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Garand Grenade Launcher Adapter


GI 44
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I've had this MkII frag grenade launcher adapter for a few years now but it has always been one of those things that I've never been sure of. Whether it's original or repro. I imagine your first thoughts were the same as mine. It looks too new to be repro. But there have been items that turn up in large quantities from time to time out of old US wartime stocks in various European countries left after the war. The construction is very good and I can't find any differences from other known original examples I've seen.

 

Can anyone who is familiar with these give me their educated opinion?

 

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Cheers

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Bob Hudson

Did they actually make repros of those? Seems hard to believe since it would quite expensive to fabricate and there would not seem to be a big market for them.

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With the exception of the type of screws and the construction of the top of the tube where the bottom of the grenade sits, yours looks pretty much like my two 1944 dated originals. Mine have no markings stamped into the metal like your does, ie the letter A. And my yellow markings are very different. Not so much ink was used on mine.

 

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Did they actually make repros of those? Seems hard to believe since it would quite expensive to fabricate and there would not seem to be a big market for them.

 

The same thought occurred to me but, they seem to repro everything these days. I find it safer to assume there are repros made of everything and go from there. However, aside from your point about the cost, the need or desire for repros of these doesn't seem great.

 

Robin,

 

Thanks for posting yours. I agree, the construction, screws aside, looks identical. I'm sure there was more than one manufacturer, as with most items. This may also explain the difference in markings.

 

Thanks

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My guess is that you have a restored original.

 

Many, or most of the common M1A1 projection adapters in circulation were converted from original WWII M1 adapters. These have the small "cup" at the top of the tube with three spring clips, not 4. They can often be found with additonal tapped holes in the tube where the original 4 clips were mounted before modification. These M1A1 adapters can be had in the States for as little as $5 each and I've seen M1 adapters sell for over $100. See a profit motive there? All one needs to do is take two of the later type (to provide the additional spring clip), make a new top plate with 4 slots in it, and fill in the holes where the second and third spring clips went on the M1A1 style. Some fresh paint and stencils and you have a much more valuable product.

 

They have been doing that for years in Europe, and the U.S. too, for the M17 fragmentation rifle grenades. Take one of these adapters, or the tail from a smoke rifle grenade, add some threads and an adapter at the top, screw on a WWII Mk2 frag body, and voila.....a $200 plus rifle grenade. Your example looks suspect to me because of the poorly applied markings and the pale OD paint. I've never seen an original WWII M1 adapter that didn't have fairly dark OD paint, and often a brownish shade. If I found a dealer with a number of these, my inclination would be to buy one and strip the paint to see if there were any filled-in screw holes. That is, if it didn't cost me $70 or $80 to prove the point. Just my opinion, though.

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Ordnance,

 

Thanks for your input.

All one needs to do is take two of the later type (to provide the additional spring clip), make a new top plate with 4 slots in it, and fill in the holes where the second and third spring clips went on the M1A1 style. Some fresh paint and stencils and you have a much more valuable product.

 

I can see right to the top of the tube from the bottom and there has only ever been four original holes. I take your point about people modifying post war variants to appear as the more sought after wartime versions. I've seen this with many other US wartime items. However, given you descriptions, this example doesn't appear to follow.

 

In regards to the paint, you'll have to take my word that the OD paint is "correct". It matches, or is close to other unissued items in my collection. The photos don't translate the colour too well. You have a point about the markings being sloppy, but I think that could go either way. Wartime production meant that sometimes these things were not always applied with 100% care.

 

I think this is one of two things, a NOS item or a very good repro. It has no signs of being a modified postwar variant. We're right to be suspicious of "minty" items, especially those not so often encountered. Anyone have any more original examples for comparison?

 

Cheers

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Robin,

 

You comment on the screws got me thinking, and looking closer. To be honest I'm surprised I missed this wee fact. The screws are pozidrive which, according to my references, was Developed in the 1960s. So it would appear I have a well made repro on my hands. Like I said "I find it safer to assume there are repros made of everything". I guess that settles it. ;) Just glad I didn't pay too much for it.

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Hi Chris,

 

I can confirm that they do make repros of these items. And yes, the screws are a dead giveaway (once you realise, that is).

 

Cheers,

Glen.

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Cheers, Glen,

 

Funny how the obvious things can slip by when you're analysing the details.

 

Cheers

 

Chris

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