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Vietnam US NAVY Brown Water Shirt


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Hello,

 

I received today this jacket I bought on Ebay, even it looks suspicious, I bought it just for my curiosity (thanks for the strong Euro). The jacket has few wierd caracteristics. With the first examination, every patches... were sewn longtime ago (even there was a shadow of the removed patch on the left sleeve, there was a previous tape before the NAVY tape), the thread looks right.

 

- I'm not used with NAVY ranks, but I think the NAVY sailors didn't use this kind of rank, since they were made in Blue material.

- The name tape and the NAVY tape are made in the soft poplin material, the embroidery are very crude (look like machine made)

- There are 2 pleats sewn on the front crossing the pockets, and 3 on the back, do any one know if these modifications are regulated in the NAVY (or other braches ... ) ?

 

Thanks for your help

 

Cheers

post-1523-1209593063.jpg

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The tapes,

 

Thanks for your opinion.

 

If you think the jacket is legit, could someone help me to seek forthe service of this Vet ?

 

Thanks a lot

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post-1523-1209593304.jpg

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Yes, WWII US Army Corporal stripes on a shirt with a USN namestrip from the 60's would be a bit suspicious.

 

There would also be hundreds of people with the name Hill. You won't have any luck trying to isolate a vet to research without a full name or a service number. .

 

Kurt

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If there s one thing I can be sure, it s the Corporal ranks were sewn on the jacket at the beginning (but the sleeves pen pockets are not seen on ARMY shirt, only on USAF or NAVY)

 

Thanks for your opinion Kurt

 

Yes, WWII US Army Corporal stripes on a shirt with a USN namestrip from the 60's would be a bit suspicious.

 

There would also be hundreds of people with the name Hill. You won't have any luck trying to isolate a vet to research without a full name or a service number. .

 

Kurt

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GIl Sanow

The sewn pleats and sleeve pockets, along with this style chevrons tell me this shirt was modified in Korea. I think the present nametapes were added later.

 

I fear it is an Army shirt with Navy additions.

 

G

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The sewn pleats and sleeve pockets, along with this style chevrons tell me this shirt was modified in Korea. I think the present nametapes were added later.

 

I fear it is an Army shirt with Navy additions.

 

G

 

I am going to agree with my cousin Gil.

 

I am sure I have seen US Army shirts from the 1950's modified with the pen pocket on the shirt. And the tailoring would have been from either Korea or Japan.

 

If you think the stripes were on the shirt first, the name tapes were probably added later.

 

Plus I believe that style of chevron would be right for the 1950's.

 

The only other possible explanation would be a Navy EM serving on a US Army post and wearing equivilant rank. But I am thinking that is very unlikely.

 

One thing to look for is if the pleats of the shirt have worn into the tapes. Overtime, you would be able to see the crease from the pleats on the front of the name and USN tape. If they are smooth, they probably they have been added on.

 

Also, it was not unusual in the early 1950's in the US Army for troops to wear fatigue shirts with just rank and no name or US Army tapes. Without the name and USN tapes, this probably a fine period example of a locally tailored shirt.

 

And finally... the embroidery on these is horrible. Any tailor that could put such sharp pleats into a shirt like this could do a better job with embroidering the name and USN tape.

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Thank you for all your comments, the shirt was purchased for 20 Euros with S&H to France, I was not crazy to put more money on it.

 

I look again under the the tapes, I think that at the begining, there was only the US ARMY Tape, no nametape, the guy removed the US ARMY tape and put the name tape and the US Navy tape on.

 

I took a picture of the sleeve patch shadow, could someone tell me what could be the patch if we suposse that the guy was stationned in Asia (Japan or Korea)

 

About the pleats, was there any regulation about them or it was just the fashion. If someone has a picture, would you please post it.

 

Thanks a lot

 

Cheers

 

Hope you didn't pay much for it, like less that $10.00 US.

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I agree... the old Military Government of Korea with the added KMAG tab below it.

 

I think you could restore this shirt and have a nice period item. This is a time period that gets ignored by many collectors.

 

I would just keep notes on what changes or restorations that you make.

 

I believe the pleats were more of a fashion thing than anything governed by regulation. The uniform shirts of that time were notoriously baggy. "Professional" soldiers had their uniforms tailored for a tighter appearance. Of course this was more likely worn in a garrison environment rather than out in the field.

 

If this soldier was attached to the Military Government, there was a good chance he was working directly with local nationals. All the more reason for him wanting his uniforms to look sharp.

 

I like this item, now that we know what it is.

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Gil

 

Thank you for your help. I think I would stripe the Navy and name tapes. I wonder if I must put the silky black and yellow US Army instead, is it the right era tape ?

 

I start looking to buy the KMAG patch.

 

Cheers

 

 

I agree... the old Military Government of Korea with the added KMAG tab below it.

 

I think you could restore this shirt and have a nice period item. This is a time period that gets ignored by many collectors.

 

I would just keep notes on what changes or restorations that you make.

 

I believe the pleats were more of a fashion thing than anything governed by regulation. The uniform shirts of that time were notoriously baggy. "Professional" soldiers had their uniforms tailored for a tighter appearance. Of course this was more likely worn in a garrison environment rather than out in the field.

 

If this soldier was attached to the Military Government, there was a good chance he was working directly with local nationals. All the more reason for him wanting his uniforms to look sharp.

 

I like this item, now that we know what it is.

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Bonjour,

 

Here is some photos from a Korea war (52-53 as for myself) similar modified shirt worn by a Tropical lightning officer, X Corps veteran.

 

2456417913_d96dd246e0.jpg

 

2457245028_0b81254330_o.jpg

 

2457245074_8a0b5cfecc_o.jpg

 

Surpising by its modifications (pleats and very tight), this shirt has a silk made embroidered name tape (yellow on white).

Cheers

 

Valery

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