever did, didn't really do a good job. Also, hand sewn insignia would have been tolerated, right?

 

I do a decent job - here's a sample of my needlework...

 

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Postwar uniforms are sharp as hell, but once you don't want 'em, they're hard to sell.

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Yeah but they're rather sloppy because they were cut off from a higher-ranking patch...and whoever did, didn't really do a good job. Also, hand sewn insignia would have been tolerated, right?

 

Yes, of course hand-sewn insignia is perfectly acceptable and to be honest, I'm sure the insignia on the coat was original. First of all, who would "restore" an Army Green uniform from a reserve unit in the 1960's?? You have basically taken something that was almost certainly authentic and turned it into what you think it should look like.

 

The 84th Division was a reserve unit when that coat was worn, which means the soldier probably wore the coat about once or twice a year. And lets face it, he was a Private, so he may not have taken the care in assembling his uniform that a soldier of a higher rank might. Just because he's in the Army doesn't make him Audie Murphy. And the cut-down chevrons aren't wierd or improper either. He either got busted or his unit didn't have the right chevrons to issue him.

 

The glue residue left on uniforms from removed patches is usually just from having the glue backing of the insignia melting during cleaning and pressing, not an attempt by the soldier to glue the insignia on. Although I have also seen insignia that was glued on. In fact, I've got an example in collection of a DBDU coat all the insignia glued on, and from a member of the 82d Airborne Division too. Horrors!

 

FYI: the single chevron was actually Private First Class until 1968 when it became Private/E-2.

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Yes, of course hand-sewn insignia is perfectly acceptable and to be honest, I'm sure the insignia on the coat was original. First of all, who would "restore" an Army Green uniform from a reserve unit in the 1960's?? You have basically taken something that was almost certainly authentic and turned it into what you think it should look like.

 

The 84th Division was a reserve unit when that coat was worn, which means the soldier probably wore the coat about once or twice a year. And lets face it, he was a Private, so he may not have taken the care in assembling his uniform that a soldier of a higher rank might. Just because he's in the Army doesn't make him Audie Murphy. And the cut-down chevrons aren't wierd or improper either. He either got busted or his unit didn't have the right chevrons to issue him.

 

The glue residue left on uniforms from removed patches is usually just from having the glue backing of the insignia melting during cleaning and pressing, not an attempt by the soldier to glue the insignia on. Although I have also seen insignia that was glued on. In fact, I've got an example in collection of a DBDU coat all the insignia glued on, and from a member of the 82d Airborne Division too. Horrors!

 

FYI: the single chevron was actually Private First Class until 1968 when it became Private/E-2.

Yes I am aware of all that B229, but I still think these patches were quickly hand sewn on willy nilly by someone out side of the Army.

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B229 - I know that sometimes soldiers don't always do a good job sewing their insignia, but this was just too far.

 

Patches - The way the insignia was sewn on, the threads did not go through the lining. So I looked at the lining and there seems to have been no previous insignia. Perhaps it was unissued? That would explain the lack of pin holes from collar discs and unit crests.

Postwar uniforms are sharp as hell, but once you don't want 'em, they're hard to sell.

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B229 - I know that sometimes soldiers don't always do a good job sewing their insignia, but this was just too far.

 

Patches - The way the insignia was sewn on, the threads did not go through the lining. So I looked at the lining and there seems to have been no previous insignia. Perhaps it was unissued? That would explain the lack of pin holes from collar discs and unit crests.

And there are no stamped Serial Numbers or a name correct?

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Yes I am aware of all that B229, but I still think these patches were quickly hand sewn on willy nilly by someone out side of the Army.

 

Or quickly hand-sewn on willy nilly by some hapless PFC who forget he was supposed to wear his greens for drill this month!

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