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Waited 34 years for a "Junk Room"


17thairborne
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Everything seems to be coming along nicely with that Sten build! How prevalent was it's us with the 139th (or 17th AB for that matter)? On a similar note in the Timberwolf Tracks the 104th Div history it mentions the 104th's 5th platoon troops using Stens.

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Thanks. I am sort of at a standstill until I purchase the new guts (bolt, springs, op rods etc). Once done with that I can weld and refinish, then wait for Form 1 for the barrel.

 

The use of British weapons was not prevalent at all. It was more anecdotal if anything. There are a few documented examples of troops using British Stens, just as some of the guys used an StG 44 or the like. I suspect as with your historical mention of Stens in the 104th, there are many more units who can document the same. I am glad to hear you found a mention of it with the Timber wolves! Thanks for sharing that.

 

I think it makes for an interesting display since it is out of the ordinary.

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  • 1 month later...
17thairborne

Finally got off my a$$ and ordered the Sten MkV rebuild kit with all the internal parts, springs, operating rods etc. WIll get back to working on the rebuild. Still waiting to get my ATF 1 so that I can purchasse a short barrel.

 

IO%20Bolt%20set.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
17thairborne

Sent off for the letter from Colt to provide serial number information about this one. Saw a different one on-line for sale that was sent to the US Govt Port Transportation Office in Oakland CA. I suspect that meant it went to OSS/Army Intel in the PTO according to the listing. Apparently the serial number range close to S. No. 10630 along with 999 other Commandos went with that same shipment.

 

Link for that gun online: http://shop.pre98.com/product.sc?productId=1574

 

Mine is in the 16,XXX S.No. range. Not sure if Colt sent the same group of consecutive serial numbers together or if they were mixed in.

 

I'll know more in 100 days and post the letter. Cost for the colt service was $75 for this type of firearm. Their services vary up to $300 for the rare early stuff, but most are either $75 or $100 and they ask for 100 days to process.

 


 

Ordnance contract W-478_ORD-3136 requested 3000 with the 2" barrel and these were issued to the Army Intelligence and OSS units.

 

Colt_Commando1.JPG

Colt_Commando2.JPG

 

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17thairborne

I finally got to the point where I could weld up my STEN project. I friend of mine solicited the assistance of a local talented welder to piece together my kit parts and the New IO parts that I purchased. Here it is on display in the junk room. My next step will be to blast all the components with a fine media and then refinish them with Brownell's manganese phosphate and semi-gloss black paint. Then it will sit patiently while I await my ATF papers for the barrel purchase and final assembly.

 

Welded2b.JPG

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  • 3 weeks later...
17thairborne

For over 10 years I have scoured every shop, auction and website looking for a single example of the US Army Special Blasting Cap cardboard box. I have seen two for sale over the years, by my bid was never enough. At one gun show I found both the cardboard version and from Hayes Otoupalik, who was there, I found the metal round can also. I am trying to confirm the era of the metal can, Hayes said it was definitely ww2, but I want to see another example to confirm, since the last one I had from Olin was Korean War era and looked similar.

post-15065-0-23598100-1400536299.jpg

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Chief Bast

Fantastic find on the US Army version of the blasting caps, Oz. I too have looked for these with no luck. I would love to know if you can confirm a date on the cylinder tin as I've never seen this style other than from Hayes.

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17thairborne

There is not date printed on the tin, but in an earlier post to this thread I posted a tin from Olin-Mathison corp. During WW2 they were only called Olin and merged with the other in 1958, makning the other tin post KW. This tin is identical in construction, but differs in the labeling. The Olin tin was for use on C3 and C4, this one says will detonate composition C. The style of the lettering is different as well.post-15065-0-20117900-1400594547.jpg

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17thairborne

Notice also that the labels on the box and the Atlas tin state "WILL DETONATE COMPOSITION C" whereas the Olin tin denoted "C3 and C4" I have an inert cardboard block which at one time contained Composition C and it is labeled "COMPOSITION C-2" Don't know when the improved formulas evolved to 3 and 4.

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17thairborne

Great find on the cardboard box, Oz... But now you need the white one with red lettering too... ;-)

 

I understand those are especially hard to find! Shall I wait another 10 years :rolleyes:

 

Being patient is not my best suit!

 

I was in the museum at Diekirch a few years ago and marveled at their Army Engineer display. They had several crates of the green boxes.

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17thairborne

Johan,

 

Thanks for posting the C3 crate. Now I know there was C3 as early as Aug 44. I should bo back and review my oldest 5-series FMs again. I have never been to the La Gleize museum. QUite impressive. In one way it just looks like a pile of stuff, but the more you look, the more it reveals. Good to see the pneumatic chain saw, the Engineer demolition kit, Blasting cap crates, an OD large size cap generator etc. Its now on my list of visits in the future.

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17thairborne

On another note:

 

A soon as the war in Europe ended, the 139th settled into occupation duty. One of the tasks for the staff was to prepare the narrative for the official Army History records. The data from these documents was then used to prepare a small booklet entitled “History 139th Airborne Engineers” It was published in 1945 and printed by Alfred Selb, Muelheim, Germany. The inside back cover was traditionally used to record names and hometowns of unit members. The page is simply titled “MY BUDDIES”. Here is a copy from two of those booklets from my collection. The most legible comes from Silver Star winner, Lt. Robert C. Reed, and the other belonged to T/4 Charles Wilhelm.

 

post-15065-0-55273600-1400782951.jpg

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