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S14 Paratroop First Aid pouch


GICOP
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S14PARATROOPPACK.jpg

 

I have just added an S14 to my collection. :)

 

Can anyone answer these questions?

 

Is there a definite list of items carried in an S14 Paratroop First Aid pouch?

 

Would the individual USMC/USN Corpsman fill the pouch with items he knew he would need and then fill out the “Pouch, First Aid, Paratroop, Complete” contents list or was the list completed, given to the Corpsman, and he then filled the pouch according to the list?

 

Many thanks for any help with these questions.

 

Martyn

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  • 3 weeks later...

S14 PARATROOP FIRST AID POUCH now complete with kit

 

The S14 Paratroop First Aid Pouch, used by USMC Paramarines and USMC/USN Corpsmen in the South Pacific

 

Front view of the S14 Paratroop First Aid Kit.

 

S14CLOSED.jpg

 

Rear view

 

S14CLOSEDrearview.jpg

 

Partially opened

 

S14PARTOPENED.jpg

 

Open, showing the individual pockets

 

 

S14OPEN.jpg

 

All of the pockets on the S14 Paratroop First Aid Pouch are individually numbered except for Pocket 13 which is the MD USN surgical kit

 

S14OPENwithcontents.jpg

 

S14 Contents + contents list in clear wallet

 

Pocket 1 2 x Armbands

 

Pocket 1 3 x card Safety Pins size 3 made in AUSTRALIA by Silverspear

 

Pocket 2 1 x Adhesive Plaster tin 11/2” x 5 yds Parke-Davis

 

Pocket 2 2 x Tourniquet, Spanish Windlass type Guyot Bros

 

Pocket 3 2 x box Sulfanilamide Hynson, Westcott & Dunning

 

Pocket 4 2 x box Sulfadiazine Schering

 

Pocket 5 1 x Bay’s Adhesive Plaster tin 3” x 5yds Bay’s

 

Pocket 6 4 x Halazone bottles American Dietaids Co., Inc

 

Pocket 7 1 x Triangular bandage camouflaged Bauer and Black

 

Pocket 7 3 x Large First Aid Dressing Convenience, Inc

 

Pocket 8 7” Bandage scissors Boker

 

Pocket 8 1 x pencil A.W. Faber New York

 

Pocket 8 1 x knife MD USN Camillus

 

Pocket 9 1 x Large First Aid Dressing American White Cross Laboratories, Inc

 

Pocket 9 4 x Plain Gauze Compressed bandage Acme Cotton Products Co., Inc

 

Pocket 10 1 x Wire Splint A, E, Halperin

 

Pocket 10 1 x box Ammonia Inhalants Davis Emergency Equipment Co,. Inc

 

Pocket 11 2 x box Morphine Syrettes E.R. Squibb

 

Pocket 12 1 x Emergency Medical Tag book

 

Pocket 12 2 x box Iodine Swabs Handy Pad Supply Co.

 

Pocket 12 2 x Plain Gauze Bandage 3”x 6yds Bauer and Black

 

Pocket 12 1 x box Sutures Plain-Type A Davis & Geck, Inc

 

Pocket 12 1 x box Sutures Mild Chromic-Type B Davis & Geck, Inc

 

Pocket 13 1 x MD USN Surgical Instruments set George Tiemann & Co.

 

 

All of the surgical instruments shown in the set are individually stamped MD USN and maker marked Tiemann

 

 

 

Picture showing a S14 pouch being worn on Tarawa

 

 

S14TARAWA.jpg

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GICOP,

 

NICE display, must of taken some pretty time to complete.

 

And thank you , for taking the time to explain what goes where. I learned something here, and I'm sure others have too.

 

I think this post will find its rightfull spot in the reference section soon!

 

Regards,

 

Stijn

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GICOP,

 

NICE display, must of taken some pretty time to complete.

 

And thank you , for taking the time to explain what goes where. I learned something here, and I'm sure others have too.

 

I think this post will find its rightfull spot in the reference section soon!

 

Regards,

 

Stijn

 

Hi Stijn

 

Many thanks for your comments

 

Cheers

 

Martyn

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craig_pickrall

Super nice medical kit. That was very difficult to put together, congratulations!

 

Great set of pics showing, assembly, contents, placement, etc.

 

Many thanks.

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  • 6 months later...

Outstanding. My first ebay purchase was an S14 Kit, First Aid, Paratroop. Not as nice shape as I saw in this posting, but rather interesting. I've never found any detailed info on it, but now I know what what the two lift the dot male studs are for!

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Outstanding. My first ebay purchase was an S14 Kit, First Aid, Paratroop. Not as nice shape as I saw in this posting, but rather interesting. I've never found any detailed info on it, but now I know what what the two lift the dot male studs are for!

 

Hi DocRick

 

Nice to meet another owner of an S14 Kit thumbsup.gif

 

Cheers

 

Martyn

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Okay, I think it worked, I tried to post a photo of my S14, Pouch, First Aid, Paratroop, Complete. (Love the military names) Mine is a little different, with the pouch configuration and my straps are not crossed on the back. What are the two things inserted in the loops on the right side of the apron, that look like bicycle inner tubes??

post-4556-1228142140.jpg

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A little insight, according to Osprey WWII Marine Corp book, the S14 was issued to Marine Raider Corpsman and regular corpsman early in the war. I also saw a picture, though unfortunately, I didn't save it, of a medic or beach battalion corpsman embarking onto an LST for the D-Day invasion. The S14 was probably "rigger-made" due to the rarity and differences in them.

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Okay, I think it worked, I tried to post a photo of my S14, Pouch, First Aid, Paratroop, Complete. (Love the military names) Mine is a little different, with the pouch configuration and my straps are not crossed on the back. What are the two things inserted in the loops on the right side of the apron, that look like bicycle inner tubes??

 

Hi DocRick

 

Nice S14 and great to see the variation. thumbsup.gif

 

Here is a picture from Alec S. Tulkoffs “GRUNT GEAR”, the tubing is clearly shown but I still have to get a definite answer to what it was used for. think.gif At a guess I would think extra tourniquet. The rubber tubing shown in my picture came from Ebay UK, not bicycle tubing but a rubber tubing used in electrical work

 

S14GRUNTGEAR.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Martyn

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Makes sense, combat medicine requires a lot of make shift equipment. Another question: Does the surgical set attach to the lift o dot snaps under the large pouch ?

 

It would seem that this kit would be impractical for a line corpsman. It would be difficult to get at things, let alone remember what is where, while on your belly eating dirt. It would seem, and from the pictures I have seen, they would be better used at the front line aid stations.

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Makes sense, combat medicine requires a lot of make shift equipment. Another question: Does the surgical set attach to the lift o dot snaps under the large pouch ?

 

Yes, the MD USN POCKET CASE attaches to the Lift the Dots under the large pouch.

 

Here is a picture showing the MD USN POCKET CASE in place

 

CASEINPLACE.jpg

 

With the case detached, showing the Lift the Dots

 

CASEDETACHED.jpg

 

With the case attached, showing the Lift the Dots

 

CASEOPENATTACHED.jpg

 

Here are a few pictures of the contents of this MD USN POCKET CASE, every piece is stamped M.D. U.S.N. TIEMANN

 

INSTRUMENTSFROMCASE1.jpg

 

INSTRUMENTSFROMCASE2.jpg

 

SCALPELCASE.jpg

 

SCALPELCASEOPEN.jpg

 

Whilst on the subject of MD USN POCKET CASES here are a few more from my collection

 

OTHERSURGICALCASESMDUSN.jpg

 

OTHERSURGICALCASESMDUSNOPENSHOWINGC.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Martyn

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  • 1 month later...

Okay, I've started to fill my S14, going to take a while. I had some of the items already from previous purchases such as battle dressings and gauze rolls. I suppose the surgical kit is going to be the "Holy Grail" to find think.gif Thanks for the information.

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craig_pickrall

In the past the surgical kits have been fairly easy to find. They may be short a couple of components but by the time you buy 2 or 3 kits there should be enough for atleast one complete kit.

 

From my experience and from what a lot of others have said I think the expendable components are the hardest. There were some odd size containers to fit some of these kits that may not have been used with any other kit, those are the things hardest to find.

 

In some of the comments above the tubing for tourniquets was mentioned. Rather than rare this is very common. Today when I go for blood work that is what they use for a quick tourniquet. You can buy this fairly cheaply at medical supply stores. It comes on a reel and they will cut it to any length you like. I bought 50 feet of it a couple of years ago. The only problem is the current stuff is clear and looks exactly like what was in the Vietnam era medic kits. The bag being discussed here has a grey or flat black tubing it appears.

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Okay, I know what you're refering to. When I was a corpsman, we used "penrose drains" as tourniquets for drawing blood or starting IVs. Hollow flat latex tubing, but in a yellow or clearish material. Now I know what to look for. Looking at the B&W photo you posted (which appears to be my style of S14) it appears that there is a little leeway in the stocking of the kit. Lots of companies made the same product under different names so I suppose that a Carlisle, a Johnson & Johnson, or Handy Pad, etc battle dressing could be used in stocking the kit. "Size matters" like you said, some pockets fit certain size packages.

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Craig, thanks for the info about the tourniquet tubing thumbsup.gif

 

DocRick, I tried to get a definitive list for each of the numbered pockets but from what I found out each individual Corpsman/Medic filled out the list after filling the pouch with what he considered he required.

 

As you know several of the pockets are different sizes but are obviously made for certain items i.e. the Battle dressing will not fit in a pocket that will take large and Carlisle sized dressings.

 

All the packs I have listed fit perfectly and the pouch closes cleanly.

 

Best of luck finding the items, they are all out there.

 

Please keep me informed how you get along, looking forward to seeing the finished kit. thumbsup.gif

 

Cheers

 

Martyn

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  • 5 weeks later...

Okay, I'm slowly filling my S14. Question on dating items: I've read about the stock numbers for WWII, post WWII, 1950's, to today such as: XXXXX, X-XXX or XXXXXXX for WWII, X-XXX-XXX for late 1940's to early 50's and NSNXXXX-XXXX-XXXX for late 50's to today. In your research, does this seem accurate? I've seen numerous items with the NSN or hyphenated 7 digit number for sale on ebay as WWII items. Do the sellers not know what they are talking about or is my information incorrect?

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