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Waited 34 years for a "Junk Room"


17thairborne
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  • 2 weeks later...

Working on another article for the French MILITARIA magazine. This one will feature Part II with the 139th AEB in the ETO. Here's some of the draft images.

 

post-15065-0-13582300-1410618570.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well...there's what you are supposed to do, and what I do. I am remiss in my obligation to properly clean. There is a line between cleaning too much and "wearing out" an item, and doing nothing. The best museums keep everything in enclosed humidity and temperature controlled cases, away from light and UV. I think the minimum would be a light dusting every 30 days or so. If careful, a vacuum with a soft brush attachment could be used in areas where you can't suk things into the canister or damage delicate threads, patches, or devices. Shooting the images puts my room in a jumble, so when I'm done with this article, I'm gonna clean everything and put it back. I don't use any cleaners or preservatives even on leather. I try and remove any verdigris which is created by the reaction between leather and brass.

 

I do want to turn the display into more of a diorama than a pile of stuff on the floor. Have been thinking of making the walls look something like European buildings or the like and blending the items into the scene. That will take a lot of planning though. I'm working on getting rid of some of the things that don't "fit in" and use the wall unit for loose demolition inert items. The rest will be spread out along the various scenes.

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Those are fantastic shots and will be a great contribution to the upcoming Militaria issue. Thanks for giving us a sneak-peak.

 

You truly do have some of the best WWII demolition items in the business. B)

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Thank you for the support!

 

I have made additional progress on the STEN project. I received my AFT Form 1 approved and here is the barrel with sight attached. Ready for test firing. I'll post the test firing video when complete. Then I will refinish it IAW the original black paint over phosphate finish.

 

STEN%20with%20barrel.jpg

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Corpsmancollector

Great posts Oz! The shots for Militaria Magazine are fantastic!

 

AB command patch arrived A-OK as well, thanks for a good deal.

 

Will

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Thanks for the response! It's like having your own museum...so the cleaning would be part of the curation.

 

But some things...like fabric...I wasn't certain how you'd go about it...

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Johan Willaert

Latest Shots for Militaria Magazine

 

attachicon.gifdemo 1 crop.jpg

 

This pictures makes me think back to the demo course I went through as an Infantry Buck Sgt back in 1985... Still training with what was mostly ex-Marshall Plan WW2 surplus demo gear we were taught when crimping a non-electric cap to a length of fuse, once the cap was attached to the fuse to hold our arm with the crimpers fastened around the cap as far behind our backs as possible before crimping the cap to the fuse... This was done to protect our faces from cap debris in case of accidental ignition...

 

Not knowing if this was also prescribed during WW2 I looked up proper crimping procedure in FM5-25 Demolitions & Explosives but it does not specify this action there...

 

Still great memories and great times blowing up all kinds of stuff...

 

Looking forward to the second part of your article...

 

Johan

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My demo training was 34 years ago, and I can't recall much about it. I could not find anything either on WW2 stuff.

 

I do like your attention to detail! THose types of small details make the difference in a shoot.

 

Tonight I will hope to get the shots of the bazooka man correct.

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Finally, the weather and my brain are clear enough for the first test firing. Armed with the STEN (and firing pin), safety materials, cleaning rod to check the barrel, ammo, camera etc I took to the desert to check my efforts. The ammo was Winchester 9mm, 115 grain, fmj. I fired at a range of 15 meters.

1. Test fired one round from an original magazine. Feeding was uneventful. I held the weapon in such a manner as to prevent any rearward flying components from striking me. The weapon fired without a problem and the spent casing was ejected slightly forward of the 3 o'clock position and about 5 meters from the weapon.

2. I loaded 3 rounds into the magazine and fired each one slowly, again with no feeding problems.

3. Next I tried a 15 round magazine firing at an average rapidity. Again, no problems whatsoever.

4. I fired a series of 25 round magazines at differing rates of semi-auto firing, again with no issues.

5. The final test was with a 25 round magazine at rapid semi-auto firing. Flawless.

 

Here is the link to the firing:

 

 

OBSERVATIONS:

a. I am extremely pleased that the weapon functioned without one fail or malfunction through 150 rounds of ammo.

b. I had adjusted and seasoned the two springs in accordance with the IO instructions. I did not have to make ANY adjustments.

c. I constructed and modified the selector switch iaw IO instructions so that it functions as a safety. In the A position, the trigger can be pulled, but the tripping lever does not release the block. In the R position, it fires in the semi-auto mode. This weapon will not fire in FA.

d. I would not use the A position as a safety. Placing the bolt handle in the upper slot leaves the block aft and breech open. That is the preferred method for me.

e. I am amazed that there is virtually no muzzle climb during rapid firing. The barrel can be held on target easily while firing from the hip. VERY controllable.

f. Virtually no recoil is felt owing to the nearly 10lbs weight of the weapon and magazine.

g. The casings seem to have a few more dings to the base than I am used to seeing. I've added an image for review.

h. The barrel seems to be well grooved as the spent round is nicely marked.

i. Post firing inspection of the gun revealed no damage or adverse wear.

j. Most of the spent casings were within a few inches of one another indicating a very constant ejection.

k. Final Observation. I used my video editing software to time the durations from the first round firing to the last. It took 4.09 seconds to discharge 25 rounds. That equates to a 366 rpm rate of fire in SA. Not bad.

 

9mm.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

Going out on patrol. Sgt John Petrel stops by the Battalion CP for a briefing before going out on patrol, 9 Jan 45. I received my four display props yesterday and began setting them up. Here are two of them. They add quite a bit of realism to my room and it has been a long wait to get to the point where I have both the room and resources to start experimenting with a few scenarios. These two were set up to see how the concept would look. I reported on the quality of the Yanks Mannequins in another post:

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/211609-military-lifelike-mannequins-manikins-for-small-size-uniforms/page-2

 

Here's the two-man diorama for now.

 

post-15065-0-28042800-1414615183.jpg

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Simply fantastic results, Oz! Your collection has truly grown into an advanced stage with these mannequins and displays, which add so much of that interactive and realistic dimension to the room, IMO. I've bookmarked the Yanks website and hope to be in a similar boat soon.

 

Please keep your topic updated as your "tinker" with the setup. B)

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Thanks for the supportive comments guys!

i wish they made mannequins with more realistic grip abilities... that would make them look even better! but i love how they look already though very very nice!

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Apparently Yanks Mannequins have hands that are molded in a special material that can be repositioned if you submerge them in boiling water for about 30 secs. I have not tried it yet.

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