Jump to content

Infantry Shako Plate 1812-1815


Recommended Posts

This infantry shako plate was dug at Ft. Mims, Alabama. Ft. Mims was destroyed by British and Indian forces. They slaughtered every man, woman and child at the fort, which resulted in General Andrew Jackson forming an expedition that came south and defeated the Red Sticks at Horse Shoe Bend which ended the Creek Indian wars. General Jackson then went on to New Orleans where he defeated the British forces which was the last battle of the war of 1812.

post-6022-0-80657100-1384466893.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! Is this your plate? That is fantastic! When I was stationed at Pascagoula, I wanted to see the site but never made the time.

I do not profess to be a militaria expert, but I conduct as much research as I am capable of and then write about my findings.
Check out my blogs, The Veteran's Collection (general militaria) and Chevrons and Diamonds (military baseball)

donation2011.gifdonation2012.gif

donation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif


Link to post
Share on other sites

Incredible piece and nearly intact, superb for a ground dug piece and I if I recall correctly these are pewter which is fragile in itself. Wonderful piece of American History. Thank you for showing and thank you Forum for adding the 19th C. section.

 

Terence in Colorado

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gif

Seeking Model 1895 and 1902 Named Officer coats as well as Spanish American War Tropical Uniforms.
Also pre WW2 marine uniforms. Always pre-1945 Colorado National Guard Items wanted! Also seeking Rhodesian

Uniforms and Gear used by Americans in the Rhodesian Security Forces during the Bush War (Africa).

 

Fortune cookie say: "An expert is someone that knows so much about so little."

Link to post
Share on other sites

That is an exceptional piece of history.

 

Thank you for sharing it.

RC

"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

*Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia"*

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gif
donation2016.gifdonation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

A really nice piece! When I was at Benning in the 80s, I went to visit Horseshoe Bend Park. At that time it was a beautiful park, and from its website, it appears that little has changed. While the War of 1812 is not the most studied war, with most history books focusing on the war in the east, the war in south is even less studied. One book that I enjoyed was STRUGGLE FOR THE GULF BORDERLANDS by Frank Owsley..

 

Thanks for posting!

donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif
donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif



" We sleep safe in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. "

View my website honoring the men and women of Indiana: http://indianavets.wix.com/indiana-at-war and follow my updates on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/IndianaModernAgeofWar/
Interested in US uniforms? Join the Association of American Military Uniform Collectors! http://aamuc.org/or find us on Facebook! facebook.com/AAMUC.ORG

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A really nice piece! When I was at Benning in the 80s, I went to visit Horseshoe Bend Park. At that time it was a beautiful park, and from its website, it appears that little has changed. While the War of 1812 is not the most studied war, with most history books focusing on the war in the east, the war in south is even less studied. One book that I enjoyed was STRUGGLE FOR THE GULF BORDERLANDS by Frank Owsley..

 

Thanks for posting!

Horseshoe Bend hasn't changed. What I like most about that battle field is you can stand on the spot where Andrew Jackson fielded his cannon and see the entire battle field, not like Civil War battle fields where you have to imagine what took place. I would highly recommend that anyone coming to Alabama visit this site if you like military history. I am fortunate to have several War of 1812 battle sites and forts within a few miles of my home which has given me hours of pleasure searching the area.

Terry

Link to post
Share on other sites

Terry,

Really cool piece!

 

Did you find it yourself or purchase it from someone local?

 

thanks for showing it!

 

Kim

 

Kim,

They were doing some work at the old fort site and were taking loads of dirt and dumping it a few miles away. It was in this dirt that the plate was found along with a number of buttons and some mini balls.

Terry

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 9 months later...

What type of metal is this plate? Pewter,tin,or brass? Thank you

Regards,

 

Michael Sweeney--Researcher and Collector of WW2 77TH Division

If you have any named items to a 77th Division Soldier please contact me!!!

 

In memoroy of my Grandfather

Eugene Henry Sweeney

1st Lieutenant of the 306th

Infantry Regiment Company L -

Veteran of Guam and Leyte

 

 

donation2008.gifdonation2009.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume this plate has the variant attachment on the reverse as I do not see any holes in this plate for attachment to a shako....

Regards,

 

Michael Sweeney--Researcher and Collector of WW2 77TH Division

If you have any named items to a 77th Division Soldier please contact me!!!

 

In memoroy of my Grandfather

Eugene Henry Sweeney

1st Lieutenant of the 306th

Infantry Regiment Company L -

Veteran of Guam and Leyte

 

 

donation2008.gifdonation2009.gif

donation2010.gifdonation2011.gifdonation2012.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I assume this plate has the variant attachment on the reverse as I do not see any holes in this plate for attachment to a shako....

 

It appears to be pewter, certainly not brass. If you notice the two holes in the front of the plate that's where the attachment prongs were attached. Based on other period plates I suspect that they were just long wires or prongs that were poked through the front of the shako.

Terry

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.