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ramram

Amazing Japanese POW handwritten diary

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Sign says "Civilians Keep Out Or Be Shot" . I'm suspecting these signs were put up with tongue in cheek.

 

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These next 4 might be from within Bilibid prison where he spent the last few months before liberation.

 

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Those last shots are indeed Bilibid. The blockhouse is distinctive.

 

Kurt


!!!! WANTED !!!!

WWII Prisoner of War items : Medals, Mail, Diaries, Photos, Documents, Scrapbooks + More

WWII Naval Aviation Groupings : Medals, Documents, Scrapbooks, Photos, Flight Logs, Flight Jackets + More

 


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ramram,

 

Fantastic items! I actually own a nice grouping that belonged to this same veteran. I have his medals, trench art mess kit, canteen, cup, musette, photographs and a few other items. You can find my post with photographs on this forum. I would love to talk with you! Hope to hear from you soon.

 

Best Regards,

 

John


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Here is his Bronze Star citation

 

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Here is the link to the other part of the group:

 

 

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/181420-wwii-31st-infantry-officer-pow-grouping-medals-trench-art-and-more/


!!!! WANTED !!!!

WWII Prisoner of War items : Medals, Mail, Diaries, Photos, Documents, Scrapbooks + More

WWII Naval Aviation Groupings : Medals, Documents, Scrapbooks, Photos, Flight Logs, Flight Jackets + More

 


donation2007.gifdonation2008.gifdonation2009.gifdonation2010.gifdonation2011.gif

donation2012.gifdonation2013.gifdonation2014.gifdonation2015.gifdonation2016.gif
donation2017.gifdonation2018.gifdonation2019.gifdonation2020.gif

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I was going through one of my other diaries from, as I recall, a radioman on a TBF Avenger flying from the USS Hornet. He writes about making attacks on Manila on October 18 and 19, 1944 just prior to the invasion at Leyte. Meanwhile, Hinkle is writing from Bilibid prison in Manilla describing these same bombing from his vantage point!

 

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Here is an entry regarding the April 4, 1943 escape from Davao prison camp. There is a pretty good book out there called "Escape From Davao: The Forgotten Story of the Most Daring Prison Break of the Pacific War" about this escape.

 

Rob M.

 

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Here is some general information about this escape/book:

 

Sports and military historian Lukacs tells the story of the only successful escape of a group of POWs from a Japanese prison camp during World War II. Lukacs effectively conveys the horrors of life for American POWs in the Philippines. The central figure of the story, Maj. William Edwin Dyess of the Army Air Forces, was an ace fighter pilot who sunk numerous Japanese boats. He was one of thousands of prisoners in the infamous Bataan Death March, in which prisoners were marched with little or no food or water in blistering heat; many were randomly bayoneted or beheaded. At the prison camps, conditions were scarcely better; the Japanese refused to follow the Geneva Convention rules for prisoner treatment. Prison-guard duty was seen as a lowly assignment in the Japanese army, given to the worst soldiers, who took out their frustrations on the Americans in the most brutal ways imaginable. Occasionally, prisoners would try unsuccessfully to escape; once, when three escapees were recaptured, the guards tied them to stakes and beat them for three days before shooting them. Nonetheless, Dyess and nine others were determined to escape, and they slipped away during a work detail, trudging through miles of marshland infested with leeches, crocodiles and stinging wasps. They met up with sympathetic Filipino guerrillas, and after many delays, ably captured by Lukacs, they eventually made it to freedom. However, in a strange twist, Dyess and the others were ordered not to discuss their brutal prison treatment. Among other concerns, higher-ups in the U.S. government were worried about Japanese retaliatory action against American prisoners still in the Philippines. The author's account of the escapees' determination to break their silence is one of the most engaging parts of the book. A fast-moving, real-life escape story, and an unexpected chronicle of a fight against censorship

 

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Hi Ramram, this is BataanSon. I'm in the Philippines, working with the Bataan WW2 Museum. This is a fascinating document. Have you considered sharing it with the wider public? I'd like to get in touch with you, please let me know how to go about it, as I'm new here. Thank you very much.

 

 

 

 

 

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