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Branch colors for Armored forces / Armored and central unit


Jamecharles
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Jamecharles

Good morning all!

I've an important question for all of you i've seen in some manual that Branch colors for Armored forces / Armored and central unit change , some tell main color green piped white and other main color green piped yellow, now question is there are any differences between Armored forces and Armored and central unit? wich of those colors are right??

thank you all for the help

 

Giancarlo

 

 

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Armored Force colors during WWII were definitely green and white. Those colors appear on numerous DUIs related to tank units. The two colors are also on the piping of enlisted men’s overseas caps, green being the dominant color. Green and yellow may have been postwar. Yellow is definitely postwar for the Armored Branch. But for WWII, you want green and white.

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Armor as a branch was created in 1940 and used green and white as it's branch colors. In 1951 Cavalry was abolished as a seperate branch and all of it's heraldry was assigned to Armor, including the branch color of yellow.

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Captainofthe7th

Military police is green and yellow. B229 has the rest of the info for green and white for armor until 1951.

 

Rob

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The tank collar brass was authorized in Feb. 1942, I would guess the green and white branch colors were authorized at the same time but I'm not sure about that. The 1943 "National Geographic" insignia book shows green and yellow for armor, though that may have been an error; it was changed to green and white in the 1945 edition. Green is used as a contrasting color for armored unit guidons and such, which is why the MP colors were reversed from yellow-piped-green to green-piped-yellow in 1951 according to TIOH.

TIOH pages for: Armor and armored precursors.

 

Armored Force (1940) was changed to Armored Command in 1943 and Armored Center in 1944. They were basically top-level headquarters organizations in charge of armored training, standards and doctrine, but not in control of operational armored units.

 

Justin B.

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The tank collar brass was authorized in Feb. 1942, I would guess the green and white branch colors were authorized at the same time but I'm not sure about that. The 1943 "National Geographic" insignia book shows green and yellow for armor, though that may have been an error; it was changed to green and white in the 1945 edition. Green is used as a contrasting color for armored unit guidons and such, which is why the MP colors were reversed from yellow-piped-green to green-piped-yellow in 1951 according to TIOH.

 

TIOH pages for: Armor and armored precursors.

 

Armored Force (1940) was changed to Armored Command in 1943 and Armored Center in 1944. They were basically top-level headquarters organizations in charge of armored training, standards and doctrine, but not in control of operational armored units.

 

Justin B.

 

Yes, quite right. I was running on memory. Thanks for correcting that.

 

There is a chart that's been referenced before on the forum showing the adoption of cord-edge braid ("piping") colors for EM's garrison caps and it lists 1942 for armor. That would make much more sense since, as you point out, the BOS was adopted at that time. I would imagine the National Geo chart is simply a mistake.

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There was no BRANCH called Armor in WWII. As with Tank Destroyers, Armor was not legally and officially a BRANCH (which is established, in the REGULAR Army, by Congressional action). They were FORCES, as temporary, war-service-only, ad hoc THINGs.

 

On Army guidons the "first-named color" of the branch is the background color and the "second-named color" is the color for the number, letter, BOS emblem. Same applies to officer shoulder boards, first-named is the background, etc. Hence MP is green/yellow, Armor is yellow/green.

 

(Cavalry guidons have been red and white since the 1840s, when they were tactical "markers" and two hi-vis colors were wanted, one dark, one light. This was long before units had any branch-color guidons.)

 

When Congress created the "Armor" branch, merging the long-official BRANCH called Cavalry with the remnants of the Armored Force/Comd, the legiuslation called the new branch "Cavalry-Armor". This point was soon forgotten.....

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  • 2 years later...
Jamecharles

So which is the most appropriate branch color for a pre 1942 BOS like the one here attached?

 

Yellow as cavalry or light blue for infantry?

Gs

post-770-0-67513200-1458644875.jpg

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So which is the most appropriate branch color for a pre 1942 BOS like the one here attached?

 

Yellow as cavalry or light blue for infantry?

Gs

Infantry Blue.

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