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Restoration of a Glider Waco CG-4A structure.


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Good images!

Merry Christmas to everyone.

 

Mat, if you want to restore your frame authentically, please consider the following,

 

A grey trailing wheel does not make the glider grey. The bottom of the glider was grey. The C-47 trail wheel was grey too.

 

If the CM glider 43-42835 is grey, why does it appear to be light blue in the photo?

 

Because the image was “doctored” for printing purposes for the magazine. Many magazine and newspaper photos were retouched for printing purposes. This glider was the 454th production article by Commonwealth. Other than the Cessna\Boeing contract, most 42 serial number gliders were produced and delivered in 1943. A majority of 43 contract serial numbers were produced and delivered in 1944 between January and middle of August. 45 serial number contract articles were delivered from August 1944 into July-August 1945. There were quite a number of 45 contract serial numbered CG-4A used in Varsity.

 

The 43-42835 glider in the configuration as shown was not contract specification factory production. It shows the original rounded tail cone which had not been field converted to the modified tail cone. It has the deceleration tail chute installed, side mounted because the tail cone is not modified. The glider also has the Cory nose skid system installed. Neither of these items was factory installed when this glider was built and field installation would have occurred generally not before July 1944. That it has the serial number painted on the bottom of the wing and has the large number on the forward cargo section indicates it was assigned to an airfield in the United States. By serial number this glider was not assigned to CCAAF glider engineering test base or to Wright Field. Considering these factors it could have been at Sheppard Field, glider mechanics school. Ernie LaSalle did a lot of different things with the CG-4A in his glider mechanics school. However, the fact that it appears grey or light blue in the magazine printed photo does not indicate or prove it was painted grey.

 

I have responses from six U. S. glider pilots who flew in Europe and one response from a C-47 pilot who did snatch and ground tow recoveries of CG-4A gliders after Market and Varsity missions. He may even have recovered one or more of Gregory’s “light grey” gliders. He saw them on the ground and he saw them from above, flying over them while doing recoveries. He NEVER saw a grey painted CG-4A. These men were there, Gregory was not.

 

Here is a photo that I believe proves Gregory’s point that because the gliders look grey in the photos and appear to be different shades of grey in the photo, they are grey. The uploaded image is a USAAF, Wright Field, photo of one of the XCG-4 delivered to Wright Field by WACO. As proven by Gregory, the glider had black and white horizontal stripes on the rudder, the vertical stabilizer was light grey, the fuselage was lighter grey and the wings were dark grey or perhaps black. Using black and white photos as reference, you should paint your glider grey because that is the appearance in the photos.

 

Personally, if you are not interested in historical accuracy, it does not matter to me what color you paint it, you pick a color. However, this XCG-4 as you see it in grey shades in the photo was not grey. The rudder was red and white stripes. The vertical stabilizer and wings were yellow and the very light grey fuselage was dark blue, yet it appears as light grey as do Gregory’s “grey” gliders.

 

Sorry my image did not post. Will try again.

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24dl9pj.jpg

 

Ta Da! .

 

Mat this may be the glider in the last image you posted. This was at delivery before the dorsal fin was added. Your image was made at Wright Field at a demo show for congressmen,etc circa July 3 or 4 1942 after the CG-4A was accepted even though the release date for news and magazines was Sept 4. Go Olive Drab! Both XCG-4 and the singel XCG-3 were delivered painted in "training" colors, dark blue and bright yellow pluse the red and dark blue stripes on the tail.

 

PS., the glider image you posted above, banking port, landing, is a CG-15A. It has red stripe in the insignia bars which means the photo was made in 1947 after the glider joined the new USAF. The Jeep loading also is a CG-15A. Notice the higher stance and the wide loading platform. Olive Drab!!!!

 

PPS, Of the tire tread examples posted by Gergory, beginning top row, left to right, designs 1,2, 5, and 9 are the most frequently seen in glider photos.

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You can use a free image hosting like http://postimage.org/ and past the Direct Link.

Most common image file formats are jpg and png.

 

For the moment I did not choose something for the color.
I will do that in february or march.
Until that, you can try to convince one either.
Both explanation arguments are very good. ;)

 

To all :
The next step (conditioned by color) is to choose a number and a name for the Glider. Maybe you can Help ?

 

 

 

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Mat

 

If you go Authentic with the color and use Olive Drab, an authentic name would be Dorothy I, a good number would be a Ford or NW 43 contract number built early 1944 (because of the wing spar pin, forged bearing you have).

 

If you go with an unauthentic, make believe grey, name it Gregory's Ghost and dream up any number as it won't matter if it is real.

 

We have not discussed the color of the serial numbers yet and the real color does not go well with grey......

 

Charles Day

National Secretary

NWW2GPA, Inc.

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Gregory's Ghost, I like the joke ^_^ But please don't fight you , it's Christmas soon.

oh gosh, I'm torn between the envy to ask you many things about the gliders and go to sleep.

It is 4am, best is to go to bed...
Many thanks for the time passed to write your detailed answers. ;)

 

 

 

 

 

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I for one think you should do it which color YOU feel is right and what you comfortable with! YOU are the one dropping the cash and time, blood, sweat and tears. I understand you want to make it as close to original as possible but counting rivets and nuts and bolts will drive you crazy. I think if you do that you will burn out and not enjoy it as much! Do what makes you happy and I think I can speak for most here and say we will all enjoy your progress. And if others do not, then maybe they can start their own project and do better... ;)

 

Merry Christmas to all and remember the reason for the season!

Actively collecting:

13th USAAF uniforms and groups/medal groups!

307th BG, 5th BG, 11th BG, 42nd BG

Also looking for:

WWII Far East Air Force uniforms/groups!

Any Pacific Army Air Force Groups to 5th, 7th, 10th, 14th, 20th AAF

Collecting CBI and ATC Pacific Army Air Force groups

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USMF's custom photo resize tool:http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/229816-custom-resize-tool-exclusively-for-the-usmf/




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Yes and the Stearman have the same wheels, like in this ebay ad : http://www.ebay.com/itm/Stearman-Hayes-Brakes-and-wheel-assembly-/290805166020?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43b556afc4

I haven't the tail wheel, but a member in this forum has found some glider parts, with four tail wheels :

 

 

post-7669-1252625223.jpg

 

You had posted in another forum the picture below, is-it from a technical manual ?

 

vzvas9.jpg

 

:)

 

 

 

What's the deal with the guy in the shorts ?

 

Is he having a yard sale ?

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CG-4A gliders are not light gray....you are looking at silver aircraft "dope". Some of these were still in North Carolina in the late 40s........

 

Mat,

 

Here you have one of wartime color photos of light grey CG-4A. More you will find in wartime publications. You will find light grey CG-4A images from various theaters of operation in the archives of majority of US WWII era aviation magazines but not only. Beautiful photographs of the US military gliders were published also by lifestyle, social, social-economical magazines, but also newspapers in their weekend issues with color magazines as an addition to main newspaper. Of non-aviation press nice archives of the US military gliders had, among others, Liberty, New York Herald Tribune, Collier's, Look and many more.

 

Here is light grey Commonwealth CG-4A-CM, s/n 43-42832 manufactured in fiscal year 1943. Majority of the CG-4As used operationally in overseas gliderborne assaults were manufactured in fiscal years 1942 and 1943.

 

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The nature of Olive Drab 613 to fade rapidly (unknown at that time) actually caused the
Medium Green to contrast the Olive Drab rather than soften it. A revision to Spec. 12114,
Technical Order T-07-1-1 of June 1942, allowed Medium Green 612 to replace Olive
Drab altogether. This was a result of the problems encountered with the rapid fading of
the Olive Drab paint,
however, did not become standard practice.


Article courtesy of the New Jersey Aviation Hall of Fame Museum, August 2002

The above emphasis is mine. So, contrary to other opinion, the olive drab paint did fade considerably. The paragraph indicates that although changes were made in (brown) olive drab paint, the use of the newer (green) olive drab shade did not become standard. This was because there was a great abundance of the older (brown) olive drab paint mixture on hand during WWII.

Using a black and white print made from a black and white film negative, there is no way that a shade of grey created on the black and white negative film and the resulting print can be said to be grey rather than any one of many other colors and shades of colors as I previously mentioned. The intensity of light, the surface angle of the subject to the light source, the angle of the camera lense to the subject's various surfaces (including distance in length or width of the subject surface relative to the camera lense) have more to do with a subject appearing to be grey in a black and white exposure than does the subject's actual color.

Using the XCG-4 images as example: the image posted by Mat of the XCG-4s being loaded with troopers (actually USAAF enlisted men at Wright Field) shows an entirely different paint color appearance than the image I posted (also made at Wright Field). I have also an image of one of the XCG-4 in flight (made also at Wright Field) where it looks as though it is entirely black. Three different black and white negative exposures of the same glider paint scheme that appear to be three different paint schemes and colors. And, and, and, all of these exposures were made in less that two months time of one another.

The above excerpt from an article on USAAF paint describes a glider which is is field repaired (to make flyable) for recovery from LZ uses wings from badly faded Olive Drab painted and a newer production less faded olive drab fuselage, results in a huge difference in the shade of grey on the film. The wings are from a glider originally painted with olive drab brown base paint and fuselage from newer less faded olive drab green base paint. The starboard aileron is canted at a different angle from the surface of the wing creating a darker, black, appearance.


As Will m says, there were silver painted gliders in the L-M area in the middle and late 40's. These silver colored gliders were at Wright Field, CCAAF, Bowman, Stout, Sheppard, probably SPAAF and maybe other air fields. Some of these were CG-4A, some CG-15A, one was a PG-2A. However, I doubt very much that any of these were shipped to Europe and none would have been used in combat. The XFG-1s, XCG-14A, XCG-7, XCG-8, TG-5, 6 and 8, other TGs and the 1943 balsa wood XCG-15 model used for simulating a bifurcated tow at Wright Field were all painted silver.

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Hello gliderman1,

 

I understand your thoughts on the "silver" cg's not deploying to combat.....however I believe they did. There was a marked decrease in camouflage following D-Day (to the extent that some units were field ordered to apply camo to their a/c....particularly 9th AAF B-26s and some forward fighter-bomber units.....TCG were even receiving natural metal aircraft.....God forbid!!!!!). The silver dope would have weathered fairly quickly to a dull, gray tone.

 

These are just my thoughts.......and this is one of the more interesting series of post on the forum at present. I would really like to see a CG finished in silver dope.......I do feel that the OD and gray would be much easier to maintain.

The nature of Olive Drab 613 to fade rapidly (unknown at that time) actually caused the
Medium Green to contrast the Olive Drab rather than soften it. A revision to Spec. 12114,
Technical Order T-07-1-1 of June 1942, allowed Medium Green 612 to replace Olive
Drab altogether. This was a result of the problems encountered with the rapid fading of
the Olive Drab paint,
however, did not become standard practice.


Article courtesy of the New Jersey Aviation Hall of Fame Museum, August 2002

The above emphasis is mine. So, contrary to other opinion, the olive drab paint did fade considerably. The paragraph indicates that although changes were made in (brown) olive drab paint, the use of the newer (green) olive drab shade did not become standard. This was because there was a great abundance of the older (brown) olive drab paint mixture on hand during WWII.

Using a black and white print made from a black and white film negative, there is no way that a shade of grey created on the black and white negative film and the resulting print can be said to be grey rather than any one of many other colors and shades of colors as I previously mentioned. The intensity of light, the surface angle of the subject to the light source, the angle of the camera lense to the subject's various surfaces (including distance in length or width of the subject surface relative to the camera lense) have more to do with a subject appearing to be grey in a black and white exposure than does the subject's actual color.

Using the XCG-4 images as example: the image posted by Mat of the XCG-4s being loaded with troopers (actually USAAF enlisted men at Wright Field) shows an entirely different paint color appearance than the image I posted (also made at Wright Field). I have also an image of one of the XCG-4 in flight (made also at Wright Field) where it looks as though it is entirely black. Three different black and white negative exposures of the same glider paint scheme that appear to be three different paint schemes and colors. And, and, and, all of these exposures were made in less that two months time of one another.

The above excerpt from an article on USAAF paint describes a glider which is is field repaired (to make flyable) for recovery from LZ uses wings from badly faded Olive Drab painted and a newer production less faded olive drab fuselage, results in a huge difference in the shade of grey on the film. The wings are from a glider originally painted with olive drab brown base paint and fuselage from newer less faded olive drab green base paint. The starboard aileron is canted at a different angle from the surface of the wing creating a darker, black, appearance.


As Will m says, there were silver painted gliders in the L-M area in the middle and late 40's. These silver colored gliders were at Wright Field, CCAAF, Bowman, Stout, Sheppard, probably SPAAF and maybe other air fields. Some of these were CG-4A, some CG-15A, one was a PG-2A. However, I doubt very much that any of these were shipped to Europe and none would have been used in combat. The XFG-1s, XCG-14A, XCG-7, XCG-8, TG-5, 6 and 8, other TGs and the 1943 balsa wood XCG-15 model used for simulating a bifurcated tow at Wright Field were all painted silver.

 

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Hi Will m,

 

With all due respect, I have never seen or heard of a change order to the manufacturers changing the paint from olive drab to silver. The man who was the CG-4A Project Manager at Wright Field in the Glider Branch says he never heard of such a change in paint and those gliders painted silver were over painted in the field, after delivery in olive drab.

 

Of seven glider pilots who responded to my inquiry, five were combat pilots variously from Normandy to Varsity. The five say they never saw a CG-4A painted anything except olive drab. One of the seven was instructor and never left the states. He remembers seeing a (one) silver, not grey, CG-4A here in the states.

 

The other of the seven thinks he remembers seeing a silver CG-4A. He never went overseas. He was badly injured in a powered aircraft accident and spent almost a year in hospital, missing Normandy, Southern France, Market and Varsity as flown by many of his Glider pilot graduating class.

 

The XPG-2A, converted at Sheppard by Ernie LaSalle was painted silver at Sheppard. That CG-4A was built by Ford at Kingsford (Iron Mountain). It was delivered as a CG-4A in Olive Drab. More than one author has written that Ford built that PG-2A. This error stating Ford built a PG-2A is the result of lack of research and it is the result of one author reading, assuming, then repeating without prime research. There are several B&W prints of this glider at Sheppard and CCAAF, setting and flying, one with RATO.

 

Capt Lee Jett was commander of a War Bond Drive, glider/jumper demonstration team. Jett was a trained P-40 pilot who was sent to Wright Field as a test pilot and was assigned to the Glider Branch. His duties in the Glider Branch put him at CCAAF glider test field. There he flew the Stinson, the C-47 and the B-17 aircraft used in developing the human snatch and the glider snatch systems and technique. From late 1942 through 1946 he flew well over 2,000 snatches. His two main glider pilots for these demonstrations were John Bryant and Jackie Coogan. They flew silver painted CG-4A gliders. These were over painted, delivered by factories in Olive Drab. There are pictures of these gliders with the Troop Carrier Command (Stout Field) emblem on the side of cockpit. One in particular has a large 60 on leading area of cargo section. That I recall, all of the CG-4A that I know were painted silver had the TCC (Stout Field) emblem on the sides of the cockpit. None of these were delivered in silver. They were field, over paints.

 

The cotton aircraft fabric used on the CG-4A had to be doped to shrink and tighten it and then painted. It had to be painted and Olive Drab was the contracted color. Aluminum aircraft did not have to be painted. It was weather proof, painted or not. I am not sure how critical a factor it was in deciding to not paint aluminum aircraft, but the total weight added by the paint was seriously considered. The option of paint or not was not available to the CG-4A. They had to be painted. Gliders shipped overseas were finished, accepted by the AAF and crated for overseas at the manufacturer. I would have to see a change order to all or some of the glider manufacturers to paint silver (aluminum) color instead of Olive Drab before I would believe any CG-4A were factory painted and shipped overseas in silver.

 

There is no question that TGs and the for-mentioned CGs and the PG were painted silver. However, I maintain that the interpretation of black and white prints of CG-4A gliders being painted silver or grey in Europe is a misinterpretation and misunderstanding of light and light reflection and the resulting exposure of black and white film.

 

Charles Day

Nat. Sec., NWW2GPA, Inc.

 

Check out the NWW2GPA web site (It has nothing to do with paint).

 

http://www.ww2gp.org/index.php

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(....)The XFG-1s, XCG-14A, XCG-7, XCG-8, TG-5, 6 and 8, other TGs and the 1943 balsa wood XCG-15 model used for simulating a bifurcated tow at Wright Field were all painted silver.

 

Like these TG-6 :

 

1962746.jpg

http://www.airliners.net/photo/Taylorcraft-G-100-TG-6/1962746/M/

 

440081.jpg

http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/photo/000440081L.html

 

taylorcraft_tg-6.jpg

http://www.aviastar.org/air/usa/taylorcraft_tg-6.php

 

 

I did a comparison between the different pictures in the thread, TG6 in silver/grey color and CG-4A in unknown color or grey.

 

 

Comp_color_CG4A_TG6.JPG

 

 

Like will m. said it's a very interesting series of post, thanks for your participations.

But I'm really lost for the choice of color...

 

Without certainty for the grey color and because gliderman1 has a good argumentative, green color will be best choice.

But comparison gave me some doubts.

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Matt,

The CG-4A being loaded with litters is the #60 I wrote of above. The pilot standing by, observing, is F/O John S. Bryant. The back edge of the 6 is just in front of him (crotch area) and the glider was painted silver. The star of the comparison is that the comparison spot on the fuselage of the XCG-4 at bottom right was dark blue. I do not know the color or paint scheme of the RCAF CG-4A on top right. It may have been painted in British camoflage browns and greens similar to the Hotspur. However, for sure, it was delivered in Olive Drab.

 

Consider that the surface of the TGs fuselages, the CG-4A fuselage sides and sides of cockpit are not flat but on differnt planes because of the ribs.. Becasuse of the slightly different angles caused by these different planes and even the curvature of the top of the wings, the light intensity, the type of light and the reflection angle to camera is different in all these images. As well, one or two of the images are color and likely digital where the others are black and white film and print, so one can not assume the light color surfaces actually match and are grey or silver painted because they appear to be grey in the B&W film/prints.. .

 

Charles Day

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Happy new (green) Year ! :)

 

I have a load adjuster that I bought some years ago on ebay (low price).
Could give me informations about the name ? Or better, the glider in link with the pilote or the load adjuster ?

Somebody which has a good reputation on the subject, told me that this pilote or soldier's name doesn't exist. So for the moment, I think this marking is a fake.

 

 

P9015372.JPG

 

P9015374.JPG

 

 

P9015371.JPG

 

 

News about the glider :

I moved the frame in an hangar of a flying club, who gave me their help .

So I can restart the restoration in good conditions.

 

 

1507997_1433954940154686_2072448635_n.jp

 

 

Mat

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Matt,

 

Each CG-4A load adjuster was assigned to a specific glider. It was not assigned to a person. It had nothing to do with a C-47. Glider pilots were assigned to Troop Carrier, not Airborne such as 504 parachute infantry regiment. There were three glider pilots named Young but none was a 1Lt per our records. None of them used only the J. initial for his given name.

 

This man may have been PIR but he was NOT glider pilot. Glider riders loaded the gliders. Thus this man may have adopted this slide rule. However, proper load and balance was the reponsibility of the pilot.

 

Is there anything on the reverse side of the card such as the original information such as glider serial number and CG of that glider?

 

Charles Day

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  • 2 weeks later...

I never tried to remove it.

Nothing more is written. The paper used as support is a piece of an old mailing envelope.

Thanks for your answer Charles Day.

 

Maybe one day someone will find more information about this load adjuster...

 

---

 

I started a list of all Waco restoration project, I found 23 around the world and few unsure.

If anybody knows others projects, feel free to tell me.

 

I collect information in order to do same for the restored gliders Waco.

 

 

 

List of restoration projects Waco glider in the world:

 

France (x7) :

- Jean-Baptiste Salis/Musée Airborne Sainte-Mère(Finished 1964)

http://www.airbil.com/ajbs/Jean-Baptiste/Html Jean-Baptiste/Jean-Baptiste 040D.html

- Les diables rouges 508th PIR 82ND Airborne Vendee

https://www.facebook.com/LesDiablesRouges508thPir82ndAirborneVendee?fref=ts

- Le musée du Muy

http://airborne-task-force-museum.com/fr/waco-cg4a-glider.html

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.274386785930112.58056.251521034883354&type=3

- Le Mitan, Le Muy (Stèle/Memorial)

http://groundhogwalking.co.uk/?page_id=537

- (Secret)

http://forum.armyairforces.com/Searching-parts-for-Glider-WACO-CG4A-m186347.aspx

- Picauville's Brothers (rumor since 20 years)

No links

- Glider-borne (us ;-))

https://www.facebook.com/Gliderborne

 

Belgique / Belgium (x2):

- Bastogne Barracks

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bastogne-Barracks/134785443282088

- JIM RIKE'S CG-4A RESTORATION PROJECT

http://users.telenet.be/airwareurope/en/waco/waco_rike_e.htm

 

Pays-Bas / Netherlands (x1) :

- Wolfheze Museum https://www.facebook.com/pages/WACO-CG-4A-Project-Wolfheze/540288929394679?ref=stream

 

Royaume-Uni / United Kingdom (x2):

- Cumbria's Military Museum

http://wacoreconstruction.wordpress.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cumbrias-Military-Museums-Waco-Glider-Project/124524734337624?fref=ts- The Assault Glider Trust at RAF Shawbury (Finished year ?)

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Assault-Glider-Trust/47904435934

http://www.assaultglidertrust.co.uk/content/News.html

 

Etats-Unis / United States (x11):

- Dover Air Mobility Command Museum

http://amcmuseum.org/exhibits_and_planes/cg-4.php

http://www.flickr.com/photos/massey_aero/7287618040/

- The Menominee Range Historical Foundation (Fini/finished year 2011)

http://www.menomineemuseum.com/glider.htm

- All-bull on usmilitariaforum.com

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?%2Ftopic%2F54107-waco-cg-4a-glider-frame%2F

- Waco Museum Aviation Learning Center, Troy, OH(CG-15A)

http://www.warbirdsandairshows.com/warbirdsightings.htm

- Fighting Falcon Military Museum Greenville MI (?)

http://www.thefightingfalcon.com/the-glider.php

- Whiteman Air Force Base

http://www.442fw.afrc.af.mil/pressreleases/story.asp?storyID=123072507

http://www.442fw.afrc.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123292373

- Lago vista texas (For sale since 2009 - $1500)

http://g503.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=83&t=132728

- Syltech Hyde Park, NY

http://www.syltech.net/ourwork.htm

- Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum Columbus, Indiana

www.atterburybakalarairmuseum.org/pr01.htm

- Questmasters (1 + 2 cockpits)

http://www.questmasters.us/CG-4A.html

- Yanks Air Museum, Chino, CA, USA.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tailspin_tommy/1465412728/in/photostream/

 

 

Undetermined (x3):

http://silentwingsmuseum.org/

http://www.airbum.com/articles/ArticleWACOGliderCG-4A.html

http://lostinjersey.wordpress.com/2009/03/22/the-glider-in-the-woods/

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The Silent Wings Museum, if this is the same outfit that used to be just outside of Dallas, had a restored glider years ago.

 

The National WWII Museum in New Orleans had the front of a glider with the front raised and disgorging a loaded Jeep as one of their D-Day exhibits.

Gil Burket
Omaha, NE
Specializing in Fakes and Reproductions
of the Vietnam War

burkcats@hotmail.com

 

"One is easily fooled by that which one loves."

 

Moliere: Tartuffe

 

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Thanks gwb 123,

 

New part for the projet, the instrument panel :

Glierborne_instrumentPanel.JPG

 

 

I started to make one with spare instruments...

Gliderborne_instrumentpanel_set.JPG

 

We still need the structure of cockpit, it necessarily exists one that isn't in a museum and that we can use.

If you know one, feel free to contact us at contact(at)gliderborne.com

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Must rate as the world's biggest construction kit!! Absolutely fascinating...and what an undertaking!

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender!"

 

Winston Churchill

" Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans."

John Winston Lennon

 

 

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Not sure but for me, it's the same as BT-13 Stearman, AT-6 Texan, N2s-3 Navy...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/27-T-6-BT-13-Stearman-Wheel-Hayes-WWII-Aircraft-Warbird-Part-/161185993982?pt=Motors_Aviation_Parts_Gear&vxp=mtr&hash=item25876f14fe&nma=true&si=VYmA4nblUjlBGIZ0NAoM%252F%252BkWfew%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Stearman-Hayes-Brakes-and-wheel-assembly-/290805166020?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43b556afc4

 

I found in normandy a parts of the brake system of these airplanes... I didn't understand why until I see that it's the same system on a Glider Waco.

 

 

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Sure Sabrejet, and it's funny to do ! ^_^

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Or you could be lucky like I was and find the whole wheel assemblies used as an axle for a wooden cart that was built at RAF Burtonwood for transporting engines around at the BAD1 airbase there....! ;)

 

Got 5 CG-4A wheels from there, still have 3 of them, the other two were sold to Michel Clements (Clements Trading) 3 or so years ago.

 

Also have the two upper-corner canopy replacement aluminium sheets that were trailled at BAD1 at one point. Mind you, they also trialled a powered CG-4A there, with two small engines fitted to the wings. Why, I have no idea....!

 

Cheers,

Glen.

2nd Armored in Europe : http://www.2ndarmoredineurope.co.uk

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