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DD DDE DDR DESTROYERS Greyhounds of the Fleet


Bearmon
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Salvage Sailor

USS WILLIAM R. RUSH (DD/DDR-714) Gearing class in service 1945 to 1978.  Korean War - Cold War

After her Korean War shore bombardment duty she was converted to a DDR Radar Picket from 1952 to 1965

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1950's DDR Radar Picket Gemsco version

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On 10 April 10 1952 the destroyer USS William R. Rush (DD-714) was docked in Dry Dock 1 at the Boston Naval Shipyard as a part of the yard’s work in converting the vessel into a radar picket destroyer (DDR-714). Rush a Gearing-class destroyer named in honor of the World War I Navy Yard Commandant had decommissioned for conversion in December 1951. This drydocking took place at not quite the mid-point of the work, which was completed in September 1952. Note that the vessel has been shorn of her masts at this point in time. This sequence documents the movement of the ship into the dock. (All images, U.S. Navy photographs, Boston National Historical Park Collection, NPS Cat. No. BOSTS-14719) Note the caisson floating at left as the ship passes the sill of the dock.

 

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Ball Cap patch 1970's

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USS WILLIAM R. RUSH (DD-714) Both Blue & Gold versions of her DD patch circa 1970's

 

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Port broadside view of the USS William R. Rush (DD-714) underway circa 1965 immediately after the completion of her FRAM I conversion. Official US Navy, courtesy commanding officer; 1967-68 Jane’s Fighting Ships.

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Blue Version of (DD-714)

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USS WILLIAM R. RUSH (DD-714) In the Atlantic, September 1965

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Gold Version of (DD-714)

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busternfo

Bearmon post 325.  Beautiful DDR-715 William M Wood patch.  Please tell me the size of this patch.  Thanks,

 

Dennie

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Bearmon
13 hours ago, busternfo said:

Bearmon post 325.  Beautiful DDR-715 William M Wood patch.  Please tell me the size of this patch.  Thanks,

 

Dennie

It is about 7.5 inches tall.  

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  • 4 months later...
Salvage Sailor
On 6/12/2017 at 1:59 PM, Salvage Sailor said:

Rediscovered, I've been sorting out my collection

 

Another version of USS HIGBEE (DD-806)

 

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Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee was born in Chatham, New Brunswick, on 18 May 1874. She completed nurses' training at the New York Postgraduate Hospital in 1899 and entered private practice soon thereafter. In October 1908, she joined the newly-established U.S. Navy Nurse Corps as one of its first twenty members and was promoted to Chief Nurse in 1909. In January 1911, Mrs. Higbee (she was the widow of Lieutenant Colonel John Henley Higbee, USMC) became the second Superintendent of the Nurse Corps. For her achievements in leading the Corps through the First World War, Chief Nurse Higbee was awarded the Navy Cross, the first woman to receive that medal. She retired from the Navy in November 1922. Chief Nurse Lenah H. Higbee died at Winter Park, Florida, on 10 January 1941. Photo #: 80-G-1037198. Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee, (NC) USN, portrait photograph, taken in uniform during the World War I era. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

 

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More from the Pig Pen, USS HIGBEE (DD-806) "The Leaping Lenah", Gearing class in service 1945 to 1979.  

 

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Higbee's Mount 52, destroyed by a North Vietnamese bomb in 1972.

 

On 19 April 1972 Higbee became the first US warship to be bombed during the Vietnam War, when two VPAF (also known as the NVAF-North Vietnamese Air Force) MiG-17s from the 923rd Fighter Regiment attacked, one of which, piloted by Le Xuan Di, dropped a 250 kilogram (500 lb) bomb onto Higbee's rear 5-inch gun mount, destroying it.

 

The 5-inch gun crew had been outside their turret, due to a misfire within the mount, when the air attack occurred, which resulted in the wounding of four US sailors. The second MiG-17 flown by Nguyen Van Bay B (the "B" to differentiate from the more famous ace pilot Nguyen Van Bay).  Higbee was repaired at Subic Bay in the Philippines, with the wrecked gun mount removed, to be replaced later and the structural damage repaired.

 

Although there were no official aircraft losses reported by either side during the aerial attack, witnesses aboard accompanying USN vessel's deploying defensive measures, claimed one of the attacking MiGs with a hit by a surface-to-air missile fired from the cruiser USS Sterett.

 

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USS Higbee (DD-806) under repair in Floating Drydock AFDM-6 at the Ship Repair Facility at Subic Bay, Philippines, circa in May 1972. On 19 April 1972, Higbee became the first U.S. warship to be bombed during the Vietnam War, when two North Vietnamese Air Force Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17s from the 923rd Fighter Regiment attacked, one of which, piloted by Le Xuan Di, dropped a 250 pound bomb onto Higbee's rear 127 mm gun mount, destroying it. The 127 mm gun crew had been outside their turret, due to a misfire within the mount, when the air attack occurred, which resulted in the wounding of four U.S. sailors. U.S. Navy photo from U.S. Navy All Hands magazine October 1972.

 

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