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Humrighous Wing grouping of Col. Ervin N. Townsend


Jack's Son
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Hi JS!

 

Wow... oh wow... oh wow, you've got me groping for words! All I can say is THIS group is how one dreams of finding them...awesome.

 

Thank you for taking the time to post all of this great material.

 

My best to you,

 

Joe

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But you're still not a wing guy right? LOL Incredible group!

Thanks Paul :)..........Maybe an apprentice Wing Man!

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RC, Joe, Ram, Jeff, Bob and Danny...........thank you.

This group just came out of the blue, and I couldn't resist the opportunity. I think it's a winner too.
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Robin,

Very, very nice group. This was a period when our military had a lot of class in its uniforms and insignia, not like the "bus drivers" garb currently being worn by army personnel. If it was up to me I would get rid of the tarnish to show the real beauty of this badge, but that's just me and I suspect some on this forum are having a tissy fit over that suggestion. Nice and clean, the same way he would have worn it. Thanks for sharing.

Terry

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Robin,

........If it was up to me I would get rid of the tarnish to show the real beauty of this badge.........

Terry

 

Terry, I understand. Sometimes I look at my WWI wings and feel that I want to clean them so I can appreciate the workmanship that went into the wings. Then I wake up..................

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Terry, I understand. Sometimes I look at my WWI wings and feel that I want to clean them so I can appreciate the workmanship that went into the wings. Then I wake up..................

Robin,

I make it a practice to clean my metal wings at least once a year. I got that from Duncan when I was visiting him one day. He told me that no respectable pilot would ever wear tarnished wings and he wanted his to look like they did when they were being worn in WW1. I fully agree with him and have followed that advice since.

Terry

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OMG Robin, what a great grouping! It seems to match, what reads like, a "great guy" as well! Not being a wing collector but starting out as a coin collector as an 8 year old kid and continuing with high end slabbed coins well into my 30's. When anyone talks about "cleaning" its like running your fingernails down a chalk board for me. Not funny! :blink: Well maybe a little. :P

 

It is interesting they seem to be die struck but more or less blank faced, then hand engraved details on the front. Very cool! And like Kat I was trying to figure out what you meant by this strange new word! Add one to the picture file! You turned me green once again! :love:

 

Mark D.

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Robin,

I make it a practice to clean my metal wings at least once a year. I got that from Duncan when I was visiting him one day. He told me that no respectable pilot would ever wear tarnished wings and he wanted his to look like they did when they were being worn in WW1. I fully agree with him and have followed that advice since.

Terry

Terry,

I just wanted to thank you for your comment. Until Cliff had told me the same statement from Duncan, I believed by default, that the wings must stay in a dull shroud of the years, obfuscating the true detail of the wing. After I began to maintain my wings as you described, a whole new world of detail and intricacy opened up and I see what the pilot saw in his choice of wing or in the wing chosen for him. On some of the wings with a particularly heavy multi-layered residue on them, especially the uncommon & rare wings, like these Homrichous wings and the "stubby" WWI wing of myriad fine detail I was Blessed to become Steward over, an entirely new wing appeared from beneath the years of unkempt buildup to my amazement and delight. Thank You Again Fellow Steward and Historian....Mel

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Brother, you have done it again. What a great group, each piece by itself very nice but when all together the kind of group dreams are made of for WW1 aviation collectors.

 

Congrats!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Terry,

I just wanted to thank you for your comment. Until Cliff had told me the same statement from Duncan, I believed by default, that the wings must stay in a dull shroud of the years, obfuscating the true detail of the wing. After I began to maintain my wings as you described, a whole new world of detail and intricacy opened up and I see what the pilot saw in his choice of wing or in the wing chosen for him. On some of the wings with a particularly heavy multi-layered residue on them, especially the uncommon & rare wings, like these Homrichous wings and the "stubby" WWI wing of myriad fine detail I was Blessed to become Steward over, an entirely new wing appeared from beneath the years of unkempt buildup to my amazement and delight. Thank You Again Fellow Steward and Historian....Mel

 

Terry, Cliff.......what is the recipe for cleaning these fine old wings?

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 5 years later...

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