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REMEMBER GRENADA 1983


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The scrim was a 2/505, battalion-level initiative based on the guidance of it's commander, Keith Nightingale and was worn throughout the campaign.

Nightingale was never a ranker.

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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo

If someone drives up to an armed soldier during a shooting conflict and won't roll down a car window? Really?

The really comment was meant for the person driving the car not you. We did population control points or PCP all the time during Grenada and sometimes the people wouldn't roll down the windows. And on occasion they were Cuban sympathizers and they wouldn't roll down the windows so we would threaten to bust a window if we had too. We Would bust Open doors on occasion as well, unnecessarily half the time. What do you expect with 18-year-olds with guns and explosives

 

This guy was in another unit so he may have just busted the window out just to get into the car to take the car.

 

And the really comment wasn't meant to be personal it was more of a rhetorical comment. Sorry about that.

 

Rock

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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo

Everyone wore scrim in the 2/505. Actually camo isn't useless as It breaks up the outline of the helmet. Secondly, our gillie suits were made in similar fashion for sniper training and sniper school. I believe the same technique is used today with good effect for snipers.

 

I don't know where you get your comment about soldiers being made fun of or politically incorrect comments but the entire battalion wore their helmets with the scrim on them and we were known as the cabbage patch kids.

 

And let me add, On more than one occasion other units would be frustrated when they couldn't see us because our helmets were camouflaged. Of course it was natural for the other units to make fun of us but we didn't care because we made fun of them. That is the natural state of the military where your unit is better than all the other units.

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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo

Cav scout, The concept of a war on terror really hadn't quite been ingrained in the fiber of the American people or for that matter the world at that point so population control points were not considered an area where someone Would set off a self detonated car bomb. Our minds were set on a conventional war as well as a special operations unconventional war. The Beirut Marine Corps barracks bombing was a shock to the world so we weren't used to that type of environment.

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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo

 

The scrim was a 2/505, battalion-level initiative based on the guidance of it's commander, Keith Nightingale and was worn throughout the campaign.

Sorry double post I'm messing with my new phone.

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Sgt_Rock_EasyCo

 

The scrim was a 2/505, battalion-level initiative based on the guidance of it's commander, Keith Nightingale and was worn throughout the campaign.

Scrim may not have been useful in a urban environment, which could be what you are referring to the 98% of the time. During the 1980s most of our combat operations were in Woodland and the jungle environments so this type of camouflage could have been quite effective and was quite effective. And as I said previously the use of netting and shredded canvas or sandbags was a common method of applying permanent camouflage to a Gilly suit for snipers or reconnaissance personnel. Camouflage is only as good as the person who is maintaining it.

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