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kinney co. pilot 3"in


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I suppose some one could say he did not buy that Kinney pilot wing even if he technically did.

 

How could that be? :huh:

 

After winning the auction the original buyer probably thought he had foolishly paid too much and backed out of the trade; therefore, one could say since no money exchanged hands he technically never bought it. :dry:

 

But the story has a happy ending. The seller relisted the wing on eBay as a Buy-it-Now and it has a wonderful new home.

 

I'm happy for the new owner. It's a beautiful badge considered by many to be quite rare and will make a great addition to a fine collection. ;)

 

Cliff

 

 

Not a fan of non payers myself Cliff! It's been happening to me a lot lately! Glad to hear it worked out and found a nice new home!

 

JD

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John,

That's a stunning "hat trick" of Kinney Pilot wings!

 

 

 

Ian,

Nice Kinney-made bracelet! Most likely produced in the late 20's to early 30's.

 

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Here's a couple of smaller (1.5 inch) silver pilot wings by Kinney Co. Likely produced from the same die as the wing mounted on Ian's bracelet depicted in post #19.

 

IMG_4374_crop.jpg

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Russ always makes me feel like a puny wing punk when he starts showing off his stunning collection (thank you sir, can we see another!). :lol:

 

Here is a small 1 inch naval aviator wing.

 

I am still under the impression that Kinney wasn't a manufacturer of wings, but rather a wholesaler, and that Blackinton was likely the source of their stock. If that true or am I mistaken?

 

Patrick

post-1519-0-97156600-1381511888.jpg

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Hello Patrick,

 

That's a terrific little WWI era Naval Aviator badge you've got! It would sure look nice parked next to the full-size USN Aviator badge posted on the previous page!

 

You may be right about the Kinney Company contracting-out the production of their badges to another company, but I don't believe Blackinton was it. I can't back this assumption with any documentation. But I've handled a good number of badges with Kinney Co hallmarks and found they were all manufactured with their own unique pin...and many were outfitted with a unique "U" shaped drop-in catch identical to the one applied to your small USN wing.

 

I think if Blackinton had produced them, they would have used the same style pin and catch commonly found on Blackinton hallmarked wings, but that's not the case. There are several examples of this unique catch, which is almost horseshoe shaped in design, depicted in the previous images. Here's another image...

IMG_4387_crop.jpg

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It may be time (era) thing. Here is the back of my Kinney Co pilot wings. It has the more typical findings that you would see for a "later" vintage wing (or a Blackinton wing).

 

My understanding was that companies like Kinney, Pasquali, Luxenberg, and maybe a few others (I have some very similar pattern wings that have no hallmark) have a fine feathered wing pattern that more closely fits into the Blackinton-type feathering pattern. Sure, there are some variations in the exact design, but when you look at these wings, they all seem to be very close.

 

Based on that, I had always felt that Blackinton had simply been supplying these other companies with stock (including Kinney Co). Maybe over time, the dies and manufacturing processes changed, such that "early" company, like Kinney and Pasquali, were using stock from early Blackinton dies, whilst "later" companies like Luxenberg, were using later Blackinton stock? They don't have to have used all the same exact dies.

In any case, the Kinney Co wings sure are stunning.

post-1519-0-91641500-1381516076.jpg

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Here are a couple of other Blackinton/Kinney/Pasquali/Luxenberg type wings. Neither is hallmarked. One appears to be silver plated brass (but with a fake "STERLING" mark) and the other is a plain gilt wing (no hallmark at all). The gilt one (IIRC) has a plain "C" style catch, the silver one has the typical under catch.

 

 

post-1519-0-16698700-1381516334.jpg

post-1519-0-19819800-1381516345.jpg

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I am with Russ on this one Patrick.

 

Kinney Co had their own dies for their own wings.

They only made full size wings in the 1920's.

 

Blackinton also had their own dies and their pilot wing, which is believed to first have been struck in the 1920's, and

was also supplied to Pasquale, Bond and Luxenberg.

 

Maybe Cliff will chime in, as he has some more specific information on Kinney.

 

Personally I don't think the Kinney and Blackinton Pilot wing badges look even remotely close,

however I do believe they are the two best looking and highest quality of their type ever made.

 

John

 

Kinney left and Blackinton on right

post-12439-0-35024500-1381520471.jpg

post-12439-0-52118200-1381520482.jpg

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I guess everyone has a different opinion but I would say that the Kinney wing and Blackinton wing look more like each other than any other badge looks like either of them. Are they identical twins, certainly not but they share enough of the same traits that if they were humans you would think they came from the same family. For me it's the shoulders that show a family resemblance. Obviously two distinct patterns but sharing similar traits. And I should add that the Blackinton pattern is my all time favorite so I'm quite partial to it so saying something looks like it is a compliment from me. :lol:

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:unsure:

 

John,

 

I can't add much that hasn't already been said other than agree The Kinney Company was a major manufacturer of high school, college. . . and military jewelry - most notably being aviator wings which were made between World War I and World War II. Yes, Kinney owned their own wing badge dies and at no time did they ever contract the production of wings to another company.

 

With regard to the V. H. Blackinton & Company. Probably the only connection between the two companies is that both were located in Provenance, RI, a city which in the early 20th Century was the center of the jewelry industry in the United States. At one time over 200 jewelry manufacturing companies were located there that employed over 7000 people.

 

BTW, I'm very envious of the beautiful wings and bracelet you, Russ, Patrick and Ian have shared with us in this forum.

 

Many thanks,

 

Cliff ;)

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